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General Discussion / Re: West to East coast tandem tour with hotels?
« Last post by John Nettles on November 29, 2022, 07:21:13 pm »
Thanks! That is very helpful.

Avoiding the I-80 if it means we'd need to ride the portion you described as a 125 mile stretch with 3600' of climbing from Lander, WY, to Rawlins, WY might be worth it. We could definitely do that in a day as long as it was followed by some easier days. The 3,600' of elevation gain will definitely be challenging for us, but spread out over 125 miles makes it sound like it's probably not too much sustained steep climbing.

Thanks again,

Michael
I see you are riding in late September.  You should definitely consider the length of daylight.  On October 1st, Landers only has 11 hours 45 minutes of daylight.  July 1st has 15 hours 17 minutes.  Can you average (including stops) 11 miles an hour?  That means if you have just 1 hour of non-riding (pretty unlikely) your required average jumps to 11.6mph.  Sure it is doable if conditions favor you but what if you have a mechanical or a headwind?  Not trying to dissuade you; just want to ensure you are truly capable of doing it.

Totally agree about booking your West Yellowstone thru Jackson accommodations way in advance.  Which is another pain as you have to keep a schedule. You probably will be able to get a room but it might be one of the $450/night rooms.
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General Discussion / Re: West to East coast tandem tour with hotels?
« Last post by Melgar on November 29, 2022, 07:11:17 pm »
You will need to book your accommodations in Yellowstone National Park way, way, way in advance. Like now.

Do you think this is true even if we're passing through there during non-peak season, probably late Sept or early Oct? Or is it mainly a problem during the summer?

Thanks,
Michael
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General Discussion / Re: West to East coast tandem tour with hotels?
« Last post by John Nelson on November 29, 2022, 07:07:39 pm »
You will need to book your accommodations in Yellowstone National Park way, way, way in advance. Like now.
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General Discussion / Re: West to East coast tandem tour with hotels?
« Last post by Melgar on November 29, 2022, 07:03:18 pm »
Thanks! That is very helpful.

Avoiding the I-80 if it means we'd need to ride the portion you described as a 125 mile stretch with 3600' of climbing from Lander, WY, to Rawlins, WY might be worth it. We could definitely do that in a day as long as it was followed by some easier days. The 3,600' of elevation gain will definitely be challenging for us, but spread out over 125 miles makes it sound like it's probably not too much sustained steep climbing.

Thanks again,

Michael
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General Discussion / Re: West to East coast tandem tour with hotels?
« Last post by John Nettles on November 29, 2022, 06:49:43 pm »
First, welcome to the ACA Forums!

It is possible to do indoor only accommodations the entire way on almost all the routes BUT you need to plan carefully AND be willing to go substantially off route in order to do it. 
For instance, the TransAm route (a fantastic route) has a 125 mile stretch with 3600' of climbing from Lander, WY, to Rawlins, WY.  It can be done if you start real early on a late June day (long daylight) if the wind is favorable (it "usually" is in that direction).

However, if you leave the TA route in Jackson, WY, and head south toward Rock City and then take Interstate 80 (legal and the traffic volume is relatively low and you have a full shoulder) to Rawlins, the longest stretch without a hotel is from Pinedale to Rock City (102 miles with 1316' of climbing).  The big drawback is that riding on I-80 is not overly enjoyable.  Again, legal but blah.

My point is you can do it if you are willing to do some work arounds.  Wishing you a wonderful journey!

Tailwinds, John
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General Discussion / West to East coast tandem tour with hotels?
« Last post by Melgar on November 29, 2022, 06:14:22 pm »
My wife and I are beginning to look into planning a cross country (US) tandem trip from the West Coast to the East Coast. We rode from the Canadian border to our house in Los Angeles this summer (2022) and had a great trip. It was 1,750 miles in total, but we were able to plan the route in a way that allowed us to stay in hotels the entire trip. Our longest day was 80 miles and we rode a few days as little as 35 miles.

Is it possible to plan a route across the US that has hotels & motels spaced closely enough to accomplish this, assuming that we prefer distances of 50-70 miles per day, but can do 100-110 miles if there's no other option as long as it's not also a ton of climbing.

Looking at the ACA routes, I can see that they have several cross-country routes available, but it's not clear to me that they include stops where there will be motels/hotels or just camping options.

Thanks for any help you can offer...

Michael
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General Discussion / Re: Continental gator skin bicycle tires.
« Last post by OHRider on November 29, 2022, 08:46:45 am »
I put a set of Gatorskin's on my road bike this year- 700x25. No problems so far but mileage isn't that high either.  I stopped using Continental 4000's in the last couple of years because I kept getting sidewall damage and subsequent flats- as you mentioned the sidewalls seemed to have little material in them. Once a sidewall is damaged I scrap the tire (I'd put a dollar bill in the area to get me home if needed).

I know a lot of people swear by Gatorskin's but I also hear complaints about a rough ride.  My road bike is titanium with carbon fork and seatstay's and I think it is a very good ride even with the Gatorskin's.

I'll likely try a set on my gravel / touring setup after they wear out.

PS our NE Ohio roads are typically pretty crappy with more than our share of potholes.
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General Discussion / Shipping bike home from St. Augustine?
« Last post by stevey on November 29, 2022, 07:00:07 am »
How are y’all shipping your bikes home from St. Augustine after Southern Tier? Is there a bike shop that ACA members tend to use that can box and ship?
We’re a few days to the finish on our tandem. We could box it ourselves if need, but would be happy to pay someone. We won’t be flying directly home, so flying with it won’t be practical.
Last year at the end of the TransAm, we had Village Bicycles in Newport News box and ship the bike. They did a great job at reasonable price and it saved us time and hassle.
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With so many different terms for bicycle touring over the years, I would think introducing a new one would be a temporary thing. People would use it and then start using something else other words. I hardly ever gave it any thought. For me it was just a matter of fixing the racks to the bike and the painters to the racks and loading and going. Whatever people called it formally was unknown for me. I just wanted to get going. Bicycle touring, sport touring, bike packing. It's all good with me.
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General Discussion / Continental gator skin bicycle tires.
« Last post by Westinghouse on November 28, 2022, 09:21:19 pm »
When the first set of Continental gator skin bicycle tires arrived in the mail, I thought I had been taken. They were very light. The side walls felt almost like paper. The contact part of the tire was thin. Nothing at all like a schwalbe Marathon which I had come to trust. I decided the gator skin tires would be good for running around locally, and that was all. They looked substandard and cheap. However, I have had a complete change of mind about those tires since then. I just finished a bicycling tour of about 1300 miles. On the front rim was mounted a 700x32 continental gator skin. It had about 50 miles on it before it was used on this tour. It went through gravel, broke and glass, sticks and stones, berries, cones and all other manner of debris found on sidewalks and roads in America. Quite a few times the glass crunched and broke under this tire. It has held up and withstood all that. The only puncture came from long distances on the interstate highways in Arizona and New Mexico. Those wires flatted the back tire also which was much thicker and beefier than the gator skin. Interstate wires will flat marathons and Marathon supreme. Spend too much time on the interstate and you will find a wire in your tire. The Continental gator skin tire is stronger and more durable than it appears to be. It is lightweight, strong, and for its size and weight long-lasting.
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