Author Topic: Drinking water  (Read 1715 times)

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Offline pedaler

Drinking water
« on: February 11, 2020, 11:01:06 am »
According to the route maps for the Southern Tier, there is no potable water at Gila Hot Springs.  Can this be consumed after filtration?  I have a SURVIVOR FILTER PRO?

Offline John Nettles

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Re: Drinking water
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2020, 11:08:28 am »
I don't know if the filter will work but there is a general store (Doc's) in the area.  Worst case is to ask someone (several homes around). BTW, that area is very hilly but the Monument is nice.

Tailwinds, John

Offline John Nelson

Re: Drinking water
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2020, 11:57:36 am »
I wouldn't carry a filter all the way across the country just to get drinking water in one place. Just carry some extra water there if necessary.

Online staehpj1

Re: Drinking water
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2020, 06:30:08 am »
I agree with John.  I love my filter and carry it where it is useful.  I didn't carry it on the Southern Tier and wouldn't if doing it again.  There is just so little surface water anywhere that there isn't tap water available.

Offline pedaler

Re: Drinking water
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2020, 12:57:48 pm »
Thanks for the input, I deduce from all of you - not to take one!

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Drinking water
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2020, 08:03:51 am »
As suggested, if there are some days where potable water sources seem scarce, just pack extra in something like a soda bottle. I did that very thing back in June for a 54 mile day with a long climb (over 4,000' of total climbing) on a potentially hot day because there was no potable water source between campgrounds.

Online staehpj1

Re: Drinking water
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2020, 08:43:12 am »
As suggested, if there are some days where potable water sources seem scarce, just pack extra in something like a soda bottle. I did that very thing back in June for a 54 mile day with a long climb (over 4,000' of total climbing) on a potentially hot day because there was no potable water source between campgrounds.
Yes there are some long dry stretches on the ST.  I did indeed pick up some empty sport drink bottles for those sections rather than carry enough water bottles or bladders for the whole trip.

Offline bobbys beard

Re: Drinking water
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2020, 03:49:56 am »
The guy who owns the general store at Gila hot springs is also the guy who owns the cheapest campsite. He told me that the water has been tested and that it’s perfectly safe to drink. It is of course warm water, but makes a decent cup of coffee. I drank it the whole 4 or 5 days I stayed there and suffered no illness. The route also has cafes and shops close by.

I agree with those who say not to bother carrying a filter with you. The chances of using it on the southern tier are slim. There are plenty of opportunities to fill up on the route and you won’t likely go a day without at least one. I don’t remember many occasions where I couldn’t find my morning coffee and I tend to remember such events due to the trauma they cause.

My advice will be to plan your days to some extent to ensure you know where the water will likely be when you need it. Also, set off into dry areas with enough to last you an average day. You won’t use it all, but it gives peace of mind in case you break down etc.

Offline pedaler

Re: Drinking water
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2020, 04:16:02 am »
Very good response,  thanks a lot.