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General Discussion / Re: Getting to your start with all your stuff
« Last post by HikeBikeCook on January 19, 2021, 05:10:36 pm »
I know in the Northeast there is Bolt and Megabus which are super clean, super discount options my kids used when in college. Not sure if they would take a bike on board.

Bolt has currently suspend service due to COVID https://www.boltbus.com/

https://us.megabus.com/
Mega Bus Policy  :-\

Can I take my bicycles, skis, snowboards, golf clubs, or musical instruments on board the bus?
Unfortunately megabus buses are unable to carry these items unless they are in a case that does not exceed the dimensions stated in the luggage policy.

For guidance, this case must not exceed 62 inches when adding the total exterior dimensions of the piece (length + width + height) and should not weigh more than 50 pounds.

Megabus cannot store these items if they are out of a case due to the potential for damage to other customers' luggage.
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General Discussion / Re: Getting to your start with all your stuff
« Last post by John Nettles on January 19, 2021, 08:50:11 am »
I have to admit that Greyhound is not that great and will avoid them if possible but I have ridden Jefferson Bus Lines (which I think goes to Jama's town) about 5 times and never had an issue. 

Always clean, on time, the driver's don't put up with crap from unruly passengers, etc.  My only complaint is that I once wanted to use them but there was no way I could get a bike box (or cardboard available to make one) since it was a "roadside stop" for the bike and they would not allow me to place the unboxed bike on the bus.  Since I was calling to see if they would, maybe they just rejected me based on policy and the driver might not have when I was just standing there.  Since I couldn't guarantee a spot for the bike, I chose a different destination.

Maybe I was just lucky or Jama was unlucky.
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General Discussion / Re: Getting to your start with all your stuff
« Last post by staehpj1 on January 19, 2021, 07:53:17 am »
I flew with my bike and my stuff my first tour (Trans America).  The bike was in a box and the gear was in another.  They made me sign a waiver saying they were only responsible for loss and not damage because stuff was in cardboard instead of  luggage.  Since then I have used other methods including cheap duffle bags and thrift store luggage.  I like picking up a used bag for $7-8 and disposing of it at the airport.

That all works well for me since I like to ride out of the airport.  For folks who don't, shipping to a bike shop, warmshowers host, or other place can be a good option.  Using a shipper like shipbikes.com or bikeflights.com can be pretty reasonable.   Bike shops will typically receive and assemble your bike for a fee.

I pack really light these days with ultralight camping gear so I can get bike and gear into one soft case and keep it all under 50#.  If I go over a little it can go in a little personal item sized backpack.  I have not needed a a second checked bag or even a carry on bag on recent trips.

I like to get to the start by flying with the bike, but at the end of the tour I tend to be happy to pay a bike shop to pack it up and ship it home for me.
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General Discussion / Re: Getting to your start with all your stuff
« Last post by jamawani on January 19, 2021, 07:25:11 am »
Why's that?

1. Woman overdoses in back of bus.
2. Aisle floor like flypaper from beverage spills.
3. Mentally ill person talking loudly to nobody and everybody.
4. Homeland Security empties bus on side of highway in the middle of the night.
5. Terrified young Chinese couple with toddler sitting on front row.
6. Filthy bus stations in major cities.
7. Baggage charges almost as bad as airlines.
8. Long delay when driver quits mid-route.
9. And more.

(Because I have toured for 33 years, I've done way too much Greyhound.)
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General Discussion / Re: Getting to your start with all your stuff
« Last post by HikeBikeCook on January 19, 2021, 07:13:42 am »
TCS - From your tag line referring to touring in North Cornwall I assume you are in the UK. Greyhound, unless you were joking, is a bus line that covers most of the US.
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General Discussion / Re: Getting to your start with all your stuff
« Last post by TCS on January 18, 2021, 11:49:43 pm »

93,291. Greyhound. (Also known as "Riding the dog")


Why's that?
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Routes / Re: Lower Columbia - Washington or Oregon Side?
« Last post by jamawani on January 18, 2021, 10:39:53 pm »
I'm thinking even more "back" than Vernonia - -
Via Beaver Falls on the Old Highway, then Apiary & Meissner Roads.
Paved county roads vs. Oregon Hwy 47 - - even quieter.
Of course, there's no old growth left in Columbia County - -
And you are likely to see a big, new clear-cut on any back road.
(They tend to leave a screen of trees along main highways, nowadays.)

Also, doing Clatskanie-Mist-Pittsburg-Scappoose
Means crossing the Nehalem divide at 1300 ft. twice.
Apiary-Meissner Rds skirt the divide topping out once at 1200.
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Pacific Northwest / Re: Vancouver, BC to Astoria - first long bike tour
« Last post by HobbesOnTour on January 18, 2021, 10:29:06 pm »
Tara, forgive me if this comes across as patronising but there's a whole lot more to cycle touring than distance.

Working from the assumption that you haven't ridden seriously in 20 years, 100 mile days in a row is a big ask!
At an average of 12mph that's 8 hours straight on the bike. Start at 8 am and cycle continously until 4pm. Stop for lunch? Then it'll be 5 pm. Take a few breaks then arrival is back to 6 pm. Running behind schedule? That just adds to the pressure. I don't like touring under pressure.
(For the sake of comparison, I rearely clock up more than 5 hours moving in a day).

Assuming you have a bike, my advice would be to use it as much as possible. Get to know how your body reacts. What does 50 miles feel like? And the next day?

When you have an idea what speed/distance you're comfortable covering, repeatedly,  then you'll be in a better position to plan.

I've seen it said before that for a regular cyclist if they add up their weekly mileage then that is roughly the distance they can expect to cover in one day. From my experince it seems to hold up - I commuted 200km a week and would be confident of being able to cover 200km in a day. Of course, touring, with baggage and presumably an emphasis on enjoyment, will be a bit different.

For me, touring is all about tbe experience, being in the moment. There's a wonderful sense of freedom, there's no work, no appointments. Being able to stop and appreciate wherever I am and interact with the people I meet. Food, no matter how basic, can taste delicious! These are all difficult things to experience and appreciate if we're rushing, racing the clock and tired.

For what it's worth, I have never trained for a tour. I do practice, though. I go away for long weekends or little overnights. I prefer to camp. I'd often cycle a roundabout route to end up in a campsite 10km from my front door. In winter, I practiced cold weather camping on a friend's farm. I learned about navigation, eating, drinking, cooking, gear, weather, mechanics etc. by doing. I was getting fitter, sure, but I was also developing knowledge and skills that made a bigger tour far less daunting and more enjoyable.

Best of luck!






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Routes / Re: Lower Columbia - Washington or Oregon Side?
« Last post by adventurepdx on January 18, 2021, 09:53:50 pm »
I think I'm gonna beg, borrow, or buy me a boat ride
from St Helens to north Sauvie Island.
Then ride down the west side dike along the Multnomah Channel.
Kinda crazy, but it sure beats US 30, eh?

(I've hitched across the Mississippi and other big rivers before.)

Cool if you can pull it off. But does the "back" way not appeal to you?
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Routes / Re: Lower Columbia - Washington or Oregon Side?
« Last post by John Nettles on January 18, 2021, 09:52:17 pm »
I think I'm gonna beg, borrow, or buy me a boat ride
from St Helens to north Sauvie Island.
You know you can just pedal to Collins Beach if that is what you are after.  ;)
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