Author Topic: Salsa Cutthroat vs. Co-Motion Cascadia  (Read 271 times)

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Offline thouse59

Salsa Cutthroat vs. Co-Motion Cascadia
« on: November 11, 2020, 08:42:45 pm »
Hi,
I've narrowed my search for a new ride to the Salsa Cutthroat gravel bike and the Co-Motion Cascadia touring bike.  They both have a pretty long wheelbase, which I like for handling and keeping my big feet from hitting rear panniers.  I like the weight of the Cutthroat, but the Cascadia isn't that much heavier; maybe 3 or 4 lbs. from what I understand.

I want a multi-purpose bike, from touring across the country in a few years to dirt roads and occasional trails.  The decision I'm wrestling with is this:  tour with a true gravel bike that can handle the weight (I believe the Salsa can do that), or bomb some dirt roads / trails by putting a wider tire on a touring bike.  If I go with the Salsa, I'd probably use a smoother 40-42mm tire.  If the Co-Motion, I might crank the tire up to 38 or so.

Any suggestions based on experience?  Links below.
Thanks, Tim

https://salsacycles.com/bikes/cutthroat/2020_cutthroat_grx_600
https://co-motion.com/collections/single-bikes/products/cascadia

Offline Inge

Re: Salsa Cutthroat vs. Co-Motion Cascadia
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2020, 12:52:53 am »
I do not know what max tyre both bikes take but I would not go for a bike that can not at least take a 50mm tyre. I like this for comfort a lot and gives better grip/ handling on gravel. On my bomb tour proof bike I currentkly have 70mm tyres which gives even more grip/ comfort

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Salsa Cutthroat vs. Co-Motion Cascadia
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2020, 08:57:49 am »
No experience here with either bike, so take this for whatever it's worth.

First, I have to smile when I read something like "I wouldn't ride a bike that can't take a size X tire."  To some extent, I think tires are like gears.  Just like there's always a route too steep to ride with some gearing, there's always going to be a route with rocks too big to comfortably ride with some size tire.  (Though, to be honest, I'd probably be hiking instead of biking a trail where 3" tires were too small.)

I really think OP may be looking at two different bikes.  You'd be hauling a lot of extra weight in the wheels to take a fat bike cross country (although I'm sure people have tried, and perhaps even succeeded).  And while I'd prefer something in the 30-40 mm tire size to go cross country, I've found gravel roads and sandy roads that 38s couldn't handle gracefully.  So perhaps you want to think about a cross country bike AND a gravel bike.  Start by buying the bike you'll ride most near home, and ride it a lot.  Check in with a local bike club or bike shop to find out what gravel is close by, and what you need to ride it comfortably, if that's your choice.  Bicycle commuting is kind of similar to touring, except with a lighter load, if there's not some good gravel close by.

FWIW, if you've got to drive 5 hours each way to get to gravel or MTB trails, so you'll only end up riding every other weekend in the summer, that does not meet my definition of "ride it a lot."

Offline Iowagriz

Re: Salsa Cutthroat vs. Co-Motion Cascadia
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2020, 09:50:34 am »
Cutthroat does not have eyelets for panniers that I remember, or can see on the current pictures.  Certainly there are ways around that, but a bikepacking seatbag is what the Cutthroat is normally outfitted with.

Offline RonK

Salsa Cutthroat vs. Co-Motion Cascadia
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2020, 05:11:17 pm »
The Cutthroat is a race mountain bike built for the GDMBR and is not intended to be weighed down with panniers. It's actually a race version of the Salsa Fargo - the logical choice for bikepacking (or touring with panniers if you must).

This is my Fargo loaded with three seasons camping gear and clothing for a month long back roads tour in New Zealand during autumn. It is my do everything bike. I have a second set of wheels so I can join my local bunch rides when not bikepacking.

If you want lighter and have deep pockets there is a titanium frame available. Built to your specification it's probably price-comparable with a Cutty or Co-Motion and looks fantastic. https://salsacycles.com/bikes/fargo/2019_fargo_ti_frameset

There is a very good Salsa Fargo page on FB. https://www.facebook.com/groups/salsafargo

I've done plenty of full dress touring in the past, but would never go back from my current setup.

« Last Edit: November 12, 2020, 06:55:24 pm by RonK »
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

Offline jrswenberger

Re: Salsa Cutthroat vs. Co-Motion Cascadia
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2020, 06:59:11 pm »
Getting one bike to fulfill multiple, diverse roles will always include compromises. Some of these can be overcome with accessories or additional gear, i.e. a second, lighter pair of wheels for an unloaded touring bike.

I'd recommend making a list of all the characteristics, ideal and nice to have, you'd like for this single bike, be generous and honest with yourself. Then circle those characteristics that are absolutes FOR YOU. Start with the bike that best matches your absolutes. Then look at the rest of the list and work out what it would take for your best match bike to meet more of the non-absolutes you've identified. If you're initially chosen bike can't be modified enough in a reasonable way to make you happy, move on to the next best match for your absolutes. Rinse and repeat.

Maybe the bike you need in the near future isn't the bike you'll need in a few years. If you start out with two or three bikes, this process likely won't take too long. However, you may quickly find yourself in need of a bigger list...Good Luck!

Jay
Enjoy the ride!
ACA Life Member 368

Offline Inge

Re: Salsa Cutthroat vs. Co-Motion Cascadia
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2020, 12:36:55 am »
pat
Quote
First, I have to smile when I read something like "I wouldn't ride a bike that can't take a size X tire."  To some extent, I think tires are like gears.
. You are very likely right about this. Though I have had bikes with tyres varying from 28mm till 70mm and I have noticed that no matter the terrain I tend to like the fatter tyres way better.

But in the end like with all things it is a personal preference.

Offline thouse59

Re: Salsa Cutthroat vs. Co-Motion Cascadia
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2020, 09:34:25 am »
Thanks for the replies.  Both are great bikes, and the Fargo looks great too.  They should all fit my gangly 6'3" frame.   I know that trying to get a bike for all reasons can be a bit of a challenge.