Author Topic: Off the Bike Shoes  (Read 2114 times)

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Offline Saburo

Off the Bike Shoes
« on: November 11, 2020, 11:20:46 am »
Anyone out there have recommendations for off the bike shoes for touring?

I use SPD shoes to ride but like to change into different shoes for walking around camp or off days.  I don't really like the non-SPD shoes for riding so just wearing regular shoes for both riding and off the bike won't work.  Any thoughts on packable, comfortable off the bike shoes?

Offline John Nelson

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2020, 05:04:10 pm »
On long tours, I carry two pairs:
  • Normal cycling shoes with recessed cleats, which is okay for the walking you do during the day.
  • A pair of crocs for mornings and evenings. The main reason for crocs is they are lightweight and waterproof. But they are certainly less than ideal if you want to take a 10-mile hike, and they can be slippery in wet conditions.
On shorter tours, I have taken just one pair, which is a compromise. They are essentially running shoes with a recessed cleat: Pearl Izumi X-Road Fuel III.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2020, 08:41:32 am »
I ride in MTB shoes, so I can get off the bike for short periods during the day while remaining sure-footed.

When the day's ride is done, I'll put on some lightweight Teva sandals.  Shower in them, walk around town or camp in them, even do some short walks (up to a few miles, maybe).  Put on some heavy wool socks and they're good down to frosty (if it's not raining).

Offline hikerjer

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2020, 11:56:31 am »
I use Shimano double sided pedals and carry two pair of shoes. Bike shoes with cleats which clip into the pedals for the vast majority of the riding and a pair of Teva sandals for walking and for rides usually around campgrounds or towns. The Tevas work well walking around town and on short hikes and for short rides.  A bit of a hassle to change shoes sometimes but I do like the to be clipped in when I ride.  Seems to work OK.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2020, 05:51:46 pm by hikerjer »

Offline driftlessregion

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2020, 05:50:41 pm »
Crocs. Very light weight, good enough to walk, not hike, in. Ugly, but so what?

Offline hikerjer

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2020, 05:58:34 pm »
I understand the appeal of crocs and wear them around the house and yard a lot.  The problem with them though, is what you pointed out.  They are just not good for walking long distances especially on rough terrain.  I do usually take a pair when backkpacking as they make great camp shoes and work well for moderate stream crossings.

Offline canalligators

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2020, 06:43:35 pm »
Dissenting opinion.  In the interest of minimizing weight and bulk, I only take one pair of shoes, recessed cleat MTB shoes.  Good for cycling and walking.  Leaving them loose is comfy for use in camp.  Though I might take a pair of flexible boat shoes for swimming in rocky water.

Offline driftlessregion

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2020, 08:26:19 pm »
Well, that may be the difference: at 68 years old I don't do a lot of walking after getting into camp.

Offline canalligators

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2020, 05:43:58 pm »
Same age, same idea, but I occasionally need to walk somewhere for food, to see something interesting, or to wear on the train going to and fro.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2020, 08:55:30 pm »
For me it depends on the trip.
  • If I don't plan huge amounts of hiking I may sometimes take only my on bike SPD shoes.
  • If I want to do some light hiking or decide I want something to slip into in camp I might take crocs or flip flops
  • If there will be a lot of serious hiking I may take trail runners.  I have done this for just a one week section of a long tour, like while visiting the Yosemite Valley.

Offline cyclist alan

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2020, 11:55:42 pm »
I use Shimano Outdoor bike shoes. These are good for Performance Tour and last for a comfortable fit on and off the bike. You may check here:-https://bikesreviewed.com/gear/best-bike-shoes/

Offline hoverbird

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2020, 09:53:31 pm »
What about just regular running/tennis shoes? I rode a lot as a teenager with toe clips, then did not ride for like 30 years. Just getting back into riding, I naturally went with toe clips and have never used clipless pedals. I like the flexibility of micro-adjustments of foot position in my toe clips, and I don't think I am losing much power compared to clipless. My regular shoes are comfortable on and off the bike. I hope you don't think I am an abhorrent savage! :)

Offline staehpj1

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2020, 06:55:14 am »
What about just regular running/tennis shoes? I rode a lot as a teenager with toe clips, then did not ride for like 30 years. Just getting back into riding, I naturally went with toe clips and have never used clipless pedals. I like the flexibility of micro-adjustments of foot position in my toe clips, and I don't think I am losing much power compared to clipless. My regular shoes are comfortable on and off the bike. I hope you don't think I am an abhorrent savage! :)
If they work for you, great.  The advantage of having a comfortable off bike shoe on is a nice plus.

On the other hand, I don't think I'd ever go back to clips and straps.  I felt that I needed to yank the strap tight enough that they were hard to get out of before they did any good.  I was an early adopter of SPD in mountain biking when SPD was introduced and used Look pedals on my road bike in those days and I was delighted to be rid of clips and straps.  I had been toying with putting Looks on my MTB so I was delighted when the SPDs were released and managed to get an SPD setup shipped to me before they were available in my state.  People complained about forgetting to clip out, but I immediately found it easier than loosening tight straps and found loose straps useless.

I also felt like clipless made me automatically put my foot in the correct position (assuming I did a correct setup).   The 3 degrees of float was plenty.  Clips and straps only locked in your position when used with racing shoes that had a cleat with a groove that engaged the pedal cage.

BTW, some folks here like to use those half clips with no straps.  More power to them, but to me that is just a annoying appendage that adds no additional value.  Folks who use them and like them can and should continue to use them if they like them, but I don't get it.

Offline HobbesOnTour

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2020, 10:50:38 am »
What about just regular running/tennis shoes? I rode a lot as a teenager with toe clips, then did not ride for like 30 years. Just getting back into riding, I naturally went with toe clips and have never used clipless pedals. I like the flexibility of micro-adjustments of foot position in my toe clips, and I don't think I am losing much power compared to clipless. My regular shoes are comfortable on and off the bike. I hope you don't think I am an abhorrent savage! :)
Nope. You're not alone!  :D
I've toured all over Europe in sandals. In cooler weather I've a pair of very good merino socks.
There's something so juvenile and enjoyable about cycling through a puddle and feeling the water on my toes!
Relatively recently I added toeclips to my flat pedals, but that was because I found on damp, dewy mornings my feet would slip off. 

Offline janetanorth

Re: Off the Bike Shoes
« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2020, 01:38:33 am »
Bedrock sandals and a pair of split toe socks.