Author Topic: Best Tips for Cooking on the Road  (Read 1547 times)

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Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Best Tips for Cooking on the Road
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2020, 07:54:17 am »
I always carry fresh garlic and olive oil. Per ounce, oils, like olive oil, give you some of the highest calories per ounce of weight. Plus, when your meal prep starts with garlic sautéed in olive oil you are instantly the envy of the rest of the camp. My camp Mac and Cheese -- sauté garlic and crushed red pepper until the garlic starts to brown. Add 2 cups of water. As soon as it starts to boil (I use a Jetboil pot, so that is fast) add the pasta. When that hits boil, turn down heat, cover and simmer until the water is almost gone. Add the cheese pack and stir. The olive oil makes up for the lack of butter and is much healthier. We now make it at home almost the same way, but usually skip the garlic and pepper and put the olive oil in just before the cheese pack.
Long Distance Hiker - AT Thru-hike 2007
Long distance cyclist - multi day tours - TDF tour Alpes 2005
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline John Nettles

Re: Best Tips for Cooking on the Road
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2020, 08:57:27 am »
I agree that oil & garlic is a great start to any dinner.  As is butter and onions.  Add a chicken breast or pork chop to either and you are good to go.

The M&C sounds good except I can't stand the Kraft-style M&C so I make with real grated cheddar cheese, crackers (restaurant individual packs), butter, and salt & pepper. Not quite the same as when baked but still not too bad.



Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Best Tips for Cooking on the Road
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2020, 06:11:29 pm »
If you are lucky you can find chicken breast in a foil pack like tuna fish. I really can't stand the taste of fish for the most part so I am always so happy to find the chicken packs. Just the name "fish tacos" tends to make me gag. :)
Long Distance Hiker - AT Thru-hike 2007
Long distance cyclist - multi day tours - TDF tour Alpes 2005
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline froze

Re: Best Tips for Cooking on the Road
« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2020, 07:29:23 pm »
If you are lucky you can find chicken breast in a foil pack like tuna fish. I really can't stand the taste of fish for the most part so I am always so happy to find the chicken packs. Just the name "fish tacos" tends to make me gag. :)

My main meat when camping is chicken, and I buy it in the foil pack, stays fresh with no need to refrigerate.   I also do the tuna in a foil pack too.  But I agree, fish and tacos don't seem to go well together personally.  I usually eat the tuna just straight out of the foil instead of putting it in something, the chicken I will make a taco with it, or blend it with top ramen.  Like I said before, I'm not a chef, in fact, I'm not even remotely good at cooking, so I just easy stupid stuff.