Author Topic: TransAmerica - Types of roads  (Read 2814 times)

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Offline SaemiVald

TransAmerica - Types of roads
« on: July 20, 2017, 08:31:51 am »
Hi,
Does anyone here have real or "guestimate" numbers on the distances on different types of roads on the TransAmerica trail? For example how many miles on roads with heavy traffic vs light vs no traffic, urban vs rural, roads vs bike-paths, etc.
My wife and I are planning our TransAmerica 2018 tour so I was just wondering.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: TransAmerica - Types of roads
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2017, 09:48:23 am »
Just guessing, of course:
5 miles on a good bike path (the stretch from Lolo to Missoula may add to that)
5 miles on "this is a bike path?"
20 miles on sidewalks
10 miles of interstate (nice riding, if you ignore the broomstick across the shoulder)
maybe 50 miles urban-ish streets
5-10% of the rest is highways with fairly heavy traffic
10% small towns
50% is rural highways, mostly light local traffic
30% rural roads that don't rise to the level of highways

Offline CMajernik

Re: TransAmerica - Types of roads
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2017, 01:57:34 pm »
We have a volunteer who is working on calculating the different road types on all our routes. For the TransAm this is what he has:
State Road miles: 2,134
Federal Road miles: 1,075
Local Road miles: 1,229

If a road shares both state and federal designations it is in the federal category. At this point, any interstate mileage is in the federal category, and any separate paths are in the local Road miles. He is working on separating out the interstate and bike path miles.

FYI - in Montana from Missoula to Hamilton it's now 50 miles on a separate bike path!
« Last Edit: July 20, 2017, 03:40:07 pm by CMajernik »
Carla Majernik
Routes and Mapping Program Director

Adventure Cycling Association
Inspiring people of all ages to travel by bicycle.
800/755-2453, 406/721-1776 x218, 406/721-8754 fax
www.adventurecycling.org

Follow Routes & Mapping on Twitter: @acaroutes

indyfabz

  • Guest
Re: TransAmerica - Types of roads
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2017, 04:12:11 pm »
Traffic volume on some roads can vary with time of year, time of day and/or day of the week.

The path Carla refers to it quite nice. I have ridden it several times, including last year. Sure beats the highway, especially during rush hour. In 2014 I came upon the aftermath of a head on collision on the highway.

And keep a look out for new bike paths that may have been added. I was on portions of the Northern Tier route last month. I was pleasantly surprised to find a path along MT 37 approaching Eureka where the shoulder on the highway ends. Also, there is a path along U.S. 2 (you get on Old U.S. 2 for a while) taking you into W. Glacier that I don't remember from when I was there back in 2009.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: TransAmerica - Types of roads
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2017, 11:37:31 am »
Is all of the Missoula-Hamilton bike path like it was in 2009, when there was a stop sign for bike traffic at Every. Single. Side. Street. And. Driveway?

Drove me nuts.  I was happy to reach the end of it.  TBH, I didn't ride into Missoula during rush hour; I waited until the post office in Lolo could confirm they hadn't received my package, and left about 9:30 Monday morning.  No problems for us over that stretch.

Offline jsieber

Re: TransAmerica - Types of roads
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2017, 11:52:39 am »
Is all of the Missoula-Hamilton bike path like it was in 2009, when there was a stop sign for bike traffic at Every. Single. Side. Street. And. Driveway?

I can think of a very few stop signs for bike traffic between Missoula and Hamilton on the path. Cyclist should be very aware of vehicles turning onto side streets from the highway as they don't always notice cyclists on the path.

indyfabz

  • Guest
Re: TransAmerica - Types of roads
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2017, 02:11:43 pm »
I can think of a very few stop signs for bike traffic between Missoula and Hamilton on the path. Cyclist should be very aware of vehicles turning onto side streets from the highway as they don't always notice cyclists on the path.

Ridden it three times since 2011 and and agree about there being few signs. And while I always looked for turning cars, I encountered very few except in Hamilton itself.