Author Topic: cargo trailers  (Read 15851 times)

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Offline johnsondasw

Re: cargo trailers
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2011, 10:53:20 pm »
Another reason to go with a Burley Nomad 2 wheeled trailer.  I've gone downhill fully loaded at 45 mph with no instability.  It's also much easier to pack and access your stuff than the Bob.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline Tom

Re: cargo trailers
« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2011, 04:16:10 pm »
My preference is a two wheel trailer... and it really does get down to personal preference. I've used a Radical Designs Cyclone trailer (available from www.biketrailershop.com; trailer is made in Holland) on 5 tours over the past 2 years including last summer's 3,600 miler from MT to Maine, and it has performed well.

My experience is that two wheelers are, in fact, more stable and don't "steer" the bike. Also, a single wheel setup puts a significant load on the rear dropout/triangle (since the load is distributed between there and the single wheel). A properly load-balanced two wheeler has a tongue weight that can be measured in ounces, and the rider often forgets it is there (excepting going uphill, of course).

One disadvantage of a two wheel trailer is that, on narrow roads (or off-road) or roads with a limited shoulder (like Highway 2 in Montana and ND), the trailer can get dangerously close to approaching traffic. This is particularly true if the shoulder is narrow and there are rumble strips or other obstructions. A single wheeler (like a BOB) tucks in nicely behind the rider. Still, this is the only advantage I've seen.

As to specific trailers, the Radical Designs Cyclone has a waterproof bottom (which the Burley Nomad doesn't have) and with the rain cover in place, is virtually water tight on the inside. Not so the Nomad. The Cyclone also is lighter (albeit smaller) and has a simpler mounting mechanism. It also features two wheel positions- one when connected to the bike and another when used in airports/etc. like a large, wheeled piece of luggage. It is, however, more costly than the Nomad.

I've had to make some adjustments to the wheels/axles on the Cyclone to reduce side to side motion due to excess play, and the frame in my older Series II trailer is coming loose at the point where the trailer arm connects to the frame. I am, in fact, now in the process of replacing that frame with the more sturdy, redesigned Series III frame/hitch.
Tom

Offline henry

Re: cargo trailers
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2011, 06:15:08 pm »
i did 1500miles on the southern tier, it was my first tour and i went with a bob trailer, after a week i had the weight in the trailer down to about 28 lbs. i got a big apple tire and had no flats, water proof bag was great,had a greenfield kickstand, you have to be carefull when you park, so the bike and trailer does not jack knife. able to bungee extra gear on top of bag when needed. no trouble on down hills, 30mph plus, I took the extra time to load the trailer evenly, at times forgot trailer was there, great on the flats the trailer drafts behind you, slow on the up hills.i pulled it with a surly LHT, overall i had no problems, Big plus i did not relize until i was chased by quit a few dogs, some not so nice, was that they went for the trailer and not the bike.

Offline mikeedgar

Re: cargo trailers
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2011, 08:08:11 pm »
I used a Burley Nomad for my first 3000 mile tour. I like the fact that it breaks down for shipping or baggage without tools. It tracks perfectly and I never had a problem going downhill. The low tongue weight means tires last longer and you can ride a somewhat lighter bike. No, it is not waterproof, so I put everything in large ziplock bags. I stayed in motels a few times and it was no problem rolling it down inside hallways. The only hassle was narrow roads with rumble strips. The Nomad was the right choice for me.

Offline Twoteller

Re: cargo trailers
« Reply #19 on: October 23, 2011, 10:13:05 pm »
This is all helpful to us.

Offline waynemyer

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Re: cargo trailers
« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2011, 09:55:36 am »
Also, a single wheel setup puts a significant load on the rear dropout/triangle (since the load is distributed between there and the single wheel). A properly load-balanced two wheeler has a tongue weight that can be measured in ounces, and the rider often forgets it is there (excepting going uphill, of course).
Those statements make no sense.

A bicycle is designed to bear load at the dropouts/fork ends. Whether it is just a rider, or panniers, or a trailer, adding load to the bicycle at the fork ends is the best place to do so.

And tongue weight: There is a reason why 60% of the mass should be forward of the axle in any trailer. If tongue weight of a loaded bicycle trailer is as low as you imply, the trailer will porpoise and cause oscillation and sway. With a trailer such as the BOB, it is impossible to screw up the F/R distribution. With a Nomad, one would have to use conscious effort to mis-pack the trailer.

Having owned both the BOB and the Nomad, as well as a bunch of other trailers, I find that they are truly six of one and a half-dozen of the other. There are engineering tradeoffs in either design and nothing but individual experience and preference can inform a given individual as to which trailer is superior for that person's riding style and needs.
waynemyer.com
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Offline kingstumps70

Re: cargo trailers
« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2011, 03:01:16 am »
Bar ends help...trust me.But jeez take easy on the speed,especially on downhills!

Offline cara2u

Re: cargo trailers
« Reply #22 on: November 28, 2011, 01:39:35 am »
The women who crashed in the ditch unconscious for two hours was probably 130 pounds. On her second attempt she put loaded front panniers on and that seemed to correct the problem. Bike geometry in relation to the weght is critical.


One if the delights of touring with our Nomads is using the extra rack for luggage as a table top for preparing foods Ususally we can find abandoned coraplast signs ready to be
to be repurposed into a table for for food prep and cooking.
James2u

Offline johnsondasw

Re: cargo trailers
« Reply #23 on: December 15, 2011, 08:44:25 pm »
     
   I have over 10,000 miles on my Burley Nomad two wheel trailer and never any control or tipping issues and never once concerned myself with weight distribution.
James

That's my choice for everything form a multi-week tour to a quick trip to the local grocery.  It's worked very well for both.
May the wind be at your back!