Author Topic: Bike Safety  (Read 3324 times)

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Offline Soulboy#1

Bike Safety
« on: March 30, 2017, 05:40:13 pm »
Hi All.

Another question pre my transam journey. Im thinking about the best set up for bike safety. Im sure this must have been a topic before. Any
suggestions relating to a lock that will maybe slow or stop a potential thief would be appreciated.

Offline John Nelson

Re: Bike Safety
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2017, 06:06:07 pm »
In previous discussions on this subject, the advice has ranged from the two extremes to everywhere in between. Some lock infrequently and minimally. Some lock every time and aggressively. Some never take their eyes off their bikes. There's no right answer, and there's no substitute for accurately reading the risks of the particular situation you find yourself in at this exact moment. Accurate reading of risks is a fine skill developed with lots of experience.

Offline Soulboy#1

Re: Bike Safety
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2017, 07:17:54 pm »
In previous discussions on this subject, the advice has ranged from the two extremes to everywhere in between. Some lock infrequently and minimally. Some lock every time and aggressively. Some never take their eyes off their bikes. There's no right answer, and there's no substitute for accurately reading the risks of the particular situation you find yourself in at this exact moment. Accurate reading of risks is a fine skill developed with lots of experience.

Thank you John...

Offline staehpj1

Re: Bike Safety
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2017, 07:59:13 am »
Almost everyone I have met on tour uses a light cable lock combined with a lot of care about where they leave their bikes unattended.  A few go with no lock, and ever fewer carry a big heavy lock like you would use in a major city.

I have gone with a very light cable lock on most tours, but have also gone with no lock at all.  In places I perceive as high risk I don't let the bike out of my sight.  I seldom stay in cities or even large towns preferring to avoid larger cities in favor of rural small towns.  In rare cases where I have stayed in cities I usually just got a room.  I have wheeled my bike up and down the aisles at walmarts or grocery stores a few times where I thought the risk especially high.  I have also taken it inside and parked it in the front of the store a couple times.  In small town general stores or diners it is often leaned against the front of the building often not locked.

Many of the towns I stop in have populations with two digits and folks don't lock their houses or cars.  I never bother to lock in places like that.  I start to consider it a "big city" when the population has a comma in it :)  At that point I may get more serious about locking or watching the bike.

It helps to ride a bike and use gear that you can easily afford to replace.  That reduces the worry greatly.  The very worst case I'd be delayed a few days assembling new gear or having it shipped from home on a long tour or maybe ending a short tour.  With some minimal attention I think it highly likely I will never have to do either due to a bike theft.

It also helps that I am carrying mostly dirty clothes and used camping gear, on a relatively inexpensive bike, and a minimal amount of those.

Bike friendly cities are the worst since there is usually an established cottage industry of bike theft.  Use great care there.

indyfabz

  • Guest
Re: Bike Safety
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2017, 10:49:55 am »
I have gone with a very light cable lock on most tours, but have also gone with no lock at all.  In places I perceive as high risk I don't let the bike out of my sight.  I seldom stay in cities or even large towns preferring to avoid larger cities in favor of rural small towns.  In rare cases where I have stayed in cities I usually just got a room.  I have wheeled my bike up and down the aisles at walmarts or grocery stores a few times where I thought the risk especially high.  I have also taken it inside and parked it in the front of the store a couple times.  In small town general stores or diners it is often leaned against the front of the building often not locked.

Many of the towns I stop in have populations with two digits and folks don't lock their houses or cars.  I never bother to lock in places like that.  I start to consider it a "big city" when the population has a comma in it :)  At that point I may get more serious about locking or watching the bike.
This is pretty much me.

Offline RussSeaton

Re: Bike Safety
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2017, 02:26:50 pm »
On my longer tours, 3 months, two weeks, few days, I never carried a lock.  Vast majority of that riding was in smaller rural towns and countryside.  A few medium towns too.  At night I always put the bike inside the room or building where I stayed.  When going into stores I just lean the bike in front of the store.  Make it obvious the bike is there.  Don't hide the bike and gear on the side in an alley or behind.  Make it visible right where everyone walks and sees.  I do the same thing riding around my hometown.  I park the bike on the sidewalk below the window in front of the convenience store.  Not hidden and secluded.

Offline Nyimbo

Re: Bike Safety
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2017, 03:13:02 pm »
Much the same for me.  Small lock just keeps someone from using my bike for the quick get-a-way vehicle and a loaded touring bike is heavy to pick up and carry off when it is in view.  But if the store is big enough to keep the bike out of my sight I take it inside.  I don't ask permission. I think that would leave room for people to say no.  Only once did I have someone follow me into the Walmart and tell me "sorry bikes aren,t allowed in the store."  I just asked the greeter what I should do because (exaggerating) I said everything I own is on.the bike and if someone rides off I'm in big trouble.  He said,"ok leave it here next to me and I'll watch it for you." After shopping I visited for a minute told him where I was headed and gave him a big thanks.