Author Topic: Best Foods for Training  (Read 16972 times)

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Offline SpencerWhite

Re: Best Foods for Training
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2022, 06:46:41 pm »
It’s better to eat more foods that contain a high quantity of proteins and calories. This will give you more energy and more healing capacity for the muscles.
You can also check out peptides. They are like an easier version of proteins. This molecule is shorter than the protein one and is more easily absorbable in your body. Some of these peptides have extended healing properties and are good for your muscles and skin. I usually use peptides from https://paradigmpeptides.com/, and I can recommend them. I started feeling better after having them a couple of times, and now I think that I will continue to take them in the future.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2022, 04:42:58 pm by SpencerWhite »

Offline canalligators

Re: Best Foods for Training
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2022, 07:26:52 pm »
There is no silver bullet.

Balanced diet, enough hydration, distrust info from people selling things.

The placebo effect is real. If you think it helps, it just might.

Anecdotes are not data.  Correlation is not cause and effect.  Random clinical trials are the best method to test things.

Science and common sense, folks.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Best Foods for Training
« Reply #17 on: April 29, 2022, 10:56:27 am »
A word of warning - do not suddenly change your diet for your trip. Whatever you plan to eat, make sure that your stomach can handle it and that you will like it the way you will be preparing it during the trip. I shipped myself a bunch of grits during my thru-hike and dumped them in a hiker box because there we not as good without the butter and sausage I was eating them with at home - I grew to hate them   :-\

Suddenly taking a lot of supplements can be risky and some build up over time in your system. Perhaps a daily multi-vitamin, but otherwise try to not shock your system. Also, listen to your cravings, they are telling you something. People on a low-sodium diet may suddenly start to experience things like leg cramps (it happens to my wife) once you are riding long hours and sweating. You may have to increase your normal salt and electrolyte intake. Talk to your doctor before you set out if you are planning on adding supplements and I would not change medications just before your trip.

Finally, I carry Imodium when I travel because gastric upset can really put you in danger if not treated in the wilderness.
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline loonyy

Re: Best Foods for Training
« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2022, 12:28:36 am »
Agree with the others about balanced diet, proteins and high-quality carbs. Also do not forget to stay hydrated during trainings and in ordinary life. It would be great to visit a doctor to have your personal plan of meals

Offline dvdwmth

Re: Best Foods for Training
« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2022, 11:23:58 pm »
I'm a big fan of beans and rice, biking or at home.

I'm sensitive to excessive refined carb type foods (french bread, white pasta being the worst) but rice and beans sits very well with me and I do not experience blood sugar fluctuations that can really take the wind out of your sails. Even better if you can sort out brown rice, but without something like a dehydrator brown takes too long to cook.

There are numerous variation in how you can eat them. I usually do black or pinto beans. Rice and beans with cheese  in a bowl, as grain bowls with other things, as burritos, with meat or chicken, or fish, and so on.

I plan to get a dehydrator in the near future and try drying the beans to create a quick meal. Instant rice is great if you need to conserve fuel. when you have access to produce, a simple salsa really improves the dish.