Author Topic: Lube when long distance touring  (Read 1646 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Lube when long distance touring
« Reply #30 on: July 14, 2020, 01:47:44 pm »
If you apply lube at random intervals, does rotating the chain really spread the lube to the rest of the links?
Absolutely. Recently lubed my LHT's chain during a three-day tour the week before July 4th after a storm the first evening. Maybe 6 random drops. Spun the chain then wiped down the sides. Still quiet as a mouse.

Offline TCS

Re: Lube when long distance touring
« Reply #31 on: July 15, 2020, 01:28:24 pm »
The one exception that comes to mind is the old method of dipping the chain in melted paraffin which I stopped using decades ago and never used on a tour.  ...  I think there a (very) few still doing this method though.

Commercially available & 'winner' of a chain lube test:

https://moltenspeedwax.com/

and a competitor:

https://silca.cc/products/secret-chain-wax-blend

 ;)
"My name is Pither.  I am at present on a cycling tour of the North Cornwall area taking in Bude and..."

Offline TCS

Re: Lube when long distance touring
« Reply #32 on: July 15, 2020, 01:55:30 pm »
Somewhere there's a Gates (or Veer) belt user silently laughing.

Quote
I’m hesitant to name the product as chain lube debates are almost religious.

Quote
Perhaps only saddle choice brings out more personal opinions than lubes.

 ;D ;D ;D

Fun fact: 3inOne oil (these days marketed as 'Multipurpose Oil', with a black label) was put on the market in 1894.  The name came from the product's promise to 'clean, lubricate and rustproof' - i.e. three benefits in one treatment.  And what was it supposed to perform these feats on?  Bicycle chains!  You can do better in 2020, but amazingly enough after 126 years, there are other chain lubrication products available at your LBS that don't perform as well in tests.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2020, 08:23:02 pm by TCS »
"My name is Pither.  I am at present on a cycling tour of the North Cornwall area taking in Bude and..."

Offline TCS

Re: Lube when long distance touring
« Reply #33 on: July 15, 2020, 02:18:51 pm »
Some 40 years ago the automatic Scottoiler system was developed for chain-driven motorcycles.  It's remained a viable but nitche product.

A few years back Scottoiler spun off an automatic chain re-oiler system for bicycles:

http://flaer.com/revo-via/

While I've wondered if it would have some application to long distance cycletouring, I don't know anyone who has used one nor have I ever seen the (bicycle) system given a long term test in the electronic or forest-products media.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2020, 02:38:58 pm by TCS »
"My name is Pither.  I am at present on a cycling tour of the North Cornwall area taking in Bude and..."

Offline PNWRider92

Re: Lube when long distance touring
« Reply #34 on: July 17, 2020, 11:54:48 pm »
I personally don’t bring chain lube on tour. I’m more than happy to swing into a bike shop and give them a few bucks to use whatever they have in the shop.

Personal preference but I’m picky about weight and it’s worth it for me.
Instagram: tyjames0604

Wisconsin --> Washington ---> Colorado

Offline John Nelson

Re: Lube when long distance touring
« Reply #35 on: July 18, 2020, 04:43:21 pm »
I personally don’t bring chain lube on tour. I’m more than happy to swing into a bike shop and give them a few bucks to use whatever they have in the shop.

Personal preference but I’m picky about weight and it’s worth it for me.
I do take lube, but I certainly don't take any more than necessary. I know how many drops of lube it takes to lube my chain, I can compute how many times I'll need to lube based on the length of the tour, and I take a container that only holds that many drops. One issue that lube is smelly, so you want to wrap it very well so that your clothes don't all smell like lube.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Lube when long distance touring
« Reply #36 on: July 18, 2020, 05:09:05 pm »
Great, thanks.  There were some people that would actually use a spray solvent and clean the chain every month, but I really don't want to be doing that or carrying a bottle around.
I am a little late to the party on this, but some of us, myself included, believe that solvent or detergents do more harm than good by allowing more grit to get deeper into the chain.  I can't prove it, but I read it way back when on Sheldon Brown's site and it made sense to me.  I made it a practice and have had really good results wrt chain life by using solvents and detergents almost never.  The rare exception has been when a chain got gunked up with something that couldn't be gotten off without harsher treatment.  In those very rare cases I have bought a can of WD40 cleaned the chain with it and given the remainder away if on tour.  I think I have done that twice over the years.