Author Topic: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics  (Read 4209 times)

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Offline John Nelson

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2020, 09:41:48 am »
Do these TSA restrictions apply to alcohol and alcohol stoves? After all, the TSA allows you to fly with a bottle of bourbon, so would there be a difference?

Online staehpj1

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2020, 09:52:51 am »
Do these TSA restrictions apply to alcohol and alcohol stoves? After all, the TSA allows you to fly with a bottle of bourbon, so would there be a difference?
Pretty sure it is a no go.  That unless you are willing to use 140 proof or less drinking alcohol and carry an unopened bottle.

From TSA site:
"Alcoholic beverages with more than 24% but not more than 70% alcohol are limited in checked bags to 5 liters (1.3 gallons) per passenger and must be in unopened retail packaging. Alcoholic beverages with 24% alcohol or less are not subject to limitations in checked bags. "

Offline John Nelson

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2020, 12:16:32 pm »
Thanks Pete for finding that TSA reference.

I have carried cooking alcohol in my checked luggage in unmarked plastic containers. That's just because I don't want to be burdened to go find a store that sells alcohol immediately upon arrival. I've done it several times without problems, but apparently I was violating TSA rules. So I guess I was just lucky. I'm pretty sure the TSA did open that luggage, but I guess they didn't find my alcohol, or didn't know what it was. It wouldn't have been the end of the world if they had confiscated it.

Online staehpj1

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2020, 12:50:39 pm »
Thanks Pete for finding that TSA reference.

I have carried cooking alcohol in my checked luggage in unmarked plastic containers. That's just because I don't want to be burdened to go find a store that sells alcohol immediately upon arrival. I've done it several times without problems, but apparently I was violating TSA rules. So I guess I was just lucky. I'm pretty sure the TSA did open that luggage, but I guess they didn't find my alcohol, or didn't know what it was. It wouldn't have been the end of the world if they had confiscated it.
Yeah I always found it a pain to immediately need to find fuel at the start of a tour especially since I like to ride right out of the airport.  I may be inclined to try taking some in the approved 3.4 ounce bottle of liquid in a my quart sized bag with toiletries.  That would be enough to allow time to run across a source for more.  I am sure I could tell a plausible enough story as to why I'd be carrying it if they were to ask and worst case they'd take it.

Offline David W Pratt

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Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2021, 04:51:04 pm »
Two things I do, YMMV. 
I disconnect the stove and fuel canister.  One trip I left  them connected over night and ran out in a few days.  I think there must have been a tiny leak even with the valve turned off.  Subsequently, the fuel lasts a lot longer.
For pasta, I use couscous, it cooks very quickly, thus saving food.
On a trail like the GAP or the C&O, you could easily buy as you go and/or eat in restaurants, etc.  They have lots of services.

Online staehpj1

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2021, 05:03:12 pm »
I'd just find a store open, consider it a form of *SPAM LINK REMOVED*, travel light, find something you'll use all the way through and has a recyclable container and be on your merry. As much as I know, you have restrictions for your handbag or the carry-on, regarding the checked bag, there shouldn’t be so many requirements.
Another older thread revived by a new troll account to post spam links.  A constant issue here these days.  Reported to mods hopefully they will remove the link in the post and disable the account.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2021, 05:58:25 pm »
I think it is a little more of a concern than getting caught. Think back to a plane crash in 1996, I think in Florida, where oxygen canisters were placed in a cargo hold and I believe exploded and took the plane down.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/how-the-1996-valujet-crash-changed-air-safety-regulations/ar-BB1gCRQz
How the 1996 ValuJet Crash Changed Air Safety Regulations
"...changes that have been implemented to keep the cargo clear of anything that can catch fire."
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Offline Ty0604

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2022, 05:32:12 pm »
Two things I do, YMMV. 
I disconnect the stove and fuel canister.  One trip I left  them connected over night and ran out in a few days.  I think there must have been a tiny leak even with the valve turned off.  Subsequently, the fuel lasts a lot longer.
For pasta, I use couscous, it cooks very quickly, thus saving food.
On a trail like the GAP or the C&O, you could easily buy as you go and/or eat in restaurants, etc.  They have lots of services.

I too always disconnect the fuel canister from the stove. I was backpacking once and didn’t do as such and the canister ran out overnight. Ate cold food the last few days. It wasn’t pleasant.
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Offline froze

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2022, 07:31:06 pm »
You're lucky that fuel didn't get into the food and or pots and pans, or clothing, etc, that would have made you very hungry or without clothes.

I put my fuel cannister in a plastic zip lock bag, even though supposedly they can't leak if you don't have your stove screwed into it, but a friend of mine had their fuel cannister leak and there was nothing screwed into it, got that fuel all over their pots and pans and they had to wash them several times to get that stench off the stuff.  I'm weird though, I have a lot of my stuff in zip lock bags to keep stuff from leaking and getting on something, and or stinking up and staining the inside of the pannier, but to also make sure my panniers doesn't get stained and stinky I line them with trash bags. 

I also line my handlebar bag with a trash bag that I've cut to size, but the Topeak Tour Guide DX I have is water resistant it is not water proof even with the rain cover on it!  Ask me how I know.  So now as extra precaution against water getting in, I lined it with a trash bag then roll it shut over my stuff then close the bag up and no more wet stuff.  Then anything I want to make sure not to get wet I put those in zip lock bags.  All that bagging seems crazy, but I want to make sure nothing gets wet and ruin something.

I use a heavy-duty trash bag made for outdoor gardening trash, I tried a trash can liner and it was too thin and developed holes in it, that has not happened with the outdoor heavy-duty trash bags.

Sorry for the side notes.

Offline Ty0604

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2022, 12:24:09 am »
You're lucky that fuel didn't get into the food and or pots and pans, or clothing, etc, that would have made you very hungry or without clothes.

It was sitting outside the tent overnight. Regardless I’m like you except I have everything in compression sacks. Keeps everything neat and if something breaks/spills it’s limited to what’s damaged.
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Offline Scotty0424

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #25 on: January 09, 2022, 02:34:32 pm »
Has anyone used Huel? Supposedly you can make as much or as little as you want and they have some appealing flavors = green curry, mac and cheese, etc. Just add hot water. .... I guess

https://huel.com/?gclid=CjwKCAiArOqOBhBmEiwAsgeLmaDHi2XmNEyCAdXHrpuILCGr5fSCz6NQ-KDjh4cpPrW0cWElmAo84xoCUhQQAvD_BwE

Offline froze

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #26 on: January 09, 2022, 05:15:56 pm »
Has anyone used Huel? Supposedly you can make as much or as little as you want and they have some appealing flavors = green curry, mac and cheese, etc. Just add hot water. .... I guess

https://huel.com/?gclid=CjwKCAiArOqOBhBmEiwAsgeLmaDHi2XmNEyCAdXHrpuILCGr5fSCz6NQ-KDjh4cpPrW0cWElmAo84xoCUhQQAvD_BwE

I never heard of them, at first it appeared that 3 meals were $75!  I was LMAO until I found out in the fine print that there were 7 meals in each bag, thus you have to buy 3 bags and get 21 meals for a cost of $3.76 per meal.  Assuming those meals are filling after being on a bike all day, then that's a good deal.  Problem with this sort of stuff is that if you're touring you can't take 3 months' worth of food with you, in fact you wouldn't even be able to carry 3 bags, not sure how big those bags are but probably at the very most you could carry is 1 bag or 7 days of dinner only meals, or 3.5 days of lunch and dinner.  So once you run out, you'll have to go to a store and buy food, so you might as well go on YouTube University and find out how to eat backpacking food cheap by shopping grocery stores because you're going to end up in a grocery store having to buy that sort of food.

I also noticed Huel was plant-based protein, some people, like myself, cannot extract enough protein from plants to sustain themselves and will be always low on energy.  I tried a vegan diet when I was racing years ago for about 6 months, it was the worst 6 months for energy I ever had, even after our vegan expert friend tweaked it to increase the protein, I still was very low on energy, once we got off the diet my energy levels went back to normal.

The other thing is that Huel is high in fiber, some people will get diarrhea from too high of fiber, not something you want to deal with while touring.  I'm not sure if what their using is too high or not, but remember, everyone is different, what's fine with one person could be too high for the next.  In addition to that they use a lot of hot spice, probably in an attempt to cover up the nasty taste that their food has on their own without spice, but those spices can cause diarrhea in some people as well, as does curry and coconut have that potential.  So, you have a quadruple whammy for diarrhea potential.  So, you would need to buy it and try all the meals BEFORE you go on a trip so you will know whether or not they would make you sick.  Even too much energy drink while cycling like when touring can cause diarrhea issues.

I think you need to learn what to get at a grocery store since that's where you'll end up pretty quickly into a tour, and start your tours with that same food without buying special camping food.  Always try out food and drink before going on a tour, especially camping specific foods, and energy drinks, and when trying it out ride your bike for a 5 or so hours like you would do touring except you would circle back home, then eat and drink that stuff and see what happens. 

Regardless, you should always carry Imodium AD as part of your emergency stuff, just in case.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2022, 11:18:21 am »
Has anyone used Huel? Supposedly you can make as much or as little as you want and they have some appealing flavors = green curry, mac and cheese, etc. Just add hot water. .... I guess

https://huel.com/?gclid=CjwKCAiArOqOBhBmEiwAsgeLmaDHi2XmNEyCAdXHrpuILCGr5fSCz6NQ-KDjh4cpPrW0cWElmAo84xoCUhQQAvD_BwE

If you have to guess that should tell you something.  I looked at their food and can't figure it out either.

Just eat real food.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2022, 12:47:44 pm »
Just eat real food.

Totally agree - you have to learn to cook what you can find and listen to your body. It is amazing how some olive oil and a clove of sautéed fresh garlic can transform Dollar General fare into a gourmet meal. Learn to cook in one pot, develop some go-to spice mixes you can carry, watch for fresh produce that carries well like zucchini, look for foil packets of chicken or tuna - even canned in a pinch. Eating can become more than a chore, it can be an adventure. Most people wind up with hours to kill in camp on many days - use it to procure and prep some decent meals.
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Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Solo Trip Cooking Logistics
« Reply #29 on: January 13, 2022, 09:22:26 am »
Just eat real food.

Totally agree - you have to learn to cook what you can find and listen to your body. It is amazing how some olive oil and a clove of sautéed fresh garlic can transform Dollar General fare into a gourmet meal. Learn to cook in one pot, develop some go-to spice mixes you can carry, watch for fresh produce that carries well like zucchini, look for foil packets of chicken or tuna - even canned in a pinch. Eating can become more than a chore, it can be an adventure. Most people wind up with hours to kill in camp on many days - use it to procure and prep some decent meals.

Heh. While I cook with two pots (they nest, so no extra volume to carry), I regularly eat foil packed-tuna and zucchini.  Fresh garlic, salt, pepper and Aleppo pepper flakes are staples along with olive oil and almost always a reserve amount of pasta.  Garlic, olive oil and and salt alone makes a good emergency meal if there is nothing else available.