Author Topic: Security - locking your bike  (Read 9896 times)

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Offline Inge

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #45 on: May 25, 2021, 02:33:57 am »
John -
Quote
the differences between the Trelock ring locks?  I went to the website and there are several variations of the same model, i.e. RS-453 POC (AZ, NAZ, Balloon)
- they vary in the tyre width and whether or not you want the ZR 355 plug-in chai.
Main differences between the varius ring locks is the tyre width.

Offline hikerjer

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #46 on: May 25, 2021, 03:55:46 pm »
A related queston:  which is more theft proof, a subtantial cable or a good chain. I know a u-lock is probably best but I'm locking the bike to a trailer and the geomery of both will not allow for a u-lock without a subsantial investment in a welding job. I also know no lock system is prefect.  Just looking for recommendations/suggestions.

Thanks.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #47 on: May 25, 2021, 04:07:05 pm »
It is my understanding that a cable is harder to cut and provides more protection per ounce of weight. That is of course an opinion and if you ask 10 cyclists you will get 12 opinions.  ;D
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline froze

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #48 on: May 26, 2021, 12:36:29 am »
It is my understanding that a cable is harder to cut and provides more protection per ounce of weight. That is of course an opinion and if you ask 10 cyclists you will get 12 opinions.  ;D

All you have to do is search YouTube videos of people cutting various materials, and a cable can be cut with a pair of cheap pocket snips like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Channellock-E337CB-7-Inch-Diagonal-Cutting/dp/B00D3R66O6

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #49 on: May 26, 2021, 08:28:19 am »
A hardened logging chain can be cut.  It's kind of entertaining to watch the guys at the hardware store (where they have the right tools) cussing as they try to cut a piece for you.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #50 on: May 26, 2021, 09:23:42 am »
A hardened logging chain can be cut.  It's kind of entertaining to watch the guys at the hardware store (where they have the right tools) cussing as they try to cut a piece for you.
Yeah last time I saw them cut some at the hardware store they used a 4' bolt cutter it must have weighed 50 pounds, a big clunky awkward tool.

And yet a smaller lighter battery angle grinder goes through it like butter.  I guess the hardware store doesn't want all the flying sparks.  A thief probably doesn't mind them.  Angle grinders are great tools sadly they are great for dishonest folks too.

The good news is that theft isn't a huge problem on tour in most places with a little care.  In the higher risk places you just need to take greater care.  Perhaps at some point in my touring career I will lose my bike and gear, but I figure that is just a small risk that is baked into the sport.  Having gear you can afford to replace takes some of the sting out of it.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #51 on: June 08, 2021, 04:31:01 am »
I will be riding the Pacific Coast Route starting late August, solo.  I get it about locking the bike (or not), but what about the panniers while in camp, or going to the shower while in a state park campground?  Bike is locked, tent is up, panniers in tent, but there are still unscrupulous persons who go through "stuff" when no one is around.  I can certainly take valuables to the shower, but who wants to do that every day?
Any suggestions for security of panniers, even when at a restaurant or grocery store?
Thanks!

It is a problem. I never liked the feeling I got knowing that when I went into a food store, things could be missing when I got back to the bike. If you go through the experiences and advice in this thread, you will have the information you need to maximize the security of your things on tour.

Offline froze

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #52 on: June 08, 2021, 10:28:17 am »
short of taking your bicycle into the shower with you, or into a store, there isn't much you can do to prevent someone from rifling through your panniers.  If you're panniers have grab straps or they can be connected together you can disconnect them and throw them on your shoulder or carry them in like suitcases, but that's a hassle as well, plus there is other stuff on the bike that you simply can't take it all inside with you.  The only option you have is to place the bike near a window so you can see the bike while inside a store, and take a seat next to the window that the bike is parked against if in a restaurant, that's what I do, I find an empty seat from outside first put the bike next to that window then go inside and request that window or set at that window table.  I've never had anyone bother my bike, and others I spoke to about that possibility have never had their bikes bothered either when touring, but there is that thing in the back of anyone's head that tells you, or bugs you, that someone could someday mess with your stuff, so you don't want to get lackadaisical about it, but at the same time not get so paranoid about it that it ruins the fun in touring or camping.

I did buy a better locking system for my bike, but I'm not going to use while touring due to the weight of it, but it is a heavy smallest gauge chain that Abus sells, and then I got a Masterlock combo lock that I will take to use on my cable when camping because it's a lot lighter than the chain and I don't want to carry more weight, and the combo lock is so I don't lose my key accidently while camping or touring.  I use the chain and combo lock at work now.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #53 on: June 08, 2021, 09:53:52 pm »
I believe that the risk is much lower outside larger cities, but I don’t have any data to support that belief. I only carry a small, lightweight lock, but I take the bike inside when possible, and try to keep it in view if I can (which is not always possible).

There’s always risk.

You do not need data on that. If you are inside in a small town, only a few people will see your bicycle. In a large city during rush hour hundreds will see it in the same space of time. That greatly increases the odds that a grab and run thief will come along. It stands to reason. Like any other crime.  You are much more likely to be attacked and robbed in Philadelphia, a big city, than in Yeehaw Junction, Florida, a very small town. It is a fact.

Offline froze

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #54 on: June 09, 2021, 12:06:19 am »
I believe that the risk is much lower outside larger cities, but I don’t have any data to support that belief. I only carry a small, lightweight lock, but I take the bike inside when possible, and try to keep it in view if I can (which is not always possible).

There’s always risk.


You do not need data on that. If you are inside in a small town, only a few people will see your bicycle. In a large city during rush hour hundreds will see it in the same space of time. That greatly increases the odds that a grab and run thief will come along. It stands to reason. Like any other crime.  You are much more likely to be attacked and robbed in Philadelphia, a big city, than in Yeehaw Junction, Florida, a very small town. It is a fact.


I'm not disagreeing with what you said because you are correct, but I did talk to a few people I ran into who tour across the US and Europe and parked their loaded touring bikes unlocked in big cities and never had a problem, of course they try to keep their eyes near it but some said they wouldn't see the bike for an hour and it was still there.  Personally I wouldn't do that, but they seem to think that people won't bother someone who is touring?  Hmm, I don't know, but that's what they said.  Maybe they have insurance on the bike and are hoping it gets stolen?  Either way I'm not going to go touring with a 5 pound or so locking system, just a cable and a combo lock which means I would have to keep an eye on it insured or not.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #55 on: June 09, 2021, 05:39:19 pm »
Damn! I live in Philadelphia. Better stop doing tours from my front door despite the only place anyone tried to steal anything from me was in a campground Yeehaw, Wyoming. (It was actually DuBois, but I think you get the point.)

BTW...”More likely” doesn’t necessarily mean “likely.” It’s a fact.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2021, 05:41:06 pm by BikeliciousBabe »

Offline stoverix

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #56 on: October 25, 2021, 04:41:06 pm »
A good lock is essential for every bike. If you have the possibility, you should store your bike inside of your house. It's safer than any lock. You can get the most expensive one and someone is still going to find a way to cut it. Another good option would be to get cyclist insurance since you can never be too sure about this. It's crucial to have your back assured, it doesn't matter if we are talking about the bike or you. Never neglect this part, since it can cost you a lot later. You'll not regret this investment, even if you'll never need it.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2021, 11:21:26 am by stoverix »

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Security - locking your bike
« Reply #57 on: October 27, 2021, 01:19:50 pm »
A good lock is essential for every bike. If you have the possibility, you should store your bike inside of your house. It's safer than any lock.
Kind of hard to leave the bike at home when you’re out on tour.

That aside, I’ve been locking bikes outside on the streets of Philly (and other places) for decades. The only place I’ve had one stolen from is my house, while I was home and awake. Go figure.