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Messages - Westinghouse

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1
General Discussion / Re: It Ain't The Prettiest, But . . .
« on: March 18, 2020, 03:30:02 am »
SJ -

You don't say where you are from, but the Silver Comet suggests Alabama or Georgia.
I have a reputation here and elsewhere of being the guy who rides the emptiest roads.
I've done more than 100,000 miles of touring - bad habit - and prefer peace and quiet.

1. Most states have AADT data available through their DOT websites.
Average Annual Daily Traffic is a good measure of how busy the road is.
Traffic is usually busier during morning and evening rush hours and in summer.
But roads to popular parks or lakes can be different - esp. around holidays.

Here's an example of a PDF map of Kansas state highways:
https://www.ksdot.org/Assets/wwwksdotorg/bureaus/burTransPlan/maps/CountMaps/Districts/countmap2018.pdf
Many states also have AADT in a database map system such as Indiana & Georgia:
https://indot.ms2soft.com/tcds/tsearch.asp?loc=Indot&mod
https://gdottrafficdata.drakewell.com/publicmultinodemap.asp

Here is my general comfort guide to traffic levels:
Less than 500 - Magical
500-999         - Excellent
1000-1999     - O.K., shoulders helpful but not essential
2000-3999     - Fair to poor, shoulders needed
4000 plus       - Tough, shoulders definitely needed

2. Next most important aspect is paved shoulders.
A very few states have shoulder width info - although it is unreliable, I find.
Most of us simply use Google Maps Streetview when available.
Quite a few states have Bicycling Maps which are often only marginally useful.
Arizona's bike map was probably done by people who have never been on a bike.

3. Different regions have different attitudes towards cyclists on the road.
Most of us who have toured for years have heard, "Get off the road!"
I've lived in the South and toured all over the U.S. and the South is worst.
(Some may disagree, but look at the number of bike trails for Iowa vs Arkansas.)
Similarly, it pays to use caution around major holidays like July 4th when people drink.

<<<>>>

So, to answer your question -

Close by - there a excellent, nearly empty county roads in south Georgia and south Alabama.
Empty roads, of course, have fewer services, especially with the demise of the country store.

You could use the Georgia AADT info and develop a great tour out of Plains.
Maybe even stop in and see Jimmy and Rosalyn at church on Sunday.

I rode the area 10 years back and can attest to how empty most roads are. Key word - "most".
https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/page/?o=1mr&page_id=72076&v=7Y

Further away -
Thousands of miles of empty roads in the Great Plains.
My pick - a loop in the Sandhills of Nebraska out of Valentine.

Even further -
Scenic Wyoming - at the base of the Bighorn Mountains.
Buffalo, Gillette, Wright, Kaycee, Buffalo.
The Hwy 50 section has more traffic, but shoulders.
Which is often the case with road touring - always a section that is busier.

Safe travels - Jama


I've done more than 100,000 miles of touring - bad habit - and prefer peace and quiet.


Bad habit????  LOL. Sounds like the best habit one could have.

2
There's all kinds of information online about visa requirements for various countries, and people going from one country to another. Immigration and border control are the people to ask. Rules change. What was true last year could be different now. It used to be that you had to get a passport checked and stamped at each national border in western Europe, and there was no ETA. Just show up with the official document. Nowadays I understand travel between countries is free, just like traveling interstate in the US. Having a passport would eliminate some doubts. An exact ETA was and probably still is a big deal going into Russia or from China into Vietnam. Probably not Canada for nationals from NZ. They might want to check that you have sufficient funds for your length of stay. Rules change. Departments of state advise travelers to keep abreast of the rules. Some change over night. I do not know Canada's rules. I think you can just appear, show documentation, and continue your journey. Russia required exact ETA. They wanted addresses of all places one planned to stay during the trip, exactly how long at each place, and names of persons at those locations, and reason for the visit, and on and on.Look at Russian history. No wonder they are so up tight.

3
General Discussion / Re: Security - locking your bike
« on: March 12, 2020, 07:38:22 pm »
I always used the least expensive, lightest locks available, $1.00 locks from Dollar Tree store. It protects only from a grab and go theft that can happen in a few seconds. Any cable cutter for brake cables can cut through it in one second. In restaurants I sit where the bike is visible through a window, and keep it locked against a sudden run up and go theft. I would not leave it locked anywhere out of sight for a long time. I stealth camp, and still lock it at night, though the likelihood that Scudgemoe might track me to my spot in the woods to purloin my ride is about zero. I read a story about a cyclist who camped in a wooded area one night. He got out of his tent in the morning. All his gear, bike too, was gone. A manager of a Wendy's restaurant in Phoenix, Arizona told me this story. A guy on a bicycle pulled up. He leaned his bike against the wall outside. He went inside to get something to eat and drink. Sure, there were large windows. The guy had a good view of his bike. Very quickly a man ran up to the bike, mounted, and took off like a bat out of hell. By the time the cyclist was on his feet and out the door, Scudgemoe was half way down the block. The manager told me he did not know the outcome after that, but the thief did get away with the bike. If you ride an expensive bicycle, always lock it wherever and whenever. Some bicycle thieves know what to look for in bicycles. A high end touring bike or any other type is what they look for. And beside that. A lock is good for one thing, and that is to keep an honest man honest.


4
General Discussion / Re: Need information on Continental Gatorskin.
« on: March 12, 2020, 07:12:02 pm »
OK, at least 2000 miles, and more. So, going from FL to San Diego, it would be advisable to rotate in San Antonio perhaps buy new in El Paso, or a spare. If I complete this trip, I will report the mileage and wear-tear facts. Marathons will go all the way across with much tread to spare. It is hard to guess very accurately. Much climbing with a load wears back tires faster than cycling on a smooth, more nearly level surface. I imagine chip seal roads kill tires faster than smooth asphalt. Rotating means higher average mileage for both tires. Too man variables to say for sure all that accurately. I'm trying to get a general idea from other peoples' experiences. At $30.00, a tire should be durable.

5
Wind and weather are variables, for sure. One person runs into strong side winds. Another has smooth sailing all the way. Things change and that means roads. When I first started bicycle touring, Hwy US 1 in south Florida was a good road to avoid. That was 1984. Nowadays it is good for cycling, except for some towns like Fort Pierce and Melbourne where there is no margin of safety, and sidewalks are old-town style . On one trip from southeast coastal Florida to San Diego, CA I got a total of 25 minutes of rain, and that  was in Slidell, Louisiana. On another trip along the same route, rain and wind forced me off the road several times. On another crossing there were many side winds and head winds, many out of the southeast as I traveled east to west. I laid over in Van Horn, TX, the town with $22.00 motels. The day I set out from Van Horn, a following wind blew up. I made it 126 miles into El Paso. 98 is good for cycling, but it adds miles, and that sea breeze can put a dent in your plans. The thing to do is do it, and see how it works out. I am planning a long trip in the US. I will keep a constant watch on weather reports and forecasts. I got caught out in seriously dangerous weather events that make me feel sure it is a miracle I am still alive. It's good they are adding on to Hwy 98. I would not use it, but if one wants to see the gulf coast, and all those groovy little towns along the way, it's the road to travel.

6
General Discussion / Re: Need information on Continental Gatorskin.
« on: March 11, 2020, 08:15:44 pm »
I do not know the difference in weight. It is not noticeable by hand when I pick them up. I think the dura skin is reinforcement on  the side walls. I am trying to figure out how far I can go before getting a new tire. I don't want to find out by POP !!! and PPSSSsssssttt.

7
There are three roads crossing north Florida going east to west. Which one is best for you to bike depends on the kind of touring you do. The most popular route is highway 90. It runs from Jacksonville, FL to Van Horn, TX.  If you need designated camp grounds, motels, and you want to visit sites of cultural and historic interest, 90 is your road. One thing about 90 is it can get very hilly. Some hills are quite long and might present a difficult to insurmountable challenge to inexperienced cyclists starting out from Jacksonville. You could also encounter heavy traffic.

Farther south is highway 20. This road is clean. It has side lanes. It is rolling, but it does not have the long steep hills found on 90. It is an easier ride, faster and safer. On my three crossings using 20, I do not remember seeing a camp ground or any sign of one. There is a motel here and there. If you stealth camp, and are looking just to cross the state, 20 is the way to go.

Farther south, following the contour of the shore line on the gulf of Mexico, is highway 98. I used it twice. It is nearly level with small rises here and there. It has many restaurants and motels. It is not a good place to live during a hurricane, but that is a different matter. Certainly there are places of interest. Be all that as it may, there are two reasons I know for avoiding this route. Both times I used it I fought a stiff side wind, south to north, coming in from the gulf. Because it follows the shore line, it adds 60 miles. For many that is a full day of cycling. Add side wind to 60 extra miles, and you question using this road for bicycling, unless you have to.  So, there you are.
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8
Routes / Three roads across Florida on the southern tier.
« on: March 11, 2020, 08:01:00 pm »
There are three roads crossing north Florida going east to west. Which one is best for you to bike depends on the kind of touring you do. The most popular route is highway 90. It runs from Jacksonville, FL to Van Horn, TX.  If you need designated camp grounds, motels, and you want to visit sites of cultural and historic interest, 90 is your road. One thing about 90 is it can get very hilly. Some hills are quite long and might present a difficult to insurmountable challenge to inexperienced cyclists starting out from Jacksonville. You could also encounter heavy traffic.

Farther south is highway 20. This road is clean. It has side lanes. It is rolling. It does not have the long steep hills found on 90. It is an easier ride, faster and safer. On my three crossings using 20, I do not remember seeing a camp ground or any sign of one. There is a motel here and there. If you stealth camp, and are looking just to cross the state, 20 is the way to go.

Farther south, following the contour of the shore line on the gulf of Mexico, is highway 98. I used it twice. It is nearly level with small rises here and there. It has many restaurants and motels. It is not a good place to live during a hurricane, but that is a different matter. Certainly there are places of interest. Be all that as it may, there are two reasons I know for avoiding this route. Both times I used it I fought a stiff side wind, south to north, coming in from the gulf. Because it follows the shore line, it adds 60 miles. For many that is a full day of cycling. Add side wind to 60 extra miles, and you question using this road for bicycling, unless you have to.  So, there you are.

9
General Discussion / Re: TransAmerica Trail 2018 - Documentary
« on: March 10, 2020, 09:29:25 pm »
An outstanding adventure. I have thought about doing the Transam. I will probably do the GART. Thanks for the videos. I watch them.

10
General Discussion / Need information on Continental Gatorskin.
« on: March 10, 2020, 05:39:32 pm »
I have here a set of Continental Gatorskin dura skin bicycle tires, 700 by 28. I plan to use them for a long distance, loaded tour. In the past I used Schwalbe Marathons to great satisfaction. If there is a better touring tire, what could it be? I bought Schwalbe new only to find they will not fit the bicycle frame. They expand too far and rub on the frame. I will not buy 26 inch wheels, so here I am with the considerably lighter thinner Continentals. Can anyone give me a good idea of what kind of distance these tire will go before needing to be replaced? Is there anyone who has toured on a loaded bicycle with these tires? I read some entries on a forum, but the numbers varied so much it baffled me. One said 200 miles and I know they are much better than that. Another said 10,000 kilometers, , and I think we all know better than that. If you have seriously toured on Continental Gatorskins, what can I expect for mileage?

11
General Discussion / Re: Coordinated stalking on the road
« on: February 27, 2020, 03:00:56 am »
Please continue. your ignorance might just capture somebody's attention. You know you are lying.

12
General Discussion / Re: Coordinated stalking on the road
« on: February 22, 2020, 08:11:10 pm »
"Scissors" occur when a cyclist has a car overtaking as well as oncoming.
How often do scissors occur in a given stretch or road?
It's geometric.

If 100 cars are eastbound and 100 westbound, there will be 10,000 scissors.
If 200 cars are eastbound and 200 westbound, there will be 40,000 scissors.
(Provided all cars cover the entire route and the last eastbound departs before the first westbound finishes.)
* Real time traffic models are far more complex, of course.

The OP had little to do with scissors as you call it. It was about two or more vehicles crossing the first expansion crack of e-v-e-r-y bridge from Florida to California at exactly the same time as a transcontinental cyclist. And other matters like that which were not by any possibility chance. In fact this bridge noise happened on back roads where traffic might be seen only occasionally, a few cars in half an hour or so. Out on the interstate where there was much more steady traffic, it was observed the three-abreast arrangement happened not at all or so infrequently that observer stopped looking for it.

But that gives you an idea - - scissors are not uncommon.
In fact, they are to be expected.

13
General Discussion / Re: Coordinated stalking on the road
« on: February 22, 2020, 08:02:42 pm »
Can't remember who said it, "Never ascribe to malice what can adequately be explained by stupidity."  Or perhaps, in this case, chance.  How would two cars or trucks time things so perfectly without another one to alert them when and where that solitary cyclist is riding?  Remember, "no traffic for hours" to cue them.

The cyclist himself is the third party alert. His speed is easily determined. You can start out in a car two hours after he passes, and accurately predict when you will overtake. Same from the other direction. There you have your three parties. Where visibility is clear and infinite, as they call it, both motorists get him in sight, and fine tune the intercept by dead reckoning and adjusting speed. Besides that, I had already told you I had seen these deliberately coordinated patterns many times. That really equals=many times. I was directly involved in day after day, week after week---damn near every day. The people doing it are criminals.



14
General Discussion / Re: Success rate finding a tent camping spot
« on: February 19, 2020, 04:42:27 pm »
I have never used them. I have no intention of ever doing so. In general, in some areas, police, firemen and other municipal workers engage in questionable, unconstitutional, illegal activities. They are not your friends. They are not my friends. I would not camp with or by or near them. Suit yourself. Many cyclists have used them for camping. Everything went well from what I read.

15
General Discussion / Re: Success rate finding a tent camping spot
« on: February 19, 2020, 03:52:18 pm »
I usually free-camped in wooded areas. I would not have thought to do it that way.

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