Author Topic: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX  (Read 862 times)

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Offline JohnMiller65

Adventure cycling digital GPX route maps for Pacific coast route

my question is should I just order paper map set or order them both

Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX Maps or both

Pacific coast map set
Vancouver, BC - Imperial Beach, CA (1,857.0 miles)
$73.75

Pacific coast map set digital
Vancouver, BC - Imperial Beach, CA (1,857.0 miles)
$24.95

I just ordered the Garmin Edge Explore 1000 GPS unit for my bicycle touring trips. And I am going to be using my new Garmin Edge Explore 1000 GPS unit for my bicycle touring trip on the Pacific coast route.

« Last Edit: April 14, 2018, 11:33:05 am by JohnMiller65 »

Offline John Nettles

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2018, 11:41:07 am »
I would order the paper maps for sure.  If the data set money is not an issue order that too but beware of the data set's limitations.

I am not impressed with their Data sets.  The names are confusing, i.e. a campground may be listed as "CG-Eureka Holiday Hills RV Resort and Campground" (making that name up).  The problem is a lot of GPS lists limit the name length so you may only get "CG-Eureka Holi" and MAY miss an important word and thus end up going to the wrong location.  The codes they use for the waypoints are also confusing, at least to me.

The worst thing though, for me at least, is that they only list those services listed on the maps even though tons of others may exist.  For instance, you may have 10 hotels on or near the route  as you pass through a city but they only list the two or three that are shown on the paper map.  I can understand not listing every hotel, CG, POI, grocery, etc. on the map due to space limitations but in a data set, that really should not be that big of a deal to add the extra unlisted ones.

If you want turn by turn directions, be sure your GPS can handle tracks (not waypoints/routes) for turn by turn as I think a lot of the new data sets use tracks exclusively.  Therefore, if you prefer routes instead of tracks, you will basically have to re-create the data set before you leave but at least you can easily see the route while you re-create it.

If you like apps, using your phone for routing, etc., the new ACA Route Apps look very good however.  Pluses are you no longer require a GPS if you basically stick close to the route.  The biggest con is that you have a slightly harder time with battery management and should you lose or ruin your phone while on tour, you are out of luck with route guidance.

Enjoy your tour!!  It is a beautiful route!
Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!
John

Offline Inge

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2018, 01:44:54 am »
I am cycling the route this summer ie part of it and have only ordered the tracks - am using Garmin etrex 30x. I do not see on the road the extra value of the maps since they very likely will be identical. What I did however was buying two books : Bicycling the Pacific Coast byVicky Spring & Tom Kirkendall and Cycling the Pacific Coast: the complete guide from Canada to Mexico by Bill Thorness. With the use of the aca tracks and these books I created my own route along the coast. I especially lkike the latter book for it is the most recent and gives good tips of things to see/ do along the route.

On the aca track I marked the campsites, in Basecamp, I want to stay at as well as other campsites in the vicinity of my daily mileage as well as other services that I think for me will come in handy. On top of that I have installed Osmand on my phone (do not have internet) and on my tablet (no internet either unluss free wifi is available)  and put the tracks their as well. This gives me basically the same as looking on a map to find services.

When using your gps I suggest that you use tracks and not routes for they, if you deviate, keep sending you back to where you left the route. I started out when I fist had the gps with routes but quickly changed to tracks. This for me works way better.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2018, 09:44:52 am »
Bicycling the Pacific Coast byVicky Spring & Tom Kirkendall and Cycling the Pacific Coast: the complete guide from Canada to Mexico by Bill Thorness. With the use of the aca tracks and these books I created my own route along the coast. I especially lkike the latter book for it is the most recent and gives good tips of things to see/ do along the route.

On the aca track I marked the campsites, in Basecamp, I want to stay at as well as other campsites in the vicinity of my daily mileage as well as other services that I think for me will come in handy.

Interesting approach, Inge, and I hope it works well for you.  My self-supported experience, though, is that it's senseless to plan further ahead than a day or two.  Headwinds, storms, diversions, hills, or just plain old fatigue, and a planned 60 mile day only sees 35 miles ridden.  That means the next tough 50 mile day would  need to be an almost impossible (given the terrain) 75 miles to catch up.  Maybe the reverse could also happen if you caught an awesome tailwind, I've only heard of those.  ;)

The point is, unless you're going to work really hard to hit a destination each day, the little slips add up.  Unless you've got campsites loaded for the entire route, I'd bet you'll be out of sync within a week.

Offline John Nettles

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2018, 09:47:04 am »
When using your gps I suggest that you use tracks and not routes for they, if you deviate, keep sending you back to where you left the route.

The routes only try to re-route you to where to the next way point if you left the route intentionally (CG off route) or unintentionally, i.e. a forced detour.  I think you are thinking about the issue if you bypass the next way point as THEN it tries to reroute you to the one you first bypassed.  However, if you go to the next available way point (a way point after the bypassed waypoint) on the route, it automatically recalculates.  The reason is that the device is thinking to get you to the next way point (the one you bypassed) but if you pass a subsequent way point, it assumes you no longer need to go back to the one you bypassed originally.

With tracks, if you leave the route, you are totally on your own but you can always see where the route is.  Also, be sure to check the amount of track points the GPS device can hold as some devices must have the tracks reduced in BaseCamp to get them to fit.

Since I do primarily custom routes now (I have ridden most of the ACA routes over my 35 years of loaded touring), I create my own routes and you can hold a lot more distance with routes than detailed tracks.  Garmin has repeated verified this as I always strive to maximize the device.

Routes/tracks is about as personal as panniers/trailers, helmets, disk/non-disk brakes, etc.   :) .  I agree with you in that you should use what works for you.
Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!
John

Offline JohnMiller65

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2018, 03:37:50 pm »
I would order the paper maps for sure.  If the data set money is not an issue order that too but beware of the data set's limitations.

I am not impressed with their Data sets.  The names are confusing, i.e. a campground may be listed as "CG-Eureka Holiday Hills RV Resort and Campground" (making that name up).  The problem is a lot of GPS lists limit the name length so you may only get "CG-Eureka Holi" and MAY miss an important word and thus end up going to the wrong location.  The codes they use for the waypoints are also confusing, at least to me.

The worst thing though, for me at least, is that they only list those services listed on the maps even though tons of others may exist.  For instance, you may have 10 hotels on or near the route  as you pass through a city but they only list the two or three that are shown on the paper map.  I can understand not listing every hotel, CG, POI, grocery, etc. on the map due to space limitations but in a data set, that really should not be that big of a deal to add the extra unlisted ones.

If you want turn by turn directions, be sure your GPS can handle tracks (not waypoints/routes) for turn by turn as I think a lot of the new data sets use tracks exclusively.  Therefore, if you prefer routes instead of tracks, you will basically have to re-create the data set before you leave but at least you can easily see the route while you re-create it.

If you like apps, using your phone for routing, etc., the new ACA Route Apps look very good however.  Pluses are you no longer require a GPS if you basically stick close to the route.  The biggest con is that you have a slightly harder time with battery management and should you lose or ruin your phone while on tour, you are out of luck with route guidance.

Enjoy your tour!!  It is a beautiful route!
Thank you John

it is all new to me but I need to learn more

from John Miller

Offline Inge

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2018, 12:51:03 am »
Pat lamb - I usually set out my distances before I leave home. Have to be in SFO on a set date - however I always plan enough "extra" days in order to make up for deviances. And yes I marked campsites out along the complete route (Vancouver - SFO). My mileage also varies enormously - long days alternated with shorter days, spending an extra day here or there as well as a reasonably easy, lowmileage start - am also getting used to the time difference since I am flying in from the Netherlands.

Since I am on a fixed time period I needed to set the complete route in order to find out if what I wanted was feasible and I wanted to "kinda" ride a similar route as I did 25 years ago (cycled according to Kirkendall's book then)  therefor the use of some extra info on the route. Main reason was that I wanted to follow the coastline as much as possible and the aca in certain parts is quite a bit away from the coast.

Offline Molly88

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2018, 07:34:45 am »
John-  what mount are you using for your Garmin Edge Explore 1000 GPS that you are using for your bicycle touring trips?  Where have you mounted it on your handlebar and what handlebar are you using?  Thanks, Molly

Offline erniegrillo

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2018, 04:05:32 pm »
order or pick up a copy (available at all info centers )  the free Oregon state guide to the bike route.
It is excellent

http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/Programs/TDD%20Documents/oregon-coast-bike-route-map.pdf

Offline adventurepdx

  • World Traveler
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  • Riding bikes in and around Portland, Oregon
Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2018, 04:56:32 pm »
I am cycling the route this summer ie part of it and have only ordered the tracks - am using Garmin etrex 30x. I do not see on the road the extra value of the maps since they very likely will be identical. What I did however was buying two books : Bicycling the Pacific Coast byVicky Spring & Tom Kirkendall and Cycling the Pacific Coast: the complete guide from Canada to Mexico by Bill Thorness. With the use of the aca tracks and these books I created my own route along the coast. I especially like the latter book for it is the most recent and gives good tips of things to see/ do along the route.

The Thorness book is basically the new edition of the Kirkendall/Spring, as Bill has "taken over" the title. I'd definitely lean heavier on the new Thorness book, as it's much more thorough than the Kirkendall/Spring books, and the last edition of the Kirkendall/Spring book came out in either 2005 or 2006.

Offline JohnMiller65

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2018, 05:02:31 pm »
I am cycling the route this summer ie part of it and have only ordered the tracks - am using Garmin etrex 30x. I do not see on the road the extra value of the maps since they very likely will be identical. What I did however was buying two books : Bicycling the Pacific Coast byVicky Spring & Tom Kirkendall and Cycling the Pacific Coast: the complete guide from Canada to Mexico by Bill Thorness. With the use of the aca tracks and these books I created my own route along the coast. I especially like the latter book for it is the most recent and gives good tips of things to see/ do along the route.

The Thorness book is basically the new edition of the Kirkendall/Spring, as Bill has "taken over" the title. I'd definitely lean heavier on the new Thorness book, as it's much more thorough than the Kirkendall/Spring books, and the last edition of the Kirkendall/Spring book came out in either 2005 or 2006.
I have the The Essential Touring Cyclist: A Complete Guide for the Bicycle Traveler, 1st Edition little out dated

Offline JohnMiller65

Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2018, 05:09:00 pm »
I am cycling the route this summer ie part of it and have only ordered the tracks - am using Garmin etrex 30x. I do not see on the road the extra value of the maps since they very likely will be identical. What I did however was buying two books : Bicycling the Pacific Coast byVicky Spring & Tom Kirkendall and Cycling the Pacific Coast: the complete guide from Canada to Mexico by Bill Thorness. With the use of the aca tracks and these books I created my own route along the coast. I especially like the latter book for it is the most recent and gives good tips of things to see/ do along the route.

The Thorness book is basically the new edition of the Kirkendall/Spring, as Bill has "taken over" the title. I'd definitely lean heavier on the new Thorness book, as it's much more thorough than the Kirkendall/Spring books, and the last edition of the Kirkendall/Spring book came out in either 2005 or 2006.
I just found Cycling the Pacific Coast: The Complete Guide from Canada to Mexico book on amazon. and next time that I order on Amazon and I will buy that book

Offline adventurepdx

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Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2018, 05:18:31 pm »
I just found Cycling the Pacific Coast: The Complete Guide from Canada to Mexico book on amazon. and next time that I order on Amazon and I will buy that book

Make sure it's the current Thorness edition. The older ones are fine as a historical artifact, but a bit outdated and not as thorough as the current book.

Offline KKTice

Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2018, 10:26:46 am »
I just found Cycling the Pacific Coast: The Complete Guide from Canada to Mexico book on amazon. and next time that I order on Amazon and I will buy that book

Make sure it's the current Thorness edition. The older ones are fine as a historical artifact, but a bit outdated and not as thorough as the current book.


The First edition of the Thorness book is 2017.  The Spring/Kirkendall book apparently is out of print, as suggested by others. 


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« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 10:31:54 am by KKTice »
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Offline adventurepdx

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Re: Pacific coast route paper maps vs Pacific coast route digital GPX
« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2018, 11:55:21 am »
The First edition of the Thorness book is 2017.  The Spring/Kirkendall book apparently is out of print, as suggested by others. 

Technically, both are part of the same series, published by the Mountaineers. Thorness basically took over the series from Spring/Kirkendall.