Author Topic: Eating well on tour.  (Read 18595 times)

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Offline J Griffin

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2019, 10:07:20 pm »
I chuckle...I've spent lots of time in Thailand on R&R, and both cook Thai food, and love it!  And with some of the stuff from Packit Gourmet's items from their general grocery section, I've been able to put together stuff like my favorite-pad prew wan-sweet & sour stir fry.  The problem is, I can't find this in our local restaurants that's truly "Thai hot"...The waiter asks, and I tell him "thai hot" and it always comes back just a little, well....less than I remember!  When I was in Naval Special Warfare, we needed a Vietnamese lady to come cook for us for about a week prior to a long range patrol into "indian country".  Otherwise, believe it or not, the other side could actually smell us!  It was a "good thing" to blend into the landscape.  She had this fish sauce called nuc mom, a fish sauce, that if you spilled it on the floor, it would just continue to burn through to China!!!! ;D

Offline BikePacker

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #16 on: November 04, 2019, 10:59:51 am »
....I lost half-a-pound a day on a trans-am ride, which I believe would be about a 1500 kcal-per-day deficit. 
Yup ...same here ... can nearly calibrate anticipated weight loss,
e.g., about 1 lb per hundred miles (i.e., I typically travel very heavily loaded).
Meanwhile, back to OP thesis .... I frequent Subway shops ....
buy a couple heavy on protein & veggies (low on mayo : ) type footl-o-n-g-s ...
eat in and then pack out the remainder.
For me, works well with Subway shops being in so many small towns.

Offline pn.isc8888

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2020, 09:56:35 am »
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Offline froze

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2020, 07:20:27 pm »
I won't eat that backpacking pre made meals, they're far too expensive, and loaded with too much salt. Most of that food is $10 to $15 a meal, heck, you might as well pedal to a restaurant!  My meals cost me around $2 to $4 dollars and they're tasty, nutritional, and not loaded with as much salt.

By the way, there is a McDonalds hack for breakfast.  Anytime you order something with an egg it's a frozen folded egg patty that came in a packet of eggs, but you can ask for a "round" egg, and this is an actual poached egg formed in a round ring to keep its shape.

There is another McDonalds hack that I've done on occasion, order a chocolate shake and a shot of espresso, then mix the espresso into the shake, it taste a lot better than Arby's mocha shake, and if you like your coffee flavor stronger simply get two shots.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2020, 11:54:53 am »
I agree with you on the cost -- you can often eat at a diner (and interact with the locals) for about the price of a freeze dried meal.  And the diner tastes a whole lot better!

But on the salt thing, I once described a baked potato on tour as a salt delivery vehicle.  I found I needed to concentrate on getting enough salt (along with fluids and carbs) to deal with long, hot days in the saddle.  One of my enjoyable memories from my first tour is sitting down with my daughter in a restaurant, taking a bite, and both of us reached for the salt shaker.  It's kind of like how tight do you torque a bolt: shake, taste, shake some more, and when it tastes too salty, don't put that last shake of salt on next time.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2020, 05:30:53 pm »
I agree with you on the cost -- you can often eat at a diner (and interact with the locals) for about the price of a freeze dried meal.  And the diner tastes a whole lot better!

But on the salt thing, I once described a baked potato on tour as a salt delivery vehicle.  I found I needed to concentrate on getting enough salt (along with fluids and carbs) to deal with long, hot days in the saddle.  One of my enjoyable memories from my first tour is sitting down with my daughter in a restaurant, taking a bite, and both of us reached for the salt shaker.  It's kind of like how tight do you torque a bolt: shake, taste, shake some more, and when it tastes too salty, don't put that last shake of salt on next time.
I am in pretty much the same camp as Pat.  I like salty food and more so on tour.

I will go a bit further and say that most freeze dried meals I have had are actually downright nasty tasting.  Apparently they don't need to be though since I have had some very good ones from hiker boxes left by European hikers.  If I remember correctly the labels appeared to be in French and unlike any I have purchased in the US they were actually very tasty.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 05:35:28 pm by staehpj1 »

Offline froze

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2020, 11:52:26 pm »

But on the salt thing,

My thing is that I susceptable to kidney stones, and too much salt leads to that sort of thing, problem is I have no way of telling if I got too much salt or not enough, so I would rather error on the side of not getting enough.  Getting a kidney stone while on a tour would not be a good thing!

Offline staehpj1

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #22 on: May 26, 2020, 06:51:59 am »

But on the salt thing,

My thing is that I susceptable to kidney stones, and too much salt leads to that sort of thing, problem is I have no way of telling if I got too much salt or not enough, so I would rather error on the side of not getting enough.  Getting a kidney stone while on a tour would not be a good thing!
Yeah, I can see that.  I had a kidney stone problem many (30+) years ago and passing stones is no fun.  My doc said that in my case salt wasn't a likely contributor to the problem.  I forget the details, but as I recall I think it depends on the type of stones.

Offline froze

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #23 on: May 26, 2020, 09:48:19 am »
I don't recall the medical mumbo jumbo about my stones either, I know I have to limit my salt, acidic from citrus foods (oranges and the like), and sodas (the soda thing doesn't bother me!); I even have to watch my coffee intake, so I now only drink coffee on the weekends and only about a 1/2 a cup, though when I go bike camping I'll make a pour over every morning, there are just some things in life you have to enjoy!  I've had 8 occurrences of stones in the last 20 years, with the last 3 coming about 3 months apart from each other, and one of those they had to go in and take it out.  I haven't had a stone attack in about 8 months.  It will be interesting to see if I get another stone due to drinking Nuun vs Gatorade when I ride, the Nuun has a bit less salt; plus I cut out all citrus fruit.

Offline Susanne

Re: Eating well on tour.
« Reply #24 on: September 03, 2020, 08:52:24 am »
I spent 20 days on the Pacific Coast route in 2005 and gained 10 pounds!  Of course my thighs each increased by and inch in circumference.  I was always hungry after the first 5 days or so and just ate all I wanted to for fuel.

I have had similar experiences - it always amazes me.