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General Discussion / Re: Flats while touring
« Last post by Inge on Today at 02:46:25 am »
Does anyone know for how long after a package of Tear-Aid is opened/ / or if getting a roll - it is still okay to use. I heard something of about 2 years.

Would be great to hear experiences on this for that would help me decide whether to gett a roll or a package (12"x 3").

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Food Talk / Re: Eating well on tour.
« Last post by froze on May 25, 2020, 11:52:26 pm »

But on the salt thing,

My thing is that I susceptable to kidney stones, and too much salt leads to that sort of thing, problem is I have no way of telling if I got too much salt or not enough, so I would rather error on the side of not getting enough.  Getting a kidney stone while on a tour would not be a good thing!
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General Discussion / Re: The Katy Trail- What tires?
« Last post by mzimmerm on May 25, 2020, 10:29:38 pm »
Thank you so much Aggie!
Really appreciate it!!!
BTW- so are you a Texas A&M Aggie?!
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General Discussion / Re: The Katy Trail- What tires?
« Last post by aggie on May 25, 2020, 07:55:54 pm »
I rode it a couple of years ago using Armadillo 30's and had no problems.  Like John wrote if it is wet/muddy it can be a problem regardless of the size of the tire.   Last time I looked there were still some areas that were closed.  Check out this web site before you go.

https://katytrailmo.com/katy-trail-closures-and-conditions-spring-2020/
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General Discussion / Re: The Katy Trail- What tires?
« Last post by mzimmerm on May 25, 2020, 06:29:28 pm »
Thanks John. Makes perfect sense.
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General Discussion / Re: The Katy Trail- What tires?
« Last post by John Nettles on May 25, 2020, 06:12:15 pm »
I have ridden the Katy a couple of times.  I would go with 32 road tread and you will be fine for 98% of it.  There are a few soft spots here and there but otherwise it is packed finely crushed granite.  The main drag is if it is wet.

Be sure to check out the state's KATY website as there are a couple of detours due to the flooding last year.  Some of the detours have noteworthy hills.

Tailwinds, John
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We are still on for departing Yorktown Westboundfor 2wks May 29-june12. It seems we are the first on the forum to do so. Going by RV is making it easier, as is the limited commitment to 2wks. Then we come home until at least July 1, then may pick it up again (at the KY endpoint ) for another 2-3wks. I know this sounds like a very odd way to do the TA but my wife is a non-cyclist, going without her isn’t anything Either of us would want (How odd: husband and wife who don’t like being apart, I know!) and we both get homesick. So little 2-3wk sections work for us. Whether we finish in 2020 or not is unknown, but damn it, we will start!

Tim
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General Discussion / The Katy Trail- What tires?
« Last post by mzimmerm on May 25, 2020, 05:56:47 pm »
We are preparing to ride The Katy Trail in Missouri starting June 7th. We have “gravel” bikes that can accommodate 35’s and more- but we don’t want too big to avoid excess drag. What tires would be recommended?
30’s with Road tread?
35’s with knobby tread?
Thoughts?
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Food Talk / Re: Eating well on tour.
« Last post by staehpj1 on May 25, 2020, 05:30:53 pm »
I agree with you on the cost -- you can often eat at a diner (and interact with the locals) for about the price of a freeze dried meal.  And the diner tastes a whole lot better!

But on the salt thing, I once described a baked potato on tour as a salt delivery vehicle.  I found I needed to concentrate on getting enough salt (along with fluids and carbs) to deal with long, hot days in the saddle.  One of my enjoyable memories from my first tour is sitting down with my daughter in a restaurant, taking a bite, and both of us reached for the salt shaker.  It's kind of like how tight do you torque a bolt: shake, taste, shake some more, and when it tastes too salty, don't put that last shake of salt on next time.
I am in pretty much the same camp as Pat.  I like salty food and more so on tour.

I will go a bit further and say that most freeze dried meals I have had are actually downright nasty tasting.  Apparently they don't need to be though since I have had some very good ones from hiker boxes left by European hikers.  If I remember correctly the labels appeared to be in French and unlike any I have purchased in the US they were actually very tasty.
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Food Talk / Re: Eating well on tour.
« Last post by Pat Lamb on May 25, 2020, 11:54:53 am »
I agree with you on the cost -- you can often eat at a diner (and interact with the locals) for about the price of a freeze dried meal.  And the diner tastes a whole lot better!

But on the salt thing, I once described a baked potato on tour as a salt delivery vehicle.  I found I needed to concentrate on getting enough salt (along with fluids and carbs) to deal with long, hot days in the saddle.  One of my enjoyable memories from my first tour is sitting down with my daughter in a restaurant, taking a bite, and both of us reached for the salt shaker.  It's kind of like how tight do you torque a bolt: shake, taste, shake some more, and when it tastes too salty, don't put that last shake of salt on next time.
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