Author Topic: Lightweight stoves  (Read 3141 times)

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Offline dkoloko

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2018, 10:43:41 am »
As far as half a gallon is a lot to carry, if don't want to carry two quarts, carry one, and sell or give away the rest of a gallon.

As to using regular unleaded gas, if works for you tell us. No smoke? No clogging? A number of alternatives to Coleman fuel can be used with multi-fuel stoves, but are not recommended for extensive use.

As to simmering with Whisperlite, I've used the upgrade model, simmers fine.

As to getting by TSA; done it. Stove and bottle should be clean and odor free.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2018, 11:05:30 am »
As to simmering with Whisperlite, I've used the upgrade model, simmers fine.
Good to hear.  That sets my mind at ease.  I only need decent simmering not great simmering.

As to getting by TSA; done it. Stove and bottle should be clean and odor free.
Care to comment on how you cleaned it and how much effort it was? was the cleaning after using gasoline?  Also how many times have you been through TSA with it?  Do you know if they ever actually inspected it?  Did they swab it?

Is cleaning it a bigger deal if you use gasoline or kerosene?

Sorry for so many questions, but I am on the verge of pulling the trigger on a whisperlite and want to have a handle on the issues.

Offline Alan Kimber

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2018, 05:35:36 am »
Thanks for the input folks. I normally use multi-fuel stoves on big mountain climbing trips, such as Denali, where 'white gas' is available. For cycling I'll certainly be using bottled gas. I'll look more closely at places to restock en-route the GDMBR. If I run out, would a carefully laid open fire be allowed?

Offline staehpj1

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2018, 10:09:18 am »
Just a follow up.  I finally did spring for a Whisperlite International and an 11 ounce fuel bottle and am pretty optimistic after testing it a little.  It seems well made, easy to use, and not too heavy.

I already had a couple old fuel bottles from the 70's that were larger (20 oz?), but the 11 ounce bottle seems about right for most of my usage.  About the only time I'd carry the larger bottle would be if I was backpacking or XC skiing and melting snow for water.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2018, 11:44:04 am »
I have had TSA confiscate MSR style fuel bottles.  The bottle was clean and odor free.  They know a fuel bottle when they see one.
Danno

Offline staehpj1

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2018, 12:22:44 pm »
I have had TSA confiscate MSR style fuel bottles.  The bottle was clean and odor free.  They know a fuel bottle when they see one.
Given how expensive bottles and stoves are that is a real problem.  I plan to mail them to the start and then home at the end when I fly.  That or use my pop can alcohol stoves when I fly.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 11:28:18 am by staehpj1 »

Offline RandyOakley

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2018, 03:21:51 pm »
Just a follow up.  I finally did spring for a Whisperlite International and an 11 ounce fuel bottle and am pretty optimistic after testing it a little.  It seems well made, easy to use, and not too heavy.

I already had a couple old fuel bottles from the 70's that were larger (20 oz?), but the 11 ounce bottle seems about right for most of my usage.  About the only time I'd carry the larger bottle would be if I was backpacking or XC skiing and melting snow for water.
I would advise caution while using older Sigg fuel bottles with an MSR stove.  MSR developed their own line of fuel bottles after the Sigg bottles developed cracks from long term use with MSR stoves.  At the very least avoid over pumping
, inspect the bottles carefully and watch out for leaks.

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Offline staehpj1

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2018, 11:57:15 am »
As far as half a gallon is a lot to carry, if don't want to carry two quarts, carry one, and sell or give away the rest of a gallon.
Just another followup...
I also consider a quart to be a lot to carry for an on road bicycle tour.  I figure that my 11 oz (10 oz actual useable capacity) bottle is good for a little over 7 days when backpacking and probably a good bit longer on most bike tours.  On tour I am likely to eat some diner meals and am less likely to have my morning coffee in camp.  I can probably do most of my shorter tours (8 or 9 days) with my 11 oz bottle and no refills.

Since I prefer to restock frequently rather than carry more food and fuel, the 11 oz bottle seems about right for me even on multi month tours.  I plan to use gasoline most of the time when restocking on the road and coleman fuel when I have the option of filling at home.

Offline RandyOakley

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2018, 12:21:23 pm »
As far as half a gallon is a lot to carry, if don't want to carry two quarts, carry one, and sell or give away the rest of a gallon.
Just another followup...
I also consider a quart to be a lot to carry for an on road bicycle tour.  I figure that my 11 oz (10 oz actual useable capacity) bottle is good for a little over 7 days when backpacking and probably a good bit longer on most bike tours.  On tour I am likely to eat some diner meals and am less likely to have my morning coffee in camp.  I can probably do most of my shorter tours (8 or 9 days) with my 11 oz bottle and no refills.

Since I prefer to restock frequently rather than carry more food and fuel, the 11 oz bottle seems about right for me even on multi month tours.  I plan to use gasoline most of the time when restocking on the road and coleman fuel when I have the option of filling at home.
With "multi-fuel" versions of the MSR stoves you can burn stuff like mineral spirits, etc sold in paint stores in 1 quart quantities.

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Offline Alan Kimber

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #24 on: March 13, 2018, 11:25:22 am »
It's me again. I recall finding an article on how some threads on gas cans do not fit some stoves. I have lost the link and hope  some of you can  remind me. Thanks.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #25 on: March 13, 2018, 12:36:28 pm »
It's me again. I recall finding an article on how some threads on gas cans do not fit some stoves. I have lost the link and hope  some of you can  remind me. Thanks.

Some resources:

https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2016/11/can-i-use-any-brand-of-gas-canister.html

https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2012/01/gas-canisters-101.html



Offline ZiZohn

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #26 on: March 17, 2018, 09:59:52 pm »
We 've had 2 or 3 of us do a couple plus weeks of touring on portions of the Southern Tier between San Diego and Phoenix in each of the last 2 years, and carried Kovea Spider Stoves for cooking. The Kovea uses a canister for fuel. I found it tough to find the canisters while touring these areas. But there is an adapter available from Kovea to allow connection to a propane fuel bottle, such as are used on larger Coleman stoves or a propane torch. We were able to easily find these fuel bottles in hardware stores. They worked great. We usually picked up 2 bottles for cooking, as we carried 2 stoves, one for a skillet to brown meat, and one for a pot for cooking pasta and such. Never ran out in the 2+ weeks we rode. I also own a MSR Pocket Rocket and a couple MSR Whisper Light Multi-Fuel stoves. I tried the adapter on the MSR's and they do not work with them. Only on the Kovea.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2018, 08:42:10 am »
We 've had 2 or 3 of us do a couple plus weeks of touring on portions of the Southern Tier between San Diego and Phoenix in each of the last 2 years, and carried Kovea Spider Stoves for cooking. The Kovea uses a canister for fuel. I found it tough to find the canisters while touring these areas. But there is an adapter available from Kovea to allow connection to a propane fuel bottle, such as are used on larger Coleman stoves or a propane torch. We were able to easily find these fuel bottles in hardware stores. They worked great. We usually picked up 2 bottles for cooking, as we carried 2 stoves, one for a skillet to brown meat, and one for a pot for cooking pasta and such. Never ran out in the 2+ weeks we rode. I also own a MSR Pocket Rocket and a couple MSR Whisper Light Multi-Fuel stoves. I tried the adapter on the MSR's and they do not work with them. Only on the Kovea.
I used to carry a propane stove for backpacking and canoe camping way back in the day, before I started bike touring, but in recent years decided the propane cylinders were way too heavy to make much sense for my style of camping.

Your two cylinders together would weigh almost 4 pounds when full if they were the 16 ounce ones and a bit less if the 14 ounce ones.  For those of us who are very weight conscious that is a non-starter.  For those who don't care much about packing light another propane option would be the grasshopper stove.  I still have one from back in the early 70's and it still works fine, I use it when we are without power in our house after storms.

Offline ZiZohn

Re: Lightweight stoves
« Reply #28 on: March 18, 2018, 11:19:38 am »
I agree, the propane cylinders are a tad heavy, even for the smaller ones. But we chose to cook and eat together each day. So we divided all the cooking stuff up, as evenly as  possible, spreading the weight among the 3 of us. I wouldn't even consider them if I was backpacking, as I like ultralight when doing that. But they were the only ones we could find without going lots out of our way to get to an REI or such that carried the small canisters. We also decided we could make do with 1 stove among the three of us on our next trip next year. I easily was able to carry a total of 54 pounds on my Surly during the trip. Food for our group and my water weren't figured into that total, as that varied daily. But like everyone else, we are always looking at ways to cut weight during our trips. If we weren't eating as a group, I definitely would be carrying a lighter cookset. Probably would go with my alcohol stove, as the fuel is easier to find. And the weight is pretty much nil.  But we like throwing together a nice group meal whenever possible in the evenings when camping.