Poll

For long-distance touring, what kind of pedals do you use?

Clips
1 (5.9%)
Clipless (e.g., SPD)
10 (58.8%)
Platform
5 (29.4%)
Other
1 (5.9%)

Total Members Voted: 15

Author Topic: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?  (Read 8064 times)

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Offline DarrenBnYYC

What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« on: January 24, 2017, 10:27:15 am »
I thought it was interesting that in this thread about "how easy is it to get used to SPD pedals" nobody asked the OP why they wanted to switch to clipless pedals. Rather than hijack that thread, I started this poll to see how many people prefer clipless pedals vs. clips vs. platforms for multi-day touring.

I have used SPD clipless pedals for 10 years for daily commuting and tours. But last year I switched to platforms after having some knee and foot problems building up. Personally, I found that for touring, clipless pedals offered negligible advantages. But with a good set of platform pedals, my comfort increased, foot and knee pain went away, and I could wear comfy, lightweight hikers with better foot support (that cost far less than cycling shoes).

Curious to hear if others have a clear preference based on experience at trying different solutions.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2017, 11:00:04 am »
Clipless for me; Speedplay Frog on two bikes, and Crank Bros. on the other.

Why clipless?  Body preservation.  I have to keep my cadence up, especially going uphill, or my knees start telling me about it.  There's not much overlap between the fastest I can pedal on platforms without my foot slipping off the pedals (and I fall on the top tube, ouch! Ouch!  Owww!) and the slowest I can pedal with clipless before my knees don't like me.

Why Frogs?  First, walkability.  No slipping and sliding when I'm off the bike -- for instance, a "nature break," lunch, or just a snack and time off the saddle.  Second, either system I use has enough free float to accommodate the natural foot rotation I have during a pedal stroke, and I don't have to worry about aligning the cleats just right. 

Somebody's going to holler, "Get fitted!" about now.  Well, years ago someone else suggested finding your natural foot angle by laying on your back and pedaling into the air.  I did; my feet naturally rotate about 15 degrees through the pedal stroke.  Frogs have enough free float to accommodate that, with no light spring action to cause cumulative pain over a long day in the saddle.  SPDs don't, or didn't when I tried them, even with the multi-release cleat and the spring set as light as possible.

Offline adventurepdx

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Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2017, 01:24:07 pm »
I use flat pedals! I started touring with flats, then switched to straps (PowerGrips) for a couple years, now back with pedals with zero retention. Both options allow me to use whatever shoes I want. When I toured across North America six years ago, I had only one pair of shoes that were good walking/hiking shoes. So I didn't have to bring another set of shoes for hikes in the Rockies.

Offline Goodaches

Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2017, 09:28:01 pm »
Well, since I clicked an answer in the survey now I feel the need to explain myself. I did click clipless because the question is "what do you use?" and that's what we've been using. However, when it's time for new biking shoes we are going back to old school cages. With cages we can pick shoes from a much larger universe of choices. When traveling we want our shoes to be multipurpose but in the rare cases we find two-screw shoes with the functional versatility we want there ends up being a weird color or styling issue that makes the shoes a no-go for us. I'm also shocked by the weight of many of the mountain bike and recreational bike shoes. I'm really perplexed that the bike shoe companies don't seem to recognize a market need for two screw shoes, that are light, walkable, and styled for adult casual.

Offline canalligators

Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2017, 11:20:58 pm »
Clipless are recommended for recumbents. You don't have to press to keep your feet on, so you get much less numbness.  Anyway, I have wide feet and straps make my feet numb. Glad to be rid of them, almost 20 years ago.

Offline ian123running

Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2017, 09:09:36 am »
Look Keo.  They make you walk like a duck.  I take Crocs to change into.  We went on a group tour recently and the bikes had flat platform pedals only.  I really missed my Looks.

Offline RonK

What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2017, 06:19:08 pm »
I've been riding clipless for more than 20 years. They feel almost as natural as walking barefoot.

For touring I use SPD. Since I only take one pair of shoes they must be presentable in all situations, looking as much like a normal shoes as possible, with no garish colours, lace closures and walkable soles.

I've found Northwave shoes usually have a model that meets my criteria. Currently I'm wearing Northwave Mission which even have Vibram soles which are great for short hikes.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2017, 06:24:01 pm by RonK »
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Offline walks.in2.trees

Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2017, 05:45:24 pm »
I've been riding clipless for more than 20 years. They feel almost as natural as walking barefoot.

For touring I use SPD. Since I only take one pair of shoes they must be presentable in all situations, looking as much like a normal shoes as possible, with no garish colours, lace closures and walkable soles.

I've found Northwave shoes usually have a model that meets my criteria. Currently I'm wearing Northwave Mission which even have Vibram soles which are great for short hikes.
Anybody else use these shoes? GRAN CANION 2S GTX look promising, but I see reviews where people complain about the fit

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Offline bikemig

Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2017, 07:13:52 pm »
I've used all three systems and like them all. Lately I've been using double sided pedals (clipless/platform). I'm not sure this has a "right" answer but there is trial and error in figuring out what works for you.

Offline vlicon

Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2017, 11:40:19 pm »
I like the combination clipless/platform pedal. My touring bike is also my commuting bike and for a short ride where I don't want to hassle with changing shoes, the platforms are preferred. For a longer ride, especially if it involves climbing hills I want the stiffer mtn bike shoes with cleats and clipless peddles.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2017, 04:44:41 pm by vlicon »

Offline RonK

What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2017, 02:41:24 am »
Anybody else use these shoes? GRAN CANION 2S GTX look promising, but I see reviews where people complain about the fit.
I have considered the Gran Canion GTX, but in reality they are winter boots and I don't tour in winter, so they would be overkill.

As far as fit goes I find Northwaves have a greater internal volume and fit my wide feet nicely one size larger than my normal fit.

With Shimano I have to go two sizes larger to get enough width but then end up with too long shoes that feel like floppy toed clown shoes.

In the current Northwave range both the Spider 2 and the Escape Evo look to match my criteria
« Last Edit: January 27, 2017, 02:51:12 am by RonK »
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Offline johnsondasw

Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2017, 11:35:56 am »
Crank Bros eggbeater style.  Love 'em for day riding or touring.  they never get gummed up in dirty conditions.
May the wind be at your back!

Biketouringhobo

  • Guest
Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2017, 12:13:25 pm »
HI

I am using Sun Ringle ZUZU DH/BMX Platform Pedal for Bike Touring with Waterproof Hiking Boots

Offline walks.in2.trees

Re: What pedals do you use for touring: clips, clipless, platform?
« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2017, 02:24:02 pm »
Anybody else use these shoes? GRAN CANION 2S GTX look promising, but I see reviews where people complain about the fit.
I have considered the Gran Canion GTX, but in reality they are winter boots and I don't tour in winter, so they would be overkill.

As far as fit goes I find Northwaves have a greater internal volume and fit my wide feet nicely one size larger than my normal fit.

With Shimano I have to go two sizes larger to get enough width but then end up with too long shoes that feel like floppy toed clown shoes.

In the current Northwave range both the Spider 2 and the Escape Evo look to match my criteria
They aren't insulated at all, so no, not really a winter boot, unless with wool socks (or unless you live in Florida). on the other hand, the winter shoes they have that ARE insulated, aren't at all like a hiker either. I'm thinking for commuting to work, a waterproof mid-hiker with cleats. I wore my winter Shimano's through the entire year because they are so comfortable, and keep my feet dry in all but driving rain, but the neoprene tops are worn right out. Pretty expensive shoes to have them only last a year...I have a pair of Pearl Izumis and they were cooler in the summer, but my socks would get soaked even in light rain, and I can't be stuck for six hours with wet socks on...I bring dry socks, but that's no help when the shoes are soaked-out too

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