Author Topic: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?  (Read 22959 times)

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Offline RussSeaton

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #45 on: November 13, 2015, 10:14:01 am »
I'm quite happy with 5 10s and pinned pedals. With that combination there's no need for cages for keeping a comfortable and efficient cadence between 98-102.

Reckon I would have to see that to believe it.  100 rpm is somewhat fast.  Every 6 tenths of a second, your leg makes a full rotation on the pedals.  Start your foot at 12 o'clock and pedal it around to the same 12 o'clock position in 6 tenths of a second.  Pedaling 100 rpm on loose pedals is possible for a second or two, no problem.  But pedaling 100 rpm on loose pedals for minutes or hours on end, ???  In ancient times the racers used toeclips and straps for the advantage of pulling back and up while pedaling.  But the clips and straps also kept their feet attached to the pedals when they pedaled at high rpms.  Pedaling at high rpm and having your feet fly off the pedals is not something you want to happen in a close group of bikes on a road.

Offline Ty0604

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #46 on: November 13, 2015, 01:42:51 pm »
I found some 2014 Pearl Izumi's at REI's warehouse in Seattle for $48 ($110 retail) because they were "last years model."

Any one own these? I bought them without doing research just due to the cost and being in rush. Wasn't what I was there for. At that price I didn't see the harm in trying them.
Instagram: tyjames0604

WI—>WA—>CO

Offline RussSeaton

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #47 on: November 13, 2015, 03:36:00 pm »
I found some 2014 Pearl Izumi's at REI's warehouse in Seattle for $48 ($110 retail) because they were "last years model."

You might want to be a bit more specific.  Pearl Izumi makes a wide assortment of shoes and clothing for bicycling.  I have shoes, shorts, tights, jerseys, and gloves made by Pearl Izumi.  I could almost do a commercial for Pearl Izumi advertising their cycling clothes.  Making the assumption you are talking about Pearl Izumi shoes, you might mention which exact model you bought.

Offline Ty0604

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #48 on: November 14, 2015, 12:36:00 am »
I found some 2014 Pearl Izumi's at REI's warehouse in Seattle for $48 ($110 retail) because they were "last years model."

You might want to be a bit more specific.  Pearl Izumi makes a wide assortment of shoes and clothing for bicycling.  I have shoes, shorts, tights, jerseys, and gloves made by Pearl Izumi.  I could almost do a commercial for Pearl Izumi advertising their cycling clothes.  Making the assumption you are talking about Pearl Izumi shoes, you might mention which exact model you bought.

Considering this is a post about shoes your assumption would be correct. I bought X-Road Fuel II but that's irrelevant. Was asking about the brand in general.
Instagram: tyjames0604

WI—>WA—>CO

Offline CanvasAndSteel

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #49 on: November 14, 2015, 08:39:05 am »
I'm quite happy with 5 10s and pinned pedals. With that combination there's no need for cages for keeping a comfortable and efficient cadence between 98-102.

Reckon I would have to see that to believe it.  100 rpm is somewhat fast.  Every 6 tenths of a second, your leg makes a full rotation on the pedals.  Start your foot at 12 o'clock and pedal it around to the same 12 o'clock position in 6 tenths of a second.  Pedaling 100 rpm on loose pedals is possible for a second or two, no problem.  But pedaling 100 rpm on loose pedals for minutes or hours on end, ???  In ancient times the racers used toeclips and straps for the advantage of pulling back and up while pedaling.  But the clips and straps also kept their feet attached to the pedals when they pedaled at high rpms.  Pedaling at high rpm and having your feet fly off the pedals is not something you want to happen in a close group of bikes on a road.
Yep, I remember the ancient times. My cycling experience goes back only to the early 80s, but at that time cages and straps were a must. The slotted cleats on my leather racing shoes had to be put in place and then belted down so as not to pop off. My canvas touring shoes had a hard rubber sole with little dimples and would slide off the pedals if not caged and strapped.

Very few people actually lift on a pedal stroke, as the force of the stroke is typically transferred from foot to foot before any lifting is done. The only time I lift is on climbs and sprints.  So it's quite possible to maintain a good quick cadence (100-105) with soft soled cycling  shoes on pinned pedals.  My guess is you haven't tried it so you're making assumptions instead of speaking from experience.

I rode nothing but cleats up to a couple years ago. I now have them only on my racer. I have Shimano Saints on my MTB, my touring bike, and my fat bike. My commuter has MKS Lambda (which are not technically pinned, but have little raised "cones" for purchase with the pedals). Cycle specific soft soled shoes with pinned pedals sans cages and straps are a viable option that will allow almost all riders to maintain the cadence they are used to with clipless systems.

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Offline CanvasAndSteel

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #50 on: November 14, 2015, 08:50:48 am »
Just to be clear, I'm in no way saying everyone should get rid of their clipless pedals and go with platform. I'm just saying its a viable option that for touring can actually simplify the how many shoes? conundrum.

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Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #51 on: November 14, 2015, 02:41:42 pm »
Just to be clear, I'm in no way saying everyone should get rid of their clipless pedals and go with platform. I'm just saying its a viable option that for touring can actually simplify the how many shoes? conundrum.

Two pairs of shoes (well, one pair of shoes and a pair of sandals) has been enough for all my tours.  It's really nice to be able to take off wet shoes after a day of riding in the rain.

And Russ is right -- feet flying off pedals is not good when riding with a group.  More than that, it can be particularly painful for a male rider any time!

Offline RussSeaton

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #52 on: November 14, 2015, 02:49:18 pm »
Considering this is a post about shoes your assumption would be correct. I bought X-Road Fuel II but that's irrelevant. Was asking about the brand in general.

The title of this thread is "Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?"  And you consider it irrelevant to mention the model of your Pearl Izumi shoes?  Hmmm.

Pearl Izumi is a fine brand.  Its a slightly premium brand.  Some brands are much more premium.  Many other names are less.  Pearl Izumi is at least average or better on most or all of the things they make.  Can't go too wrong if you choose Pearl Izumi.  It costs more than the lesser names.  But is not quite as expensive as the extreme premium names.

Offline CanvasAndSteel

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #53 on: November 14, 2015, 03:10:09 pm »
Just to be clear, I'm in no way saying everyone should get rid of their clipless pedals and go with platform. I'm just saying its a viable option that for touring can actually simplify the how many shoes? conundrum.

Two pairs of shoes (well, one pair of shoes and a pair of sandals) has been enough for all my tours.  It's really nice to be able to take off wet shoes after a day of riding in the rain.

And Russ is right -- feet flying off pedals is not good when riding with a group.  More than that, it can be particularly painful for a male rider any time!
Absolutely, re having dry shoes to change into.  But in about two years of riding platforms almost daily--including singletrack--I've had me feet come off the pedals once. A little technique goes a long way.

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Offline Ty0604

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #54 on: November 14, 2015, 03:12:38 pm »
Considering this is a post about shoes your assumption would be correct. I bought X-Road Fuel II but that's irrelevant. Was asking about the brand in general.

The title of this thread is "Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?"  And you consider it irrelevant to mention the model of your Pearl Izumi shoes?  Hmmm.

Pearl Izumi is a fine brand.  Its a slightly premium brand.  Some brands are much more premium.  Many other names are less.  Pearl Izumi is at least average or better on most or all of the things they make.  Can't go too wrong if you choose Pearl Izumi.  It costs more than the lesser names.  But is not quite as expensive as the extreme premium names.

My question wasn't about the model of the shoes but about the brand itself. Sorry for the confusion. I had never heard of the brand before getting the shoes.

I'll be happy if they make it through my ~5,000 mile trip. For $54 I wouldn't care if I had to throw them away when I got done with my trip. Sounds like it was a good purchase.
Instagram: tyjames0604

WI—>WA—>CO

Offline Ty0604

Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
« Reply #55 on: November 14, 2015, 03:14:30 pm »
Just to be clear, I'm in no way saying everyone should get rid of their clipless pedals and go with platform. I'm just saying its a viable option that for touring can actually simplify the how many shoes? conundrum.

Two pairs of shoes (well, one pair of shoes and a pair of sandals) has been enough for all my tours.  It's really nice to be able to take off wet shoes after a day of riding in the rain.

And Russ is right -- feet flying off pedals is not good when riding with a group.  More than that, it can be particularly painful for a male rider any time!
Absolutely, re having dry shoes to change into.  But in about two years of riding platforms almost daily--including singletrack--I've had me feet come off the pedals once. A little technique goes a long way.

That happened to me once before I got cages. Not only did I slam my parts down on the seat but the pedal tore my leg up pretty bad when it slipped off.
Instagram: tyjames0604

WI—>WA—>CO