Author Topic: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes  (Read 10262 times)

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Offline Jack19073

2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« on: January 26, 2016, 10:34:03 pm »
Hi First time on this forum. Has anyone ridden or own a 2016 Cannondale touring 1 or ultimate. I am looking for a new credit card touring bike for road riding from 50 to 1000 miles. So far I am unable to find any owner reviews of these bikes. If you have ridden or you own one of these bikes I would love to hear what your riding experience has been. Thanks

Offline staehpj1

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2016, 07:43:43 am »
I have not actually seen one of the 2016 ones, but have looked over the specs.  I will say that the previous touring models were pretty nice.  I don't personally care for all of the choices they made on these bikes though.  On a touring bike Id rather have seen a smaller ring available on the crank (it doesn't look like it will take a smaller on on that crank).  DT spokes are great and it wouldn't really worry me but, I'd rather have seen them go with double butted spokes.  Oh, and I'd definitely not have chosen the Marathon Plus tires.  All of that may suit you better than it does me though.

Also I kind of wonder why a loaded touring bike for credit card touring?  Not sure how much you plan to carry, but I'd think the bike was overkill for lighter loads I'd expect for credit card touring.  Just me but once I got the weight down to even lightweight camping and cooking I started riding a sportier bike and left the loaded touring bike at home.  For me that happened at 20 pounds of gear and under, which to me at least would seem to be more than would be needed for credit card touring.  Then again some folks like to carry a lot more than I would.

Offline DaveB

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2016, 09:24:58 am »
I agree that they are overkill for credit card touring and have the added disadvantage of inadequate gearing.  A 50x11 high gear is a waste on a touring bike and a 34x34, or worse, a 34x32 low gear really isn't sufficient for real loaded touring.  At the very least they should have used the Tiagra or Ulegra triple cranks with their 50/39/30 chainrings but I guess triple cranks are out of fashion and triple capable brifters  aren't available.




Offline staehpj1

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2016, 09:34:38 am »
I actually like doubles just for touring, but none of the road doubles offer a small enough inner ring IMO.  I have gotten around this on older bikes by using a triple with the outer ring removed.  A MTB double would be another option.  The road FD should shift it fine with a bit of fiddling to get the adjustment right, assuming the FD can be moved low enough on the seat tube for the smaller rings

Offline RussSeaton

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2016, 10:29:18 am »
Agree with the other posts.  The equipment on the bike seems a bit odd.  15 gauge straight spokes?  32 number is OK for unloaded touring.  But straight gauge?  Straight is 15 cents apiece cheaper than double butted at my spoke place, Dans Comp.  64 spokes times 15 cents is $9.60.  I'd happily pay $9.60 extra for 14/15 double butted spokes over straight 15 spokes.  Bad place to save a few dollars.  Tiagra 10 speed with STI is OK.  Ultegra 11 speed with STI is OK.  But the low gear required is not that good.  Disc brakes are not my choice for touring or anything else.  Some love discs.  They can have them.  The 700x40 Marathon Plus tires are great for a tandem carrying two 300 pound riders and 100 pounds of gear on a gravel road.  Both of the Cannondale touring bikes seem like a mix of road and touring where Cannondale picked the worst from each and mixed them up on a bike.  I'd also suggest picking a road bike or a heavy duty loaded touring bike.  One or the other.  Not a poor mix of the two.  Using a large saddle bag and frame bag allows you to credit card tour easily.  Adventure Cycling sells these bags under the Revelate Designs name.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2016, 06:37:35 pm by RussSeaton »

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2016, 10:47:34 am »
I think the OP is looking in the wrong places.  For credit card touring, my expectation is that the load will be light, but that the bike will be able to carry luggage (panniers, trunk pack, or one of the large saddle bags).  Cannondale's touring bikes are aimed at the loaded touring market (although, as noted, they seem to miss the mark w.r.t. gearing!).

I'd suggest looking at so-called "sport touring" bikes, or perhaps non-competition cyclocross bikes, instead.  Make sure they have eyelets to mount a rack of your choice, front or rear.  Also, keep in mind that what's not in your legs needs to be in your gears.  One last, long, steep hill at the end of a hard day is a great reason to go with lower gears (maximum 25 gear inches, I prefer 20 for the bail-out capability).

Offline dkoloko

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2016, 06:44:21 pm »
In general, credit card, randonneuring, bicycles differ from fully loaded touring bikes in having slightly lighter tubing, brifters instead of bar end shifters, slightly higher gearing, two instead of three water bottle cage mounts, narrower rims and tires, and rack braze-ons rear, but not front.

While I understand the merit of double butted spokes instead of straight gauge, they are not high on my list of desirables. I have toured many thousands of miles with straight gauge spoked wheels, factory built and built by me, without problem. I would not reject a bike because the wheels have straight gauge spokes.

Offline Jack19073

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2016, 08:24:07 pm »
Thank you for all the suggestions. I want to clarify my needs. I am a 62 year old road rider for the past 40+ years. I no longer wish to ride my road racing bike for many different reasons. I also own a 1984 Cannondale ST400 that has served me well for thousands of miles. The frame is now too tall for me to ride hence the need for a new bike. I want a bike that can be ridden in group rides at a moderate pace without being dropped. Since retiring in January 2016 my wife and I will ride as many Rail to Trails as possible (Katy, C&O /Gap, Erie Canal…), Solo rides I will do are the Natchez Trace with a left turn on the Southern Tier into Florida, Skyline Drive/Blue Ridge Parkway… Credit card touring to me means riding 8 hours a day then sleeping in a hotel with dinner being purchased. Only clothes and emergency gear will be carried on the bike. My road bike has 52/36 cranks with 11/28 so 50/34 - 11/32 -34 enables me to climb almost any incline I would encounter while carrying a light load. No bike is perfect for all conditions but I feel the Cannondale Touring will enable me to accomplish most of my goals. I apologize for not clarifying this in the beginning but this is my first post. Let me know if you feel any other bike would better suit my needs.
Wish list:
Aluminum frame
50/34 – 11/32 or 34
Rear Rack
40c tires max ( I have many other size tires)
Brifters
One bike that can accomplish most of my goals
I currently own ST400, SuperSix, Epic and Rock Hopper Mtn bikes

Offline dkoloko

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2016, 09:52:14 pm »
Rivendell Atlantis fills that niche; not so popular since price went up, but will illustrate concept; all everything bike, suitable for light touring, http://www.rivbike.com/Rivendell-Atlantis-p/f-atlantis.htm. Number of lower cost similar alternatives. It's not aluminum; very limited choices in aluminum touring bikes. Had several Cannondale touring bikes; satisfied with them, but not so I would limit myself to aluminum buying a new touring bike. The fat tubing causes problems, such as finding replacement front derailleur; also the thin walled aluminum dents easily; more problem touring than general riding.

Offline DaveB

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2016, 09:47:32 am »
Based on your "wish list" you have pretty much described those Cannondales.  If the gearing and luggage capacity meet your needs and unless their geometry is far different from what you are used to, either model should be fine. The web site doesn't give the weights but I'll assume they are not out of line with similar bikes from other makers.  Basically, the differences between the two are Tiagra vs. Ultegra, mechanical disc brakes vs hydraulic disc brakes and $1000.

Yes, there are equivalent bikes from others like Rivendell and Co-Motion but not at anywhere near the Cannondale's cost.

Offline RussSeaton

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2016, 10:36:47 am »
While I understand the merit of double butted spokes instead of straight gauge, they are not high on my list of desirables. I have toured many thousands of miles with straight gauge spoked wheels, factory built and built by me, without problem. I would not reject a bike because the wheels have straight gauge spokes.

If the wheels had 14 Gauge straight spokes, fine.  I've used 14 gauge spokes for years and miles.  But these wheels say they are 15 gauge straight spokes.  There is a difference.  Straight spokes are $10 cheaper than double butted for both wheels.  Poor place for the company to cut costs.  I'd be concerned where they cut other costs.

Wheels are very high on my list of desirables.  Wheels are one of the most important parts of a bike.  Wheels fail and you stop.  Saddle/seatpost fail, ride standing up.  Bars break, ride one handed.  Pedals break, ride one footed.  Gearing breaks, ride one speed.  Spokes break, and you may be stopped.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2016, 11:23:04 am »
Wheels are very high on my list of desirables.  Wheels are one of the most important parts of a bike.  Wheels fail and you stop.  Saddle/seatpost fail, ride standing up.  Bars break, ride one handed.  Pedals break, ride one footed.  Gearing breaks, ride one speed.  Spokes break, and you may be stopped.

While I understand the rhetorical concept of emphasis through exaggeration, this may be carrying things a bit far.  Seatpost failed, I was afraid I'd forget and sit (ouch!).  Stopped and got a lift.  Stem broke, limped five miles to local repair shop (OK, my garage).  Crank broke, rode one-footed half a mile to work and called my wife for a ride home.  Right leg ached for 2-3 days after that one.

Spoke breaks?  I've probably ridden 50-100 miles like that, with multiple breaks.  Open the brake if necessary and keep riding.  (Helps if you have a reasonable number of spokes, of course!)  The fix is to learn to tension and stress relieve a wheel, or find someone who can do it.  Either way, a wheel is ultimately a consumable item; they will wear out and can be replaced easily.

Back to the OP, I think either a touring bike or a 'cross bike could fit your needs.  Rail-trails will drive you to wider tires, although 40 is really wide for most rail trails.  If most of your riding will be on roads, that would drive me away from a hybrid -- you'll want to make sure you're flexible enough to enjoy drop bars, though.  All in all, the Cannondale Touring sounds like a reasonable choice for you.

Offline DaveB

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2016, 11:46:34 am »
I agree the alarm over the 15 ga straight spokes is unwarranted.  These are 32 Hole wheels supported by modestly deep section, rigid rims and cushioned by 40 mm tires.  They should live a very respectable life.  Also, the bike has disc brakes so a broken spoke won't even result in the rim rubbing the brake pads.  I've also ridden home on a wheel with a broken spoke and it wasn't that difficult.

I do agree it's an odd choice but I don't see it as a deal breaker. 

Offline RonK

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2016, 06:59:24 pm »
I want a bike that can be ridden in group rides at a moderate pace without being dropped.
The Cannondale Touring 1 is going to weigh in at around 30lbs or more. Hard to see you keeping up with a group of riders on lightweight road bikes.
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Offline dkoloko

Re: 2016 Cannondale Touring Bikes
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2016, 11:30:53 am »
I want a bike that can be ridden in group rides at a moderate pace without being dropped.
The Cannondale Touring 1 is going to weigh in at around 30lbs or more. Hard to see you keeping up with a group of riders on lightweight road bikes.

I thought of that. Don't know if the Cannondale weighs 30lbs or more; that's a lot; could with fenders, racks, etc, and heavy tires. Even at minimum weight, with just one rack and narrow, lightweight tires (narrow for a touring  bike), expect it to weigh 24 lb or so; decent for a touring bike, but not lightweight.