Author Topic: Security - locking your bike  (Read 2953 times)

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Offline Inge

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2020, 03:10:28 am »
The variations have to do mainly with the tire width and being able to attach a cable into the lock or not. Other than that I do not really know.

On my other bike I have 70 mm tyres and am using this lock (Frame Lock 5650L NR black OE (Art. no. 05185) https://www.abus.com/uk/Mobile-Security/Bike-Safety-and-Security/Locks/Frame-Locks/SHIELD-5650L   - this also for insurance purposes and it being the only lock that fit around these wide tyres  ;)

Offline KionoKitse

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2020, 12:09:24 pm »
Lots of really good ideas here. My number one point is to always have a bag of stuff that you can't afford to loose (phone, wallet, keys, etc) that you never part with. My second point is to make my bike look like a hassle to steal. Usually that involves a buch of heavy baggage, plenty of dust and mud and duct tape (usually this is taken care of by being on tour for a couple of days). Additionally I'll run anything through the spokes when I'm parked. Usually just some webbing that is holding the panniers together. This makes it impossible to ride off on and isn't easy to see given the additional junk on my bike. If I'm on tour and I know that I'll be leaving the bike some place for a while to go hiking or something I'll bring some braided steel cable with a lock to wrap around a tree and a small lock. If I'm camping and just staying the night, I'll run some of my tent poles through the frame so it will wake me up if someone tries to move the bike. In summary make your bike look not worth stealing and if someone tries to make it difficult for them to get away. Typically thieves would rather abort an attempt then risk getting caught.

Offline froze

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2020, 09:44:17 am »
The variations have to do mainly with the tire width and being able to attach a cable into the lock or not. Other than that I do not really know.

On my other bike I have 70 mm tyres and am using this lock (Frame Lock 5650L NR black OE (Art. no. 05185) https://www.abus.com/uk/Mobile-Security/Bike-Safety-and-Security/Locks/Frame-Locks/SHIELD-5650L   - this also for insurance purposes and it being the only lock that fit around these wide tyres  ;)

Did your insurance company specify any particular brands and models of locks that must be used?

I decided to go with Velo Insurance this month after replacing my previous touring bike due to a crash it might be wise to cover my new bike and my more expensive Lynskey.  I asked Velo if they had a list of required locks in order to make sure the theft part would be covered without any questions, and they said NO!  Just use any reasonable lock, so I asked them if my cable lock with the Abus lock was reasonable, and they said yes it was, though of course they reminded me it wasn't the most secure way, but I told them I never park the Lynskey anywhere that I can't see it, but the lock was more for the Masi touring bike when I'm at campgrounds and a store to buy supplies, and they said that lock would be fine. 

In 40 plus years I've used that same cable/lock, and locking up bikes with it while I was in college or at work I never had a theft attempt, even in Los Angeles.  I'm not saying for people who live in Los Angeles to use a simple cable lock, it just happened to work for me due to circumstances.

Anyway check with your insurance to see what they consider to be acceptable.  I do know that the frame lock you show would NOT be acceptable for Velo because you have to be able to lock the bike to a solid object, the lock you have would keep someone from riding off but they could just pick it up and run off with it, even though you and I know someone isn't going to just pick up a loaded touring bike and run off with it, but my insurance company said you have to lock the bike to something.

Offline hikerjer

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #18 on: May 27, 2020, 10:37:11 pm »
My home owners insurance is with Safeco/Liberty. I attached a rider to my policy which covers all my recreational gear - camping, skiing, bicycling, etc. I think it's around $25.00 a year and covers up to $3500.00 in loss, no deducible. Seems extremely reasonable to me.  Hopefully, I'll never have to find out if they are as good as their word/policy.

Offline froze

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2020, 10:47:48 pm »
State Farm wanted $375 a year for both of my bikes to be put on a floater, no deductible, but Velo wanted $160 with a $200 ded on one bike and $300 on the other, I took the cheapest deal. 

I can't believe Safeco only wanted $25 a year, if they cover loss due to accidents and theft you're getting a spectacular deal.  Read the floater page in your policy just to make sure you got what you think you got.

Offline hikerjer

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #20 on: May 27, 2020, 10:50:36 pm »
Ya, it does seem like a ridiculously good deal. Frankly, I was a bit shocked as well, but I've double and triple checked and it seems legit.  Might check it again, though.

Offline Inge

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2020, 02:34:00 am »
Froze - they just state that it has to be an ART2 certified lock - and yes this is accepted by the insurance. In the Netherlands lots of these locks are being used (especially on "city bikes") so all insurances do accept them as long as they are ART2 certified.

Offline froze

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2020, 09:37:33 am »
So does you lock Inge have a chain attached or no chain attached?  If it doesn't have a chain attached it's not worth much as a lock, because like I said before, if the bike isn't locked to something than someone can simply pick the bike up and run off with it, and work at breaking the lock at home.

I saw couple of those locks you have, one had a chain attached and one did not.  Like I said above, if it doesn't have a chain attached you need to get a lock to add to what you already have so you can lock the bike to a solid object.   

Even Velo insurance said the bike has to be locked to a solid object to be covered for theft, which only makes sense of course. 

But I would not rely on that lock you're talking about if there is no chain attached to it.  The one I saw with the chain is called Vinz Levanne Ring Lock, but I'm not sure if it's in production anymore because I couldn't find any place selling one or the company that makes it.

Offline Inge

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2020, 03:18:47 am »
As mentioned before it does not have a chain attached but it has the possibility to do so. On short trips around the house I do not bring my knogs cable but on longer road trips i do bring a cable to lock it to the world.

Offline hospengr

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2020, 11:43:58 pm »
I will be riding the Pacific Coast Route starting late August, solo.  I get it about locking the bike (or not), but what about the panniers while in camp, or going to the shower while in a state park campground?  Bike is locked, tent is up, panniers in tent, but there are still unscrupulous persons who go through "stuff" when no one is around.  I can certainly take valuables to the shower, but who wants to do that every day?
Any suggestions for security of panniers, even when at a restaurant or grocery store?
Thanks!

Offline John Nettles

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #25 on: July 18, 2020, 11:53:29 pm »
I always bring the very valuable stuff, i.e. wallet & phone with me regardless of where I go.  In 40+ years I have never had my stuff gone through, I least that I know of.  If I was concerned, I guess I could get a little luggage lock that would fit through the tent's zipper pulls.   Also, I have a long (about 15' or so) 1/8" coated cable that was made by my local Ace Hardware that I can insert through the pannier handle loops.  Of course, they could still go through but they could not get the panniers  ;D

That said, I have heard California's state parks are starting to get a bit overrun with homeless people.  It it is true, that may be more of an issue.  In which case, I would probably ask someone "reputable" to keep an eye on my tent site. 

Tailwinds, John

Offline hospengr

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #26 on: July 19, 2020, 12:33:18 am »
I always bring the very valuable stuff, i.e. wallet & phone with me regardless of where I go.  In 40+ years I have never had my stuff gone through, I least that I know of.  If I was concerned, I guess I could get a little luggage lock that would fit through the tent's zipper pulls.   Also, I have a long (about 15' or so) 1/8" coated cable that was made by my local Ace Hardware that I can insert through the pannier handle loops.  Of course, they could still go through but they could not get the panniers  ;D

That said, I have heard California's state parks are starting to get a bit overrun with homeless people.  It it is true, that may be more of an issue.  In which case, I would probably ask someone "reputable" to keep an eye on my tent site. 

Thanks John!

Offline staehpj1

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2020, 06:20:54 am »
I have never had my stuff gone through
I will say that I have, but only by raccoons and only where there was a food odor.  They are very adept with zippers and some buckles.  As far as items lost to humans thieves, the only ones were a few things out in plain sight or tucked under a bungee or strap.  Some of the latter I was not positive if they were lost or stolen.  It was a pretty rare occurrence in my experiences and usually on hind sight I had left the item in question in a pretty tempting position where some kid had snagged it on a whim.

Offline John Nettles

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #28 on: July 19, 2020, 08:27:07 am »
OK, I forgot to include the thieving rotten little scoundrels.  Yes, I have been gotten by raccoons too on a couple of occasions.  And I have lost a few thinks such as shirts, shoes, etc. that were strapped to the rear rack but that was not stolen.  Sort of sucks to get to camp and find out you only have one camp shoe and the nearest place to buy shoes is 3 days ahead.



Offline staehpj1

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2020, 09:16:52 am »
OK, I forgot to include the thieving rotten little scoundrels.  Yes, I have been gotten by raccoons too on a couple of occasions.  And I have lost a few thinks such as shirts, shoes, etc. that were strapped to the rear rack but that was not stolen.  Sort of sucks to get to camp and find out you only have one camp shoe and the nearest place to buy shoes is 3 days ahead.
The stolen or suspected stolen items I have had that I can remember were:
  • A pair of crocs clipped on to the rear rack with a locking biner.  I figure they wanted the biner  and just took the crocs with it.  That was outside a store.
  • A mini pump tucked under the straps on the rear rack.  It went missing when I was in a Walmart.  Pretty sure it was a theft.
  • A cell phone left charging in the men's room at "Oh Kentucky Campground".  I am all but positive it was stolen by the maintenance guy at the campground.  I had a ton of circumstantial evidence and he acted very suspiciously, but I didn't have enough to get my phone back or to pursue it with the police given that I probably wouldn't get anywhere and would lose a day.
Given the number of days I have toured I figure that isn't much.  The only one that was a big deal at all was the phone.

That doesn't count the stuff taken by furry critters but I haven't done bag with them either.  There is one particular front pannier that I once forgot a and left powerbar in, a raccoon opened it chewed and slobbered the powerbar up real good eating half of it before zipping it back up.  When I found it a day or two later the sent had permanently penetrated the pannier.  That pannier now always seems to get opened by raccoons and the contents strewn on the ground.  More often than not after emptying that pocket they zip it back up.  I haven't used that pannier in years, but I bet they'd still smell that powerbar and open that pocket.