Author Topic: Tales of Calamity and Woe  (Read 13136 times)

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Offline hikerjer

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2021, 10:48:05 pm »
You guys are making me paranoid. Never had any mjor problems but now I'm worried.

Offline Nyimbo

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2021, 09:52:47 pm »
Made me laugh to see this post go from dates 2012 to 2021.  ;-)

Offline HobbesOnTour

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2021, 08:32:07 am »
Does selling up everything I own, paying off all debts, packing up the bike and heading off on a big, once in a lifetime trip only to get stranded on the other side of the world due to a pandemic count as a tale of calamity and woe?  :D

In my experience, some of my best and most memorable experiences have been the result of what some would call "calamity and woe"!

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2021, 05:46:18 pm »
Does selling up everything I own, paying off all debts, packing up the bike and heading off on a big, once in a lifetime trip only to get stranded on the other side of the world due to a pandemic count as a tale of calamity and woe?  :D

In my experience, some of my best and most memorable experiences have been the result of what some would call "calamity and woe"!

Yes that qualifies. That little microbe threw a wrench into your plans. That is one hell of a calamity.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2021, 11:28:51 am »
I was on a loaded bicycle tour from southeast coastal Florida to San Diego, California. I did complete that tour ok, but it was what happened along the way that was more like calamitous. One example of it happened maybe 30 times before I began to notice it. After I became aware of it I watched for it, and sure enough it was for real. Every time I crossed onto any kind of bridge, motor vehicles would appear and cross that first expansion crack at the exact same instant I did. This happened at every bridge across the continent. Even on back roads on Sundays where you might see only one or two vehicles every thirty minutes, they appeared and came three abreast with me at every bridge. However, what was more disturbing than knowing it was planned, timed and coordinated were the loud, ear splitting, penetrating noises they made hitting those cracks. It was extremely unusual. I had bicycled through China. I had bicycled through some of the most densely populated areas in the world, but I had never heard anything even remotely like it.

There was another matter of woe, if you want to call it that. I used the side lanes right of the white line always when they were there. Intermittently there would be an obstruction in the side lane that could not be ridden over. It might be a two by four with nails in it. A piece of ply wood with nails sticking up. A muffler. The branch of a tree. Whatever. There were many and varied. It was always every time in a place where I could not cycle past it on the right. That meant I had to turn left to get on the main motorized part of the road, go past the obstruction, and get back into the side lane. That is a simple easy solution, unless vehicles suddenly show up at the same exact instant you start to pass the thing in the path. They came three abreast with me at every obstacle I came to, every one all the way across the continent, every one, even on the most sparsely traveled back roads. Obviously timed and coordinated.

It was the same trip. I was cycling west on Hwy 78 in California near the town of Glamis. Two unusual looking tractor trailer trucks came along, one going east and the other going west. They came exactly three abreast with me on a narrow, two-lane road with no side lane. A while later came the same two trucks and the same three abreast with them. That happened maybe five or six times.

One thing about these vehicles. All had license plates that were somehow obscured. The most obvious example was a tag that had a piece of black something fastened over it. The others were difficult to read because they had been fixed to be that way.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2021, 07:07:12 pm by Westinghouse »

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2021, 03:27:15 pm »
Made me laugh to see this post go from dates 2012 to 2021.  ;-)
It's called a Zombie Thread.

Offline Vern

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #21 on: March 12, 2021, 09:36:29 am »
I was on the Northern Tier, about 30 miles outside of dickinson, and I popped a spoke below the nipple. Had a replacement spoke but no spare nipple. Ziptied the broken spoke to another spoke and kept riding to my day's destination, Assumption Abby, a Benedictine abbey in Richardson. Father Odo greeted me and said he'd help me fix the issue. He happened to have spare bike parts--from 20 years back. We had a great conversation while we fixed the rim. Talked about the nature of prayer, etc. Thank goodness calamity happens, because it allows us to receive the generosity of others.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2021, 12:33:24 am »
I cannot imagine how minor problems with spokes and equipment equate with calamity and woe, but OK.

Offline Vern

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #23 on: March 30, 2021, 09:46:31 am »
A broken rear wheel, and a week's ride to the nearest bike shop? Felt calamitous to me, but maybe that's just me.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Tales of Calamity and Woe
« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2021, 06:14:00 am »
A broken rear wheel, and a week's ride to the nearest bike shop? Felt calamitous to me, but maybe that's just me.

Actually, calamity is designated for great and sudden damage, a disaster. If we use the word calamity for minor, easily remedied, small problems, what word can we use for real calamities? War is calamity. The great depression was a calamity. The word is supposed to carry a sense of great loss or harm or damage. The question asked for calamity and woe. Here are answers about mechanical problems.

Actually all those breakedowns on a long bicycle tour, transcontinental, may be a calamity to the will and drive to keep moving forward. I always hated mechanical problems. Every time I began a new tour I changed all these parts. cables, brake pads, tires, tubes, wheels, chain, bearings, bottom bracket cartridge, pedals. I did preventive maintenance to keep my tours as uncalamitous as possible.