Author Topic: Practical camping advice for Route 66  (Read 2175 times)

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Offline Jason

Practical camping advice for Route 66
« on: August 01, 2016, 05:01:14 pm »
I'm looking for real world info for camping along Route 66
   Most of what I've read on the route references hotels, etc.   (I've yet to order the ACA maps, so I'm assuming options are available.)
singlespeed touring - life generally requires just one speed.
Southern Tier, TransAm, tons of places in between.

Offline John Nelson

Re: Practical camping advice for Route 66
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2016, 05:45:09 pm »
I camped along much of Bicycle Route 66 last year. Here are my stats:

I stayed with two Warm Showers hosts (my first two nights, when I was still in the greater Chicago area).
I stayed in two city parks, once for free (without permission) and once for a fee.
I stayed at the homes of 6 personal friends.
I stayed in two private homes listed on the ACA maps.
I stayed in five motels. In Chambers, AZ, there is no other place to sleep. In Erick, TX, it was beastly hot and there were no campgrounds. In Tucumcari, NM, the motel was cheaper than the campground. In Holbrook, AZ, I stayed in a concrete teepee, well, just because you have to experience it. In Needles, CA, I got offered a room for free.
I stayed in one state park (Lake McClellan, TX).
I stayed in one federal park (El Morro National Monument, NM, free).
I stayed in 18 private campgrounds, most of which were RV parks with dedicated spaces for tents.
I stayed in a defunct motel (Amboy, CA, free).
I camped once next to Walmart (Cuba, MO, without permission, free).
I camped once in front of a restaurant (Pontiac, IL, with permission, free).





Offline Jason

Re: Practical camping advice for Route 66
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2016, 05:48:24 pm »
Perfect.  Exactly what I wanted to know

Thanks John
singlespeed touring - life generally requires just one speed.
Southern Tier, TransAm, tons of places in between.

Offline ericfoltz

Re: Practical camping advice for Route 66
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2016, 08:07:16 pm »
Holbrook, AZ - Sahara motel is $24.99. KOA $25.00
Navaho, AZ - Truck stop has a picnic area you can camp in.
Gallup, NM - Tons of cheap motels or you can stop at the Red Rocks CG just east of town.
Milan, NM - RV CG will let you camp in grass area for $10.
Sky City, NM - Rest area on South side of Freeway has shaded picnic areas you can pitch a tent in.
Albuquerque, NM - Coronado SP is a few miles North of town.
Santa Fe, NM - There are a bunch of cheap motels on the main drag.

Once you hit the western states NM, AZ, CA, you can pretty much find a place to camp off the side of the road anywhere that's not in a town. When you go through small towns, don't be afraid to just ask at City Hall, Police or Fire Stations.

Offline CraigC571

Re: Highway use along Route 66
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2016, 09:57:20 pm »
My first experience in a "forum". 
I haven't committed to Route 66 yet.  I looked at an Atlas and noticed the route follows Interstates 55, 44 and 40.  How much riding was actually done on the highways and what percentage of your time was in ear shot of the highways? 
I'm looking for an epic journey but what to get away from the highways.  Suggestions are welcome.  Thanx
Craig

Offline John Nelson

Re: Practical camping advice for Route 66
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2016, 12:35:46 am »
I haven't done the math, and that would be possible, so I'll just give you my gut feel based on riding it. This is about "Bicycle Route 66" which differs from the Route 66 described in books for motorists. Motorists have many routes to choose from, because Route 66 had many routes over the years.

Gut feel is that 5% is on the shoulder of the interstate. Another 8% is on an interstate frontage road. Another 10% is within occasional sight but not earshot of the interstate (e.g., a mile away). All the rest is far enough from the interstate that it does not affect you (other than keeping all the cars away). Sometimes you're as much as 30 miles from the interstate.

Most of the interstate riding is in Arizona.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2016, 12:37:23 am by John Nelson »

Offline CraigC571

Re: Practical camping advice for Route 66
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2016, 08:05:20 am »
Thanx John.  That not as bad as I was visualizing.   
Craig