Author Topic: Obversations on traffic for the long-distance cyclotouriste.  (Read 782 times)

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Offline Westinghouse

Obversations on traffic for the long-distance cyclotouriste.
« on: November 15, 2020, 03:43:56 am »
Certain numerously repeated actions by drivers who were passing me caught my attention. It was always on two-lane roads that they happened. When drivers who passed me had a clear lane to pass they gave me nearly the entire lane when they went by. I thought they were incredibly courteous and thoughtful. However, when drivers did not have a clear passing lane they always squeezed in between the oncoming traffic and the cyclist.


Offline John Nettles

Re: Obversations on traffic for the long-distance cyclotouriste.
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2020, 11:52:48 am »
Haven't you learned that society is rapidly moving to an exclusive "It is all about me" viewpoint?  Too much of society thinks cyclists or for that matter slower cars, kids, runners, animals, etc., are just in my way so I have every right to keep going regardless if it is dangerous. This is mainly true in the USA.  Other countries MAY be a little more tolerant as more people bike or personally know someone who does so they are more careful.

I too have noticed an increase over the decades here in the US.  However, there are pockets of patience.  I distinctly remember leaving New Orleans (about 15 miles out) and we repeatedly had cars stay behind us unless it was way obvious they could pass.  We kept waving them around and they would just stay behind us until it was clear for about 1/4 mile ahead.  Nice but also sometimes too much of a good thing is bad as we kept having to concentrate on the cars instead of the scenery. The further we got away from New Orleans, the more "normal" it got.

Tailwinds, John

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Obversations on traffic for the long-distance cyclotouriste.
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2020, 02:05:39 pm »
Haven't you learned that society is rapidly moving to an exclusive "It is all about me" viewpoint?  Too much of society thinks cyclists or for that matter slower cars, kids, runners, animals, etc., are just in my way so I have every right to keep going regardless if it is dangerous. This is mainly true in the USA.  Other countries MAY be a little more tolerant as more people bike or personally know someone who does so they are more careful.

I too have noticed an increase over the decades here in the US.  However, there are pockets of patience.  I distinctly remember leaving New Orleans (about 15 miles out) and we repeatedly had cars stay behind us unless it was way obvious they could pass.  We kept waving them around and they would just stay behind us until it was clear for about 1/4 mile ahead.  Nice but also sometimes too much of a good thing is bad as we kept having to concentrate on the cars instead of the scenery. The further we got away from New Orleans, the more "normal" it got.

Tailwinds, John


Differences in attitudes in various countries became obvious to me in 1986. We had finished a bicycle tour of western Europe, and had flown back to Miami, Florida. From there we would cycle the 100 miles to Stuart. Within an hour on the road differences between Europe and the US were not very nice. It was a stark contrast. It made me aware. It was didactic, one lesson learned.

Cycling through the Big Sleazy, I became the invisible man. Drivers passed so close it was insane, I mean, within six inches. Later during that same ride to CA there was a news article about New Orleans on TV in a restaurant. I said they ought to flush that city into the gulf of Mexico. Some man asked me why I said that. I told him what had happened there. How can anyone drive that near to someone on a bicycle. And the one
act of consideration I noticed when passing with a clear lane on roadways was only when convenient for the drivers. When full lane passing was not convenient for them, they squeezed in between the cyclist and close oncoming traffic.   

Offline John Nettles

Re: Obversations on traffic for the long-distance cyclotouriste.
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2020, 02:50:56 pm »
Wow, we days of uber-patience and kindness.  Sorry to hear you had a bad experience.