Author Topic: Cycling in New York City  (Read 1060 times)

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Offline hikerjer

Cycling in New York City
« on: April 03, 2018, 11:30:30 pm »
I hope to end a cross-country tour sometime this fall in NYC. My question is how easy or difficult will it be to cycle from the countryside outside the city right into Manhattan. Is there a system of bike trails that will  lead me int the city or will I have to patch together a network of streets and highways to get there?  Tunnels and bridges are not among m favorite rides.

Thanks.

Offline jamawani

Re: Cycling in New York City
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2018, 01:16:40 am »
If you bike out to the New Jersey shore at Atlantic Highlands / Sandy Hook -
You can bike on the Henry Hudson bike trail from Keyport all the way to the Atlantic.
The you can take the Seastreak fast ferry right past the Statue of Liberty to Manhattan.

Offline canalligators

Re: Cycling in New York City
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2018, 10:26:33 pm »
Which direction are you coming in from?  What part of NYC are you trying to get to?

There is no cycling route across Staten Island.  Years ago it was possible but the one bridge that used to allow bikes no longer does.  Pity, you could take the Staten Island Ferry to Manhattan.  For free.

The Sandy Hook ferry from the south is often mentioned. 

If you're coming from the north, you have a couple of options:
1. Come down the west side of the Hudson on Bike 9 from the Nyack NY area into Fort Lee NJ, then cross the George Washington Bridge.  The cycling accommodation is good.  Connect from that to the westside bike trail running along the Hudson.  This route is often used by tourists, in fact I've done that one.  (This doesn't help if you don't care for bridges, especially high ones.)
2. There are ferries from various points in the Jersey City area to Manhattan.  But I don't have any recommendations for how to get to the ferry terminals.  I am not aware of any good routes, and the area is very urban.
3. Cross the Hudson at Bear Mountain then come down the east side of the river.  There are parkways with bike paths, like the Saw Mill River parkway.  This will put you in the north end of Manhattan.