Author Topic: Idworx Easy Rohler  (Read 5957 times)

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Offline dmeans2anend

Idworx Easy Rohler
« on: March 15, 2017, 04:07:33 pm »
Hi.  I'm a complete newbie to cycle touring and want to get into it at some point and do an extended southeast asia tour on a bike.  I'm an avid road cyclist and lightweight backpacker already so I'm guessing cycle touring wouldn't be too difficult to learn.

I have the change to buy an used Idworx Easy Rohler (from Germany) in my size with Rohloff hubs.  I've read some general info. about the bike and about Rohloff hubs but would love to hear pro's and con's from someone that has direct experience with this bike.

Offline canalligators

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2017, 08:22:22 am »
I think I'd recommend that you get out and do some touring first, so you'll get a better idea of what you want in a bike.  You can do tours on a wide variety of bikes, at least to get started.  You'll also find out if the touring bug bites you or not.

That said, I offer no advice on that bike.  But make sure that the bike you get:
- Is comfortable riding it all day  (this is the most important aspect)
- Has a lowest gear around 25 inch-gear
- Is stable with a load at 3 mi/hr climbing, and doesn't go into oscillation at 40 mi/hr on the descents
- Has capacity for the load you intend to carry
- Has sturdy wheels

By the way, are you dismissing recumbents and crank forwards out of hand?  They can be great touring bikes, assuming you use one that meets the criteria above.  (Not all do.)

Offline dmeans2anend

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2017, 12:22:32 pm »
Thanks so much for your comments.

My dilemma is that it's a bit difficult to do 'some touring' without the proper bike to carry the load.    :D

With that said, I am already an avid cyclist and know the importance of good bike fit.  My longest ride has been 150 miles in a day but that was on my high performance light weight carbon fiber Specialized Ruby Pro with Dura ace components that rides like a dream.  My normal training rides are 30 to 40 miles in 2 to 3 hours or so which I ride for performance.  I'm aware cycle touring will be completely different and a whole lot slower with the heavy load.  I don't mind since it'll get me to slow down and enjoy the roses.

I'm fairly confident that I would love cycle touring already based on my love of cycling and backpacking/camping.  My goal is to get rigged for an extended bike tour over seas like for Japan or South East Asia and be able to bike tour for a month or so.  Hence, I really want to get a really nice touring bike for that purpose.

Currently, I'm torn between going with a Titanium bike with Shimano or SRAM components (titanium for the lighter weight and strength) vs. the Aluminum Idworx with Hudloff hubs.  I know I can't afford both ti frame and hudloff hubs.

I am dismissing recumbent for safety issues on the road.

Offline RonK

Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2017, 05:07:37 am »
Several years ago I researched this kind of bike in detail, and eventually bought one.

The Easy Rohler impressed greatly. High quality is obvious and innovative features such as a steering stop, clamping bottom bracket, and integrated Magura hydraulic brakes mark it a special machine.

As I recall, whilst based in Germany, idmworx is located near the border with the Netherlands and is operated by a branch of the family who run the Koga Miyata bike company.

Sadly I was not able to find a supplier willing to ship to my country. Ultimately I bought a Van Nicholas Pioneer Rohloff.

I found Rohloff a disappointment, and did not keep the Pioneer, but sold it on and returned to my preferred bike - a titanium Sabbath Silk Route with derailleur transmission.

My advice - do not buy a titanium bike with Rohloff. The resonant titanium tubes amplify the noisy Rohloff significantly.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 05:20:12 am by RonK »
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2017, 08:42:47 pm »

That said, I offer no advice on that bike.  But make sure that the bike you get:
- Has a lowest gear around 25 inch-gear

FWIW, I prefer to get down to about 20 gear inches.  I've hit plenty of hills I couldn't climb with a 25" gear, but I've never seen a hill I couldn't coast down with 75".

Offline dmeans2anend

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2017, 09:45:33 pm »
Hi RonK,

Thanks for your feedback.  I'd be really interested to learn why you were disappointed with Rohloff.  I've read great things about it but my main concern is the added weight, the noise at gear 7 to 1, and that you have to back off between gear 7 & 8, and 8 & 7.  (reference from Shelton Brown's website).   

Hi Pat,

Thanks for the comment on gearing.  I don't know what is the lowest gear inches that you can get with touring bikes but I'm definitely getting the lowest possible.  I'm fairly small and light weight female and will need all the assist that I can get on mountain climbs.

Offline RonK

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2017, 01:15:19 am »
Hi RonK,

Thanks for your feedback.  I'd be really interested to learn why you were disappointed with Rohloff.  I've read great things about it but my main concern is the added weight, the noise at gear 7 to 1, and that you have to back off between gear 7 & 8, and 8 & 7.  (reference from Shelton Brown's website).
These and various other issues.

It seemed quite appealing to read the marketing about the evenly spaced gears, but I didn't find them particularly useful, since when you need low gears you usually need them fast. I now realise that the usual derailleur gear arrangement with close ratios in the high gears and wider ratios in the lower gears is actually a sensible arrangement for touring bikes. Shifting can be difficult if under even the slightest load. The 8-7 shift is problematic - if you mistime it you can easily find yourself in 14th and grinding to a halt.

None of these things are deal breakers, but ultimately I felt Rohloff was overpriced and overrated, and I resented being told how wonderful a product is and paying a premium price for it only to discover it is not the germanic perfection it is painted to be.

But mostly, the noise drove me crazy.

But these are my personal critcisms. They may not bother you, and you may well like it. The low maintenance aspect will probably appeal to you (assuming you are not an expert bike mechanic).

If the Easy Rohler is in good condition and you can tolerate Rohloff's foibles I'd have no hesitation in buying it.
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Offline canalligators

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2017, 12:30:43 pm »
... I am dismissing recumbent for safety issues on the road.

Which safety issue is that, the "can't be seen" myth?  A typical short- or long-wheelbase bent, such as a Tour Easy or a Giro 26 is almost as high as a shorter person on a DF.  I'll buy it for some trikes and low racers, I wouldn't ride one of those in a city.

Offline zzzz

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2017, 06:06:25 pm »
If I'm reading your self description right, up till now you've ridden a bike in as speedy a manner as you are capable of and you also say your backpacking experience has been of the lightweight variety.

I've never ridden the bike you've asked about but it really looks like a mount thats good for carrying big loads at a very modest pace and I don't believe thats the type of touring thats likely to suit you best.

If you're anything like me (and from your description I'm guessing you are), I'd get a fairly zippy steel or Ti road bike w rear rack mounts, quality wheels that have 32 spokes in a 3 cross pattern, clearance for 32mm tires, (although 28's will work for most trips), and pack pretty light (20 lbs of gear max). What I'm describing is my set-up and with in a couple of days on the road I hardly notice the extra weight of the gear and it feels like I'm just out on a ride. I'm maybe 2 mph slower than with a unladen bike.

There are lots of people who tour on bikes like the Idoworx, and they pack 40±lbs and they enjoy taking their time and they load them up with all kinds of things that make life on the road more comfortable and there is nothing wrong with that. Different strokes. But coming from your background I think it's going to feel like a brick. And since you're used to lightweight backpacking, you're used to doing w/o anything but the necessities when you're on the road.

Just my 2 cents.

I have no opinion on the Rohloff.

Pete

Offline dmeans2anend

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2017, 12:06:32 am »
Hi Ron,

Thanks so much on your feedback with the Rohloff hub.  It's great to hear your perspective and all the pro's and con's.  I'm not sure if I can deal with the noise either.  Having been spoiled by Dura Ace components and how quiet and smooth it is, I always think something is wrong or my gearing is off if I hear any noise.  I'll have to really ponder if I can tolerate it.  Luckily, I won't have to pay the premium price for Rohkoff hub since the bike is used (only 500 miles or so) and comes with the hub.  The main reason I'm seriously considering this bike is for the low maintenance aspect especially if I'm overseas and the language is a barrier.


Hi Pete,

Thanks so much for your comments.  My gut instincts totally agrees with you.  I've seriously consider going exactly the route you've described.  Since I'm only 107 pounds,  every extra pound on the bike will make quiet a bit of difference between whether I'm loving' it or it being a slow slugfest. 

I would love to do the conversation of road bike to fatter tires. However, I don't know all that many "road" bikes that can accommodate the 32mm tires.  Can you suggest some steel or ti "road" bike frames that can do this. Or were your referring to touring bike frames like the Surly LHT, Lynskey backroad ?

Also, wouldn't I need longer chainstays to accommodate rear rack mounts which would bump me to the touring bike frame geometry?  I just don't know any road bikes that come with rear mounts.

Sorry, if some of these questions sounds stupid but it's due to my ignorance of different bike frames.  I was under the assumption that I needed a touring bike frame in order to have rear mounts, can accommodate the larger 32mm tires, and be able to carry the load.

Offline zzzz

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2017, 04:03:36 pm »
Those are really good questions, they zero in on exactly what the issues are on what I suggested.

Here are some options for bikes that may fit the bill for you (I don't know your budget).

- Co-Motion makes several bikes that would work. Their frames are chrome-moly. They make a variety of models but here's one example:

http://co-motion.com/bikes/deschutes

You already know about Lynskey and in a similar vein there's Habernaro :

https://lynskeyperformance.com/road/touring-commuting/viale/

https://www.habcycles.com/cross.html

And if you're prepared to really go upmarket you could go with a Moots:

http://moots.com/bike/routt/

Although w what a Moots costs you can go to one of the better custom frame builders around.

One trouble w loading up a road bike with all the weight on the rear rack is that it can get squirely on the big downhills. I got a pair of the "everything" bags for the forks and a small frame bag and put any small and relatively heavy item in them to spread out the load and I haven't had an issue at any time since I did this.

http://cleavelandmountaineering.blogspot.com/p/everything-bags.html

This Tubus rack will give you some extra heel clearance but I use the Tubus Fly w the smallest size Arkels panniers and thats enough storage for me and my heel doesn't hit.

http://thetouringstore.com/thetouringstore/tubus-bicycle-racks-for-touring-and-commuting/tubus-logo-evo-rear-bicycle-rack/

And last, if I haven't given you enough to read already.... This link is to an excellent article on ultra-light touring that I have referenced repeatedly.

https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?doc_id=9738

The fact that you only weigh 107 lbs is all the more reason to go light.

pm

Offline RonK

Re: Idworx Easy Rohler
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2017, 05:06:34 am »
Since I'm only 107 pounds,  every extra pound on the bike will make quiet a bit of difference between whether I'm loving' it or it being a slow slugfest. 

I would love to do the conversation of road bike to fatter tires. However, I don't know all that many "road" bikes that can accommodate the 32mm tires.  Can you suggest some steel or ti "road" bike frames that can do this. Or were your referring to touring bike frames like the Surly LHT, Lynskey backroad ?

Also, wouldn't I need longer chainstays to accommodate rear rack mounts which would bump me to the touring bike frame geometry?  I just don't know any road bikes that come with rear mounts.

Sorry, if some of these questions sounds stupid but it's due to my ignorance of different bike frames.  I was under the assumption that I needed a touring bike frame in order to have rear mounts, can accommodate the larger 32mm tires, and be able to carry the load.
Well, the kind of bike you are describing is one of the fastest growing segments of the market. They are called by various names - adventure bikes, gravel bikes or gravel grinders. All can take wider tires, most are a little lower geared than a road bike, and most have rack mounts,  Or you can do away with racks and panniers altogether and use bikepacking bags if you are disciplined enough to travel ultralight.

Here is a list of 197 bikes in this category. Sort by the frame material column descending to get the titanium and steel to the top, or the other way to see that there are some very nice carbon bikes too

For my money I think the Genesis Croix De Fer Ti is very tasty.

« Last Edit: March 22, 2017, 05:09:28 am by RonK »
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...