Author Topic: Touring on carbon  (Read 41740 times)

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Offline JDFlood

Re: Touring on carbon
« Reply #30 on: July 21, 2014, 03:28:22 pm »
I don't see a reason not to open an old thread.

In the early days of Carbon bikes, there was a ver real problem with terminations and joints. They would shake apart over time. So, they were really expensive and fairly fragile. Therefore, the market had to be large an price insensitive... hence racing. I am sure the technology has matured a lot. So, perhaps a carbon full touring bike will be in the cards. I still havn't seen a full fledged one. But this thread has gotten me thinking, perhaps it is a reason to get another touring bike. That would make 9  bikes... I'm not sure my partner would go for it. I told her I really had quit at 8.

Offline froze

Re: Touring on carbon
« Reply #31 on: July 21, 2014, 08:46:06 pm »
Why quit at 8? no reason to do that! 

Shake apart?  The only bike I heard of that "shook" apart was the original CF bike the Exxon Graftek which really did not shake apart the bonding glue they used didn't worked like they hoped to. Trek had some issues with their Y Foil 66 and 77 series of road bikes but that was again the bonding of the aluminum BB shell into the carbon fiber shell would not hold up.  It seems like the glue or bonding process was the culprit of the earlier CF bikes which in some cases, especially the cheap generic Chinese CF bike can still have issues with the BB shell coming unbonded from the CF frame.  Other then those issues the carbon frame bikes of earlier years broke tubes because the bonded joint was stronger than the frame itself.

Offline cpadesky

Re: Touring on carbon
« Reply #32 on: May 21, 2017, 12:23:12 pm »
Thanks for your responses--you both are knowledgeable.  If anyone out there has taken a carbon bike hauling a trailer on a tour, I'd like to hear about it. I notice carbon bikes are never mentioned on the reviews of touring bikes. 

May the wind be at your back!

I took a carbon fiber road bike on a tour about 15 years ago (Giant TCR) and the frame and fork did great! The gearing and wheels on the other hand... It took a few visits to various bike shops, but I made it coast to coast! I'm looking at the new Diamondback Haanjo exp. It looks perfect!

Offline froze

Re: Touring on carbon
« Reply #33 on: May 21, 2017, 03:44:01 pm »
The Diamondback Haanjo has been highly reviewed and people have been overjoyed by it and it's cost.

Another good bike in that price range is the Giant Contend which has been reviewed as such a good frame that testors thought they were riding on a road bike that cost 6 to 7 times more.  If you want a flat bar bike another great bike is the Specialized Roll City, a great commuter bike.  Both of those bikes cost under $1,000.

Offline johnsondasw

Re: Touring on carbon
« Reply #34 on: July 13, 2017, 02:06:58 pm »
Just completed a relaxed five day "geriatric" (two 57 year olds and a 68 year old) self supported tour around the North Cascades in Wa on a carbon fiber Specialized Roubaix hauling a Burley Nomad trailer.  My two companions used panniers. 
I got the alternate hitch from Burley so as not to load the frame or put any undue pressure on it. This hitch replaces the axle so the load is on the new axle and just pulls to the rear--no weight on the bike itself.  It worked great, and allowed me to use a very lightweight bike and save the pannier weight.  My setup was actually lighter than the others.  However, for a long tour, I think I'd want a sturdy touring bike with frame and components designed to take much more of a beating. I will continue with my setup for relaxed touring. though.  We averaged only 43 mpd and had lots of time to just enjoy.  A lot different from 30 years ago where we averaged 70-90 mpd. Our route, which was a fantastic good time, was Arlington-Darrington-Rockport-Marblemount-Newhalem-Colonial Ck Campground-almost Rainy Pass (although one of us made it there), and then back in reverse to Arlington.  We had lots of quiet country roads with little traffic, perfect weather, and spectacular scenery.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline RussSeaton

Re: Touring on carbon
« Reply #35 on: July 13, 2017, 04:35:21 pm »
Another good bike in that price range is the Giant Contend which has been reviewed as such a good frame that testors thought they were riding on a road bike that cost 6 to 7 times more.

The Giant Contend 1 bike costs $810 according to Google search.  6 to 7 times more is about $4800 to $5600.  Anyone who claims they cannot tell the difference between an $800 bike and a $5000 bike is blowing smoke up your keester.