Author Topic: What shoes?  (Read 2430 times)

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Offline geotrouvetout67

What shoes?
« on: November 14, 2019, 11:07:00 am »
What clipless (SPD) shoes are you riding on weeks long adventures (like the GDMTR)?
Did they work? Not? Too hot, too cold?

Offline Tandem Tom

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2019, 04:48:05 pm »
My wife and I have been wearing Shimano cycling sandals for a number of tours. I wear them in the winter with 2 pairs of socks. We like the fact that if we ride in the rain they dry out quite fast.

Offline driftlessregion

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2019, 04:53:37 pm »
Lake or Sidi because they both make wide sizes.

Offline staehpj1

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2019, 06:10:10 am »
I love Sidi MTB shoes.  The Mega models fit me well.  I have worn the cheaper models and liked them okay, but am currently using Dominators.  They drain well and dry fast.  I am fine at all temperatures from very hot down to quite cold if I choose socks that dry fast and are okay when damp/wet.

I have never toured with them but if it is brutally cold I have used shoe covers around home for sub zero weather.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2019, 01:27:13 pm »
I like Sidi Dominators.  But it depends on your trip and your load.  I wore out the sole of one pair walking up the steep hills of Virginia and Kentucky on the TransAm.  That was painful to the wallet.

Online Iowagriz

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2019, 02:39:50 pm »
Great Divide will likely involve more walking than a typical road tour.  MTB shoes can also double as reasonable camp shoes (depending on how much time you plan to spend off the bike).  I've ridden parts of the GDMBR in Montana a few times for a week at a time.  In the past, I've used my normal MTB/Racing shoes.  While broken in and comfortable during my daily riding, they were too tight after multiple days of 12-16hrs at a time in them.  I've recently bought a pail of Pearl Izumi X-Alp Canyon. Also went up a full size to ensure I have extra room for my feet to swell.  I have yet to ride multiple days in them, but they are a popular model for the route and so far, they are good.

Enjoy the ride, it is a great trip.

Offline canalligators

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2019, 12:07:17 pm »
I prefer to ride in a walkable shoe for ANY tour, so I don't have to carry extra footwear.

I am also biased towards durable equipment.  My experiences are limited, but it seems that Shimano brand pedals are generally tough and long-lasting.  The seals are excellent and the bearings are the best design for the job (roller bearings) and very good quality.  I have 30K+ miles on one pair, 20K+ on another, still going strong.  Just hit them with spray oil once a year and change your shoes' cleats on occasion.  Contrast: the Eggbeaters that I tried failed in a few thousand miles.  The SPD knockoffs a friend bought, same story.

I'm sure that other manufacturers make durable pedals, but I will stick with the ones I know, unless I learn that their quality has slipped.

Offline ray b

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2019, 12:06:11 pm »
What clipless (SPD) shoes are you riding on weeks long adventures (like the GDMTR)?Did they work? Not? Too hot, too cold?
Wide temperature range - Stiff, cycling sandals with sock options range to include short wool with waterproof oversocks such as Seal Skinz. I've used the extreme set-up in the summer snows on the GDR without problem or discomfort.
In addition, I always have a pair of Keen or equivalent camp sandals with which I could hike several miles, if necessary.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2019, 12:14:48 pm by ray b »
“A good man always knows his limitations.”

Offline geotrouvetout67

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2019, 02:30:57 pm »
I prefer to ride in a walkable shoe for ANY tour, so I don't have to carry extra footwear.

I am also biased towards durable equipment.  My experiences are limited, but it seems that Shimano brand pedals are generally tough and long-lasting.  The seals are excellent and the bearings are the best design for the job (roller bearings) and very good quality.  I have 30K+ miles on one pair, 20K+ on another, still going strong.  Just hit them with spray oil once a year and change your shoes' cleats on occasion.  Contrast: the Eggbeaters that I tried failed in a few thousand miles.  The SPD knockoffs a friend bought, same story.

I'm sure that other manufacturers make durable pedals, but I will stick with the ones I know, unless I learn that their quality has slipped.

I have been using Shimano XT pedals for 30 years, both flats and SPD, now also have the combo with flat and one side SPD, they never failed me, never even opened them up to grease the bearings on any of them.

Offline RonK

What shoes?
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2019, 07:15:09 pm »
I only take one pair of shoes when I tour, so they have to presentable and practical whether I'm catching a flight or train, dining out, taking in the city sights, hiking a side trip, and of course for riding.
So I prefer conventionally looking shoes - with no garish colours, and with lace up fastenings, or at least only laces visible under long pants.
I've been using Northwave all mountain shoes for over 10 years, currently the Escape. They are stiff enough to transfer power to the pedals but not too stiff for walking, and have quite high internal volume which suits my big flat feet. They also have grippy soles for traction off the bike.
Looking at the current lineup I'd opt for the Tribe.

Edit just realised the Tribe is for flat pedals so I'd probably stick with Escape.

https://www.northwave.com/ch-CH-en/Sell_All-Mountain_8F7.aspx
« Last Edit: November 24, 2019, 08:50:19 pm by RonK »
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Offline noisefor

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2020, 03:39:12 pm »
If you can find them, the Pearl Izumi X-Alp Peak (SPD) is a solid choice for mixed use (touring). They are comfortable, light, really well constructed and ideal for longer trips. They are lace-up (which I prefer), have a solid and normal feeling Vibram sole (which is suitable for walking in town or up a ravine). The platform is firm enough for mashing/pulling on uphills, but flexible enough not to feel like Frankenstien when walking. They also look like regular shoes (inconspicuous), they breath well and have removeable liners for airing out. Only downside is they are all synthetic so they tend to be on the cooler side on cold days. PI upgraded to the X-ALP Elevate, which are probably just as well made, but have the no lace velcro flap/dial-in fit which I don't like. I have ridden/used these pretty hard and they show little to no signs of wear. 

« Last Edit: May 24, 2020, 05:39:53 pm by noisefor »

Offline misterflask

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2020, 07:01:11 pm »
I love my Shimano sandals but I don't think I'd take them touring.  I find the grit that gets under the straps in the rain annoying.  I use a pair of garden variety laced Shimano MTB shoes for touring.  I need to get out of them at night, so sometimes I bring flip-flops and sometimes Merrill trail runners.

Partly changing the subject, squeaky cleat noise seems to be a thing with SPD.  I cure it on the road by finding a waxy paper coffee cup, clipping through it, and riding for a few miles.

Offline Inge

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2020, 03:08:27 am »
I recently made a switch from flat pedals into clipless ones (Crankbrothers) - had to use different pedals for my new Vaude (for mixed use) TVL Hjul Ventilation and TVL hjul. The new shoes did not have enough grip on the flatpedals. However I am glad I got them for with the new pedal/ shoe combo I no longer have painful feet after having ridden for about an hour or so. The vaude shoes are pretty darn stiff which is great for cycling but have enough flex to walk reasonably comfortable on. I do however, now, pack a pair of light Meindl sandals to be able to hike some miles if need be.
BTW the Hjul ventilation is for really warm weather and the "regular" Hjul I use for temps till about 20 Celsius - but that is around the home. On a tour with reasonably hot weather I would opt to take the ventilation and wear extra warm socks if need be.

Though I have not ridden the GDMBR - is on my wish list - I read quite some blogs and would be confident that with the Crankbrothers/ Vaude combo the hiking parts on the GDMBR would not be a problem.



Offline misterflask

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2020, 07:00:31 am »
<< bearings are the best design for the job (roller bearings) >>

Which Shimano pedals have roller bearings?  I want what you're riding.

I've rebuilt several pair of Shimano ball bearing pedals and it is not for the faint of heart with 60 or so tiny balls in each bearing and odd special tools required.

I've been using Shimano M324 'campus pedals' on several bikes, which as previously noted have excellent seals and last about forever.

Offline Harmonograph

Re: What shoes?
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2020, 11:23:36 am »
I also recommend the Sidi MTB shoes, they are the best one that I have used so far.