Author Topic: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?  (Read 4449 times)

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Offline HikeBikeCook

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Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« on: December 12, 2020, 06:30:49 pm »
Quick poll to see how many people tour with kickstands?

If yes, one leg of two, center mount or rear stay?
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline John Nettles

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Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2020, 07:00:02 pm »
FYI, when you do a new post, you can do an actual poll.  The poll button is next to the "new Topic" button. 

While I like kickstands, I do not use them do to the weight.  If I used one again, I would only use a rear triangle kickstand.  I have tried most, and they all have pluses and minus. 

The regular by the bottom bracket pro is easy, familiar, and cheap. Con is it can mar the frame unless a dedicated kickstand plate is built-in.  Can't back-pedal if the stand is down.

A regular rear triangle stand's (mounts on the seat stay AND the chainstay) pro are it is very durable, can back pedal, but the front wheel can be squirrely at times.  A bit heavier and more costly though still relatively cheap.

A double stand by the bottom bracket's pros are the bike is stable but can't back pedal and are heavy and more expensive.

A Clik Stand (or similar versions) is lightweight but not near as steady and expensive.

I have not tried the front rack version nor the rear stand that mounts solely on the chainstay (that one scares me a little). I just lay my bike gently down if a wall, bench, or other bike is not available.  Since it sounds like you will be traveling with your wife, you should know that you can lean the bikes against each other (but front to back reversed) quite easily and I do it very often when touring with someone.  This is a bit harder if one bike is much smaller/bigger than the other.   In my 40+ years of touring I very rarely absolutely needed a kickstand though they are nice to have if you are willing to put up with the extra weight. 

 If I were doing a regularly loaded touring bike, I would use something like a Greenfield Rearmount Kickstand. If the bike was a very heavy loaded touring bike or a tandem, (50+ pounds of gear w/o consumables), I would probably use a double bottom bracket stand, ideally with a dedicated kickstand plate.

Tailwinds, John

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2020, 07:14:11 pm »
Surly only recently started supplying kickstand plates for the center mount by the bottom bracket. They void the frame warranty for kickstands anywhere else. My wife loves them, but we have had difficulty fitting them to her smaller frames and resorted to rear-stay kickstands. However, when they slip due to weight they wind up hitting her rear disc.

Also, with a heavy load, the ground often gives way on a gravel trail or the front wheel pivots and the bike is on the ground any way. I have rarely had bikes with kickstands in all my years of riding and usually look for a good leaning place.
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline John Nettles

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Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2020, 07:32:29 pm »
Also, with a heavy load, the ground often gives way on a gravel trail or the front wheel pivots and the bike is on the ground any way.
To help with this, take an old golf ball, drill a hole about 1/2 way through the ball a bit smaller than the diameter of the kickstand end.  Force the ball on the stand.  You can use caulking to also help "glue" the ball to the stand if the hole wears loose.  This reduces the chance the kickstand digs into the ground but does look a bit (lot) dorky. 

For the front wheel, get a brake band (velcro strap or heavy duty rubber band or similar strap that keeps the front brake lever closed pulled) or wrap a velcro strap or bungie cord around the front wheel and the downtube.  The latter is more secure but a bit more of a pain.

By the time my buddies who use a kickstand and wheel strap are done, I am usually almost done at the CS or ready to give the waitress my order.  ;)

Tailwinds, John

Offline John Nelson

Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2020, 11:51:10 pm »
I use a Click-Stand.

Offline hikerjer

Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2020, 12:04:08 am »
To elaborate on John's suggestion, I find these to work exremely well in securing my front brake lever in a lock/stop  positon to keep the bike from rolling when you lean it against something. Takes about 10-15 seconds to implement. You can usually buy individual ones in a outdoor shop that sells cross country skis.  I've never seen the need for a kick stand. Just extra weight IMO, but each to his own.


https://www.amazon.com/Multi-Purpose-Securing-Straps-downs-Fastening/dp/B015TXN4QO/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=Cross+Country+Ski+Straps&qid=1607835227&sr=8-9
« Last Edit: December 17, 2020, 09:23:34 pm by hikerjer »

Offline staehpj1

Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2020, 07:52:00 am »
Different strokes and all that, but, I prefer to do without one.  I find that walls, railings, guard rails and so on are more reliable.  Also I don't mind just laying the bike on it's side.

My friends who use kick stands all say their bikes never blow over in the wind.  I've seen all of them blow over in the wind. :)

If you ride paceline I'd suggest that the rear triangle ones may be an impaling hazard for the riders drafting you.  I know folks will say this is touring and the drafting thing is a moot point, but I can't imagine riding in a group and not taking advantage of drafting especially when there is a headwind.  I know the three of us drafted each other a lot if not most of the time on the Trans America.  Panniers may minimize the hazard, but I'd suggest considering it and at least seeing to it that the stand tucks in close to the stay.

Offline BikePacker

Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2020, 07:59:33 am »
.....one leg of two, center mount or rear stay?
On Tour - No.
Why no?
1. Center Single Leg - For me non-functional with fully loaded panniers - bikie falls down goes boom.
2. Double Leg Center Mount - I have & it is helpful, as long as solid ground surface;
however, so mighty, mighty, mighty heavy (and this from someone who packs with him the kitchen sink) that I made myself quit.
3. Rear Single Leg - For me non-functional with fully loaded panniers - bikie falls down goes boom.
Off Tour - Yes; always use a Center Single Leg.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2020, 08:03:56 am by BikePacker »

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2020, 08:09:10 am »
My wife drafts me often and hates being in front. The last time she was in front was just after a kid had taken her down on a bike path. I had her ride in front to check the trueness of her wheel. She said something I did not understand, so I gave a quick pedal stroke to catch up. I realized too late that she said "testing my brakes". We clipped tires and went down. She went head first into a split rail fence, having her helmet and riding glasses protect her head. Unfortunately the angle of the crash prevent her cleats from disengaging and she wound up with a broken ankle on the first ride of the season, 3/4 of a mile from road access. Usually the guy in the back gets it worse, but I only suffered a broken finger. She limped 1/2 way out while I returned to the car, racked my bike, and ran back to get her. We were able to get her back on the bike and I wheeled her out. Six weeks in an air cast, and a cancelled Erie Canal Trip (her first broken bone) is not something she is going to let me forget when I suggests she ride in from, even in heavy traffic.
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline driftlessregion

Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2020, 12:27:49 pm »
Kickstand on only 1 of my 5 bikes. It is on the one I pull trailer with granddaughter in. I've seen too many good frames ruined by over tightening the bolt on the chainstays. The touring bike can easily lay on the panniers.

Offline John Nelson

Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2020, 12:40:35 pm »
One of the reasons I appreciate a free-standing bike instead of laying it down or leaning it against something is that it’s much easier to unpack and pack the panniers on a free-standing bike.

Offline John Nettles

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Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2020, 01:44:35 pm »
I've seen too many good frames ruined by over tightening the bolt on the chainstays.
 

That is why I would only do a bottom bracket (center) kickstand if it had a dedicated kickstand mounting plate.  At least a kickstand like the Greenfield mentioned above spreads the weight/force onto two tubes.  I really wonder how many frames are dented as a result of the rear chainstay mounts what only use a 1" or so mount on the chainstay only.

Offline John Nettles

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Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #12 on: December 13, 2020, 01:46:19 pm »
... it’s much easier to unpack and pack the panniers on a free-standing bike.


Agreed.  There are times when a kickstand would have been nice. I should have included that in the pros above.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Kickstands - Love them or leave them?
« Reply #13 on: December 13, 2020, 02:13:17 pm »
I've seen too many good frames ruined by over tightening the bolt on the chainstays.
 

That is why I would only do a bottom bracket (center) kickstand if it had a dedicated kickstand mounting plate.  At least a kickstand like the Greenfield mentioned above spreads the weight/force onto two tubes.  I really wonder how many frames are dented as a result of the rear chainstay mounts what only use a 1" or so mount on the chainstay only.

Surly has quite a rant on the evils of kickstands.
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline driftlessregion