Author Topic: Looking for a combination road / light touring bike  (Read 11295 times)

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Offline hirundo

Re: Looking for a combination road / light touring bike
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2015, 08:25:38 pm »
Look at the frames offered by Velo Orange

Offline RonK

Re: Looking for a combination road / light touring bike
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2015, 10:06:05 pm »

I am dabbling with the idea of getting a Lynskey titanium bike and am waffling between an Urbanskey, Sportive Disc and Cooper CX. If I go that route it would be for a long term bike, so I need to think about what I would want to ride as a 65 year old as well.
If you have the budget I say go for it Helena. You will be delighted with the quality, finish and ride, and if it's going to your long-term bike then the outlay is easy to justify.
I have two ti touring bikes - complete and ready to tour both weigh at least 3kg less than their equivalent in steel, and both are a pleasure to ride vs the lifeless steel-framed slugs they replace. 
With an eye to the future you may want to choose a Lynskey with a more relaxed geometry.

Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Offline RussSeaton

Re: Looking for a combination road / light touring bike
« Reply #17 on: November 17, 2015, 12:00:27 am »
I have two ti touring bikes - complete and ready to tour both weigh at least 3kg less than their equivalent in steel, and both are a pleasure to ride vs the lifeless steel-framed slugs they replace.

Hmmm.  At least 3 kilograms is 6.6 pounds or more.  Assuming your touring bikes had similar parts and racks and bags before and after you changed from steel to titanium frames, then the frames would weigh about 3+ pounds for the titanium frame, and about 9+ pounds for the steel frame.  I'm pretty sure the steel bikes sold by K-Mart in the 1970s did not have 9 pound frames.  To get to 9 pounds you would need to weld up some plumbing pipe into a frame and fill the tubes with lead.  Or use solid steel bars to make your frame.  But I'm pretty sure all bike frames are made with hollow tubes.  Not solid.

I have a titanium Litespeed bike.  Its titanium frame weighs around 1300 or 1400 grams.  3 pounds or so.  I've ridden it on a few lengthy rides.  Two brevet series and a 1000k and PBP in 2007 for starters.  And a few shorter rides too.  Its a fine bike.  I also have bikes made out of carbon, steel, and aluminum.  I've ridden all of them on short and long rides.  They all ride fine too.

Offline HelenaEngineer

Re: Looking for a combination road / light touring bike
« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2015, 12:38:37 am »

I am dabbling with the idea of getting a Lynskey titanium bike and am waffling between an Urbanskey, Sportive Disc and Cooper CX. If I go that route it would be for a long term bike, so I need to think about what I would want to ride as a 65 year old as well.
If you have the budget I say go for it Helena. You will be delighted with the quality, finish and ride, and if it's going to your long-term bike then the outlay is easy to justify.
I have two ti touring bikes - complete and ready to tour both weigh at least 3kg less than their equivalent in steel, and both are a pleasure to ride vs the lifeless steel-framed slugs they replace. 
With an eye to the future you may want to choose a Lynskey with a more relaxed geometry.

I did go for it - the Lynskey bikes were on clearance 20% off through today, and I got the last 2015 Cooper CX - which has a more relaxed geometry than the Sportive Disc - actually quite similar to the geometry on my Cannondale SR 500. Now I just need to get some miles under my belt before March and get the bike set up to tour.

Any input on recommended tire size and input on saddles for multiple long days would be welcomed. I am thinking 700X28 might be a good choice.

Offline RonK

Looking for a combination road / light touring bike
« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2015, 03:40:10 am »
I did go for it - the Lynskey bikes were on clearance 20% off through today, and I got the last 2015 Cooper CX - which has a more relaxed geometry than the Sportive Disc - actually quite similar to the geometry on my Cannondale SR 500. Now I just need to get some miles under my belt before March and get the bike set up to tour.

Any input on recommended tire size and input on saddles for multiple long days would be welcomed. I am thinking 700X28 might be a good choice.
Good for you.
700x28 tyres would be fine. My preference is for Schwalbe Marathon Supreme as an ideal combination of grip, light weight, puncture-protection and low rolling resistance.
For a saddle, you may want to consider the Brooks Cambium C17 or perhaps C15 for stylish good looks sans a long break-in period.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2015, 03:42:44 am by RonK »
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...