Author Topic: importance of componentry  (Read 10973 times)

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Offline jrswenberger

Re: importance of componentry
« Reply #15 on: August 28, 2014, 08:17:33 am »
I'm looking for a decent endurance or touring type drop bar bike.  I want to do a tour.  I also want my bike to be a good commuter and everyday rider.  I have absolutely no intention of racing or much of anything involving speed.  More interested in miles.  I have myself somewhat locked into Tiagra at a minimum and 105 at best.  Is this really necessary?  I know the lower I go, the less crisp the shifting will be.  A local dealer told me I wouldn't notice much difference between Sora and Tiagra, but that I would from Sora to 105.  I thought Tiagra was essentially the same thing as 105, with 105 being a cleaner and prettier look.  Would Sora or Claris suffice for a budget bike?  How much more often will the budget Claris or Sora go out of adjustment as compared to Tiagra/105?      THANKS

Keep in mind that all components are easily replaceable. Over time, you will wear them out or they will break at some point.

Recommendation - buy the middle of the pack parts for best value, upgrade later if the performance doesn't match your expectations/needs. Spend more time riding and figuring out what works for you than worrying about the pieces. For the type of riding you've described, properly setup components of any price range will make little to no difference.

Enjoy the ride,
Jay
ACA Life Member 368

Offline JDFlood

Re: importance of componentry
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2014, 05:30:08 pm »
Choosing the right componentry is important and it depends on your personality and your means. I enjoy high performance componentry, to me it adds to the enjoyment of touring. Hence, if I chose a middle of the line components, I will quickly begin to wonder if the more expensive one would perform better and end up buying both. So, for me it would be a stupid decision to go middle of the road. This is how I discovered the difference between Ultegra and Dura ace. I got a nice standard bike (with Ultegra) while I was waiting for my custom bike to be built (with Dura ace). So, I ended up riding them alternatively. The cranks flexed less, the shifting was significantly smoother and quicker, etc. So, I put Dura Ace triples on all my touring bikes, and I am reminded how much better they perform every time I get on one of the bikes (either the Ultegra or Dura Ace). So, I agree, get on with riding, but if you are like me, then get the best componentry possible, because it is nearly forever (I ride around 5,000 miles a year spread across 8 bikes). If cost is your highest consideration, choose something else. This is one of the reason forums are here, so people with different perspectives can voice their opinion and a reader can pick which paradigm to relate to.

On a side note;
Unfortunately Shimano no longer makes triples, but they do make Dura Ace bar end (showing Dura Ace is not only race componentry). So to me that suggests the the newer gear with thinner chains was not up to touring (hopefully just yet), and they will some day. Maybe just a pipe dream, but I may wish to buy another touring bike and sure would like Dura Ace.

Offline DaveB

Re: importance of componentry
« Reply #17 on: August 28, 2014, 05:44:28 pm »
Unfortunately Shimano no longer makes triples, but they do make Dura Ace bar end (showing Dura Ace is not only race componentry). So to me that suggests the the newer gear with thinner chains was not up to touring (hopefully just yet), and they will some day. Maybe just a pipe dream, but I may wish to buy another touring bike and sure would like Dura Ace.
Shimano does indeed make triples, they just don't make them in groups their experiences tells them don't sell to tourists.   The 105 FC-5703 is a triple and has a 74 mm BCD for the granny ring so it will take down to a 24T chainring and several of their MTB and Trekking cranks are available as suitable triples.  Also, those "Dura Ace" barends are intended more for time trial bikes aero bars than for touring use.  Again, Dura Ace isn't bought by tourists.


Offline tsteven4

Re: importance of componentry
« Reply #18 on: August 28, 2014, 08:17:00 pm »
Quote
Also, those "Dura Ace" barends are intended more for time trial bikes aero bars than for touring use.  Again, Dura Ace isn't bought by tourists.

We have three touring bikes in the house with Shimano SL-BS77 Dura-Ace 7700 Bar End Shifters (9 speed), one of which just got upgraded to 9 speed this year.  Bruce Gordon used them on his bikes for years, I don't know what he is using currently.  The shifters work very well on our touring bikes (22-32-44, 11-32).  I don't have any experience with the 10 speed version.

Offline DaveB

Re: importance of componentry
« Reply #19 on: August 28, 2014, 09:54:53 pm »
Quote
Also, those "Dura Ace" barends are intended more for time trial bikes aero bars than for touring use.  Again, Dura Ace isn't bought by tourists.

We have three touring bikes in the house with Shimano SL-BS77 Dura-Ace 7700 Bar End Shifters (9 speed), one of which just got upgraded to 9 speed this year.  Bruce Gordon used them on his bikes for years, I don't know what he is using currently.  The shifters work very well on our touring bikes (22-32-44, 11-32).  I don't have any experience with the 10 speed version.
You are not the main market for Shimano's 9 and 10-speed barends.  Yes they work fine and are suitable for your use but if it had to rely on the touring market, Shimano would have dropped them long ago.