Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


 

Messages - geegee

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 20
1
General Discussion / Re: border crossings
« on: January 01, 2020, 02:29:53 pm »
You should be able to get a stamp at the Canadian border if you asked for one. They don't normally do it for Americans as they expect these crossings to be frequent and routine. If the guy at the booth doesn't have the proper stamp you may have to go into the office after going through.

2
General Discussion / Re: Warm Showers Reliability
« on: April 23, 2019, 02:42:21 pm »
I host more than I use Warmshowers as a guest. With very few exceptions, I've practically accepted everyone who has asked. However, when I do tour, I never use it as a means to save money, I look at it as a way to meet other cyclists. I'm pickier when it comes to finding hosts, if I don't find anyone interesting to stay with in a particular area, I don't bother asking and look for paid accommodations which I budget for anyway.

3
I check windy.com regularly while I'm on tour. it's great for managing expectations as it lets you see wind patterns on a macro scale on a map. You can click on any location to find out what the speed and direction and the pop-ups expand to a weather forecast. They have a phone ap, too.

4
If you mean interstate 40, taking Route 66 instead would definitely be a better way to go. If you mean US40, there are a few parallel routes you can string together like the Katy Trail. I rode from LA to upstate NY then to Canada a few years ago, if you are interested you can find my route maps on my blog at http://abikeridecalledamerica.blogspot.com . I wanted to visit specific places so I had to create my own route. The roads were good for most of it, if you followed it to Buffalo you could continue on the Erie Canal route to Albany and then bike down the Hudson to NYC, which is probably one of the more pleasant ways to get to the Big Apple.

5
General Discussion / Re: Best Airlines for Bikes: US to EU
« on: February 28, 2018, 09:55:23 am »
The way your bike is treated is more on the part of the airport baggage handlers than the airline. Try to fly into a city that has a cycling culture, your bike might have better chances of being treated better. I've flown into Amsterdam, Brussels, Paris, Dublin, Munich and Hamburg with no issues. Some airports even have bike assembly areas .

I think airlines that charge more than $75 for a bike each way are asking too much. I usually fly Air Canada because it's my local airline and they only charge $50. Some charter flights charge as little as $25 to $30 if your bike counts as part of your baggage allowance. They all publish their fees online, so it's not too hard to factor in when you're shopping for your ticket.

6
General Discussion / Re: Tourist stickers
« on: January 17, 2018, 10:44:04 pm »
I'm more of a pinhead :)


7
General Discussion / Re: Riding the Gaspe Peninsula
« on: September 19, 2017, 06:36:15 am »
What kind of experience are you looking for, what are your preferences? From a scenic point of view, I think the Gaspésie is best seen counterclockwise since you'll have the sea on your side. However, the north side is quite hilly and windy, which generally means pretty strong prevailing headwinds on nice days if you're heading west and tail winds in inclement weather. The south, with the exception of the climb through the Matapédia  valley, is flatter into the town of Gaspé. Technically, it would be "easier" done clockwise with the wind pushing you through the hilliest parts. There remain missing gaps in the Route verte in the northeast, so there will be stretches without shoulders.

The train to the town of Gaspé is currently not operational if you re thinking of it as an option to return. There is rail service in Campbellton NB and Matapédia QC, on the Halifax-Montreal route though. The intercity buses (Orléans Express) will happily take your bike and they sell boxes at the stations.

If you're up for a wilder, less populated coastal experience, I just got back from riding the north shore of the Gulf of St Lawrence from Baie-Comeau to Natashquan then up the coast by ship to Labrador and northern Newfoundland. Spectacular up there!

8
Canada / Re: Northern Ontario — Lake Huron
« on: July 31, 2017, 10:37:19 am »
I know they've been gradually putting in shoulders on highway 6 for years, last I looked there was just 20 kms left to do south of Little Current between Espanola and South Baymouth. They might have done it this summer. I believe implementation with regards to the trail is putting up signage.

I was in the Bruce peninsula last year, a friend has a place right on the proposed route through Lion's Head. I doubt they'll do much to the county roads there as the traffic is super light anyway.


9
The eTrex runs on two AA batteries, which is really convenient. You can get about 20 hours out of a pair. I carry a several spare rechargeables with me, as soon as it warns me the batteries are low I just switch out and recharge later.

The notifications on the eTrex are just beeps, you glance at the screen see which direction to turn.

By the way, I use the mount made by RAM, they are so much better than the ones Garmin makes.

10
I like using a dedicated GPS unit that gives audible cues for turns. It replaces a bike computer since it automatically records distance, speed and altitude (I don't even have to jot these down and reset the computer daily), and allows me to enjoy the scenery or concentrate on road safety without having to constantly glance down at a map or be preoccupied with wayfinding. It also gives me the freedom of taking any interesting detours with its ability to automatically reroute me back on track further on.

I toured with paper maps throughout Europe and North America in the 1990s and early 2000s and I much prefer the simplicity of something like a Garmin eTrex on my handlebar now.

11
General Discussion / Re: Canada+USA: Biggest accepted bill?
« on: May 30, 2017, 11:05:15 am »
Gas station stores rarely have problems with breaking $50s and $100s. Ever since Canada went with polymer bills which are easier to check for counterfeit with due diligence and training, the comfort level in accepting larger bills has improved.

12
Routes / Re: Total Solar Eclipse
« on: May 29, 2017, 10:47:49 pm »
I remember cycle touring in Europe during a total solar eclipse in 1999, it was awesome. I ended up being on a hilltop in rural Hungary, right next to the Discovery Channel crew filming it so I knew I was in a good spot :) Try being where the eclipse happens at high noon, it will be a real treat if there are no clouds in the sky as the stars will come out. Don't forget the special glasses/filters for you eyes!

Five years ago I was riding through northern Texas where the annular solar eclipse happened at sunset. It was also incredible to look at but without the need for much eye protection since it was sinking into the horizon:




13
Canada / Northern Ontario — Lake Huron
« on: May 04, 2017, 11:12:52 pm »
Just a heads up to cross-Canada cyclists, a bike route from Sault Ste. Marie to Sudbury avoiding quite a bit of Highway 17. Free downloadable maps at: http://www.lhncwaterfronttrail.ca/about.html

14
General Discussion / Re: La Route Verte- Quebec
« on: May 04, 2017, 10:46:21 pm »
July and August will be quite similar weatherwise. One thing that might influence your decision is the Quebec construction holiday which falls on July 23 to August 6 this year. It's when the construction industry officially goes on vacation, filling up a lot of the accommodations and campgrounds throughout the province.

15
General Discussion / Re: Bears in Canada?
« on: March 27, 2017, 08:25:41 am »
I like enjoy this type of touring: Flat, small grades and able to chew up a lot of miles. I also enjoy the desert and great plains. Easy to plan for reaching the next town because there is no steep mountain pass in between that will suck all energy out of you.

Highway 17 along Lake Superior is a roller coaster, with pretty steep grades (10+%). Highway 11 which veers farther north through Hearst and Kapuskasing is a flatter alternative with less traffic. The Canadian Shield geology is mostly extremely tough granite which makes road building expensive and difficult, so they tended to do minimal grading on the old highways. If you come across road construction where they're flattening or straightening there's a lot of dynamite involved. So many rivers and lakes though, if you have a filter you'll never be short of water.

Quote
But on the roads in Ontario and Quebec I have no idea what the real situation is: Do I need to take Rocky Mountain like precautions already there?

In the Rockies the valleys are very limiting, so that the roads and railways share the same tight corridors as wildlife. Northern Ontario and Quebec are wide open wilderness where wildlife can roam freely with fewer obstacles. I find the likelihood of seeng wildlife much higher in the Rockies and almost a guarantee, whereas you can do a long drive on the main highways here and not see a large wild animal. I've lived 35 years in Ontario and done a lot of wilderness camping, and I've only seen bear along the road maybe 3 times.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 20