Author Topic: Off the Bike Shoes  (Read 2095 times)

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Offline misterflask

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2020, 08:26:46 am »
I have carried:
Merrill trail runners, about a pound for the pair.  Make passable hiking shoes and are comfy.
A pair of slippers I picked up during a tour at Dollar General.  Less than a half pound, I expect.  Good to pad around camp.
Cheap foam flip-flops.  Just a few ounces. 

I've been eyeing the disposable flip-flops they issue after a pedicure.  Wouldn't last long and clearly aren't hikable, but weight and packspace would be negligible.

I ride with Shimano MTB SPD shoes.  They are comfy on the bike, and theoretically hikable, but i don't want to try it.  In the evening my feet want something different.
I like riding in my Shimano SPD sandals and they are super comfy off the bike, but it seems like grit gets under the straps and I fear them for a long ride.

Anybody toured with Power Straps?  Seems like that would solve the one-shoe conundrum.  I would have a pair but they really price-punish the big-footed.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #16 on: December 29, 2020, 09:24:08 am »
Cheap foam flip-flops.  Just a few ounces. 

I've been eyeing the disposable flip-flops they issue after a pedicure.  Wouldn't last long and clearly aren't hikable, but weight and packspace would be negligible.
I have considered trying the "Genesis - Lightweight, Packable, Travel-Friendly Sandal".  They look like they would be a pretty light but durable option.  They seem to be inspired by huaraches "barefoot" running sandals.  They come in at 4.6 ounces for men's size 9.  They claim the sole is guaranteed for 5000 miles. https://xeroshoes.com/shop/genesis/genesis-men/

They look interesting enough that I decided to order a pair.  It looks like they must be discontinued because most sellers are out of most sizes, but with some searching I found a pair in my size (12).

Also there are lots of YouTube videos for DIY huaraches.

Quote
Anybody toured with Power Straps?  Seems like that would solve the one-shoe conundrum.  I would have a pair but they really price-punish the big-footed.
I didn't like them.  Maybe if I had given them more time, but I found them kind of awkward to get into and out of especially with regular running shoes.   If they were tight enough to do any good I didn't like the way they squeezed my feet.  Not sure if I'd get used to them in time or not, but I don't plan to try.  I also like that clipless forces consistent foot placement.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2020, 09:29:31 am by staehpj1 »

Offline cyclist alan

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #17 on: January 28, 2021, 06:14:59 am »
I bike and walk in the same shoes -- I would recommend Northwave shoes as its best for off biking as well > you can check out more from the list here:-https://bikesreviewed.com/gear/best-winter-cycling-shoes/

Offline staehpj1

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #18 on: January 28, 2021, 07:32:33 am »
I have considered trying the "Genesis - Lightweight, Packable, Travel-Friendly Sandal".  They look like they would be a pretty light but durable option.
I have received these and worn them around home for a while.  They look like the exact model may be discontinued, but some sizes may be available or similar models may be.  Any way I think they may be a good match for some users.  I plan to carry them on some tours and to wear them in my canoe.

Offline froze

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2021, 10:38:21 pm »
I tried the two shoe thing, and quite honestly I didn't like the extra weight or space the 2nd pair of shoes took, but that's just me.  So I started taking just one pair and it worked out pretty well but the shoes were cheap and didn't last long, so I just bought a pair of Specialized Recon 1.0 and I think their great, I can walk without issues or clanking from the cleat, and clip in with no problems.  They also make a Recon 2.0, that one uses a boa system to tighten the shoes instead of velcro straps, otherwise the shoes are identical, quite personally I thought the velcro straps were more comfortable, I could feel the wire going through the tongue of the shoe and pressing into my feet with the boa thing, but that's just me, so for the $50 price difference I got the 1.0.

I do tend to be a tightwad when spending money for stuff, so some of you are probably laughing at $100 pair of shoes, but I had a moderately expensive road shoe and the darn thing only lasted 5 years, so I bought a cheaper set and they're lasting just as long with even a bit more comfort, so money isn't necessarily the dominating rule to getting a better product.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2021, 02:16:43 pm »
https://xeroshoes.com/shop/sandals/z-trail-men/

5.4 ounces for size 9. Also good for scuzzy shower use.

Offline froze

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2021, 10:00:09 pm »
https://xeroshoes.com/shop/sandals/z-trail-men/

5.4 ounces for size 9. Also good for scuzzy shower use.

I'll have to look more into those, interesting to say the least, thanks for sharing the link.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2021, 07:12:57 am »
https://xeroshoes.com/shop/sandals/z-trail-men/

5.4 ounces for size 9. Also good for scuzzy shower use.

I'll have to look more into those, interesting to say the least, thanks for sharing the link.
Yep, they will be a good choice for many. There are also a number of other good choices on that site.  I actually like some of the others better, but there is probably something that suits a variety of folks needs.  I have the Genesis model and have been wearing them around the neighborhood for a while now and like them.  They are a bit less shoe with a thinner sole and roll up real small.  They are lighter and a bit cheaper at $39.99 and 4.6 ounces in size 9.

You can choose just how minimal you want to go, but you get out of your bike shoes in several of those models without carrying more than a few ounces and taking up very little baggage space.  Mine are very minimal and are good enough that you can hike in them over most terrain that I hike on tour.  I wouldn't choose them for peak bagging, but on the several mile hikes to see waterfalls and other attractions they will usually be great.

Offline froze

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #23 on: April 15, 2021, 09:15:50 pm »
I have to be careful not to get an overly flexy shoe because then my feet will ache walking too much in them, which is why I can no longer use tennis shoes for everyday shoe, I've gone to a hiking shoe instead.  But the shoe you talked about rolling up would be ok for just lounging around the campsite and not hiking in. Anyway, something I have to think about.

Offline jamawani

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #24 on: April 15, 2021, 11:15:11 pm »
Depends on what you want to do off the bike.
I've crossed the Grand Canyon a half dozen times -
Hiked the backcountry of Yosemite, Glacier, Banff, and Denali.
So I have moderate hikers.

Most folks probably don't hike the way I do.
YMMV.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #25 on: April 16, 2021, 09:48:19 am »
Nothing beats crocs for around the camp site - especially at my age when that 3:00 am nature call wakes you and you can step out of your tent and into your crocs. Light weight, water proof, work in the shower, good for brook crossings, can pedal in them in a pinch, and okay for around town. I have seen people hike 20 miles of the AT in them without complaint. Those are my second shoes for week long adventures. We are planning a TransAm and I am considering bringing another pair of shoes in addition to the crocs for zero days in town.
Long Distance Hiker - AT Thru-hike 2007
Long distance cyclist - multi day tours - TDF tour Alpes 2005
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966