Author Topic: hepatitis A outbreak On the Pacific Coast Route and Southern Tier Route in Calif  (Read 4561 times)

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Biketouringhobo

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hepatitis A outbreak On the Pacific Coast Bicycle Route and Southern Tier Bicycle Route in California

Many travelers said there were no signs at the airport or warnings of the outbreak on travel booking websites. And Closer Look: San Diego’s Hepatitis A Outbreak and Tourism Concerns

By Cassia Pollock and Elena Gomez
http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/Closer-Look-San-Diegos-Hepatitis-A-Outbreak-and-Tourism-444545423.html

San Diego Health Dept..
http://www.sandiegocounty.gov/content/sdc/hhsa/programs/phs/community_epidemiology/dc/Hepatitis_A.html

Offline sam21fire

Yeah, this is related to the explosion of the homeless population in the San Diego area combined with a lack of sanitation.  I imagine that this could become a wider problem if the cities/counties don't get ahead of it.  SD has started installing portapotties and portable hand washing stations as well as checking/vaccinating the homeless folks. They've also started more frequent washing/sanitizing of the sidewalks where they 'go'.

As for touring through the area, common sense prevails just as in any area.  Make sure your food source is safe and reliable, eat hot food hot and cold food cold, and wash your hands frequently (especially around meal prep/eating times).

Sam

Biketouringhobo

  • Guest
Yeah, this is related to the explosion of the homeless population in the San Diego area combined with a lack of sanitation.  I imagine that this could become a wider problem if the cities/counties don't get ahead of it.  SD has started installing portapotties and portable hand washing stations as well as checking/vaccinating the homeless folks. They've also started more frequent washing/sanitizing of the sidewalks where they 'go'.

As for touring through the area, common sense prevails just as in any area.  Make sure your food source is safe and reliable, eat hot food hot and cold food cold, and wash your hands frequently (especially around meal prep/eating times).

Yes it started with the Homeless in Downtown San Diego, CA and in Mission Valley in the San Diego River Bed and it is getting people in Homes/Apts sick in San Diego, CA in San Diego County in Southern California with 444 cases of hep A type 1B and 300 hospitalized and 16 died from Hep A 1B and In North America Hep A is 1A

Sam

Offline Westinghouse

There is a book "The Secret Life of Germs" by a famous epidemiologist. He gives many good tips on how and where pathogens gather and multiply. The book is loaded with advice on what to do and what not to do to avoid contracting diseases. For one bit of advice, wash hands thoroughly after using the restroom. When you leave the restroom, grasp the door handle with a paper towel. Do not touch it with your bare hands. Many people do not wash their hands after using the toilet. And what is the last thing they touch when leaving the restroom?


Offline Westinghouse

According to this epidemiologist, and he reiterates this many times throughout the the entire book, approximately fifty per cent of communicable diseases can  be completely avoided by frequent hand washing.

Offline Molly88

Anyone know if it's now safe to visit California?

Offline Pat Lamb

Probably safer if you stay away from homeless camps.

Did you need somebody to tell you that?  ;)

Offline Molly88

Wondering about stealth camping around Oceanside....

Offline JohnMiller65

Wondering about stealth camping around Oceanside....
from what I hear from Homelessness News San Diego it was in mostly in City of San Diego CA and El Cajon, CA  and it was mostly in 75% non-Homeless people who got the Hepatitis A Virus in San Diego, CA and San Diego CA and El Cajon, CA was ground zero for Hepatitis A Virus outbreak

I have been watching and keep my eyes out from Prescott, Arizona

Hepatitis A
A homeless person gets the Hep A vaccine from a County public health nurse San Diego Hepatitis A Outbreak ended
On January 23, 2018, the County ended the local health emergency, declared on September 1, 2017, in response to the local hepatitis A outbreak. The action does not mean the outbreak is over, and the County will continue efforts it has taken to control the spread of the disease.

Anyone who received their first hepatitis vaccination before mid-September, 2017, should get a second dose now to complete the series and assure long-term protection. Although the first dose of the vaccine is considered to be around 95 percent effective,

https://www.sandiegocounty.gov/content/sdc/hhsa/programs/phs/community_epidemiology/dc/Hepatitis_A.html