Author Topic: Newbie bicycle tourists, Don't get fooled.  (Read 4753 times)

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Offline Inge

Re: Newbie bicycle tourists, Don't get fooled.
« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2020, 02:42:16 am »
Quote
One comment on your OP, item #2.  Converting an MTB to a more tour-friendly rider position requires much more than just switching handlebars and cable lengths.  To fit drop bars to an MTB also requires new brake levers and shifters and probably a new stem.  Replacing the knobby tires with more roadworthy tires is also a highly recommended change.
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DaveB - you say that - to get a more friendly rider position you need to replace the bars for drop bars. I disagree with that. There are very comfy MTB bars that function very well for touring. Me for example have taken the reverse route and have gone back from dropbars (Salsa cowchipper) to a Jones h bar on my touring rig. Still use the cowchipper on my my gravel/ touring bike (M-Gineering) - now in use as indoorbike. On my Santos 3+ I have the Jones bar and they are equally as comfortable as the Salsa - just for use in different terrain.
In other words if you have a comfy mtb bar on the bike I do not see the need to swap - you can simple create some extra handpositions by using bar ends and/ or inner bar ends.

Offline BikePacker

Re: Newbie bicycle tourists, Don't get fooled.
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2020, 08:23:56 am »
I have two rigs I have used for touring ....
One is a previously owned 1991 Schwinn Moab hard tail / no front suspension All Terrain which I retooled to be a touring bike equivalent.  I had fun doing so and learned alot in the process.  Put many an enjoyable touring mile behind me on the machine.
After falling in love with touring via the aforementioned MTB,
I purchased a 'designed from gound up for touring' REI Novara Safari, 2001 brand spankin' new.  Great rig as well.
Love them both for touring. 
Coin toss as to which I head out on.
Why?
Cause both are rock solid reliable, fit my ergonomics, and fully touring functional.
Btw .... on Ortliebs -
for whatever it is worth, have never had mine leak or deteriorate. I wish I was as durable and fit for purpose : ).
Merry Christmas all - BikePacker.

Offline canalligators

Re: Newbie bicycle tourists, Don't get fooled.
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2020, 10:46:21 am »
I’ve been thinking more on this.

Reliability on a cheap bike is doable, but it requires more labor and systems won’t work as well.  They are harder to set up and don’t stay adjusted as well or for as long.  On the balance, I think you should at least get a low end bike from a real bike shop.  For one thing, it is more likely to fit well, because a shop employee will fit it to you.  (No guarantees, some people are better at this and some will sell you a misfit to make the sale.). But the main thing is, a shop Raleigh or Diamonback is a better bike.

Offline DaveB

Re: Newbie bicycle tourists, Don't get fooled.
« Reply #18 on: December 23, 2020, 10:38:39 am »
DaveB - you say that - to get a more friendly rider position you need to replace the bars for drop bars. I disagree with that. There are very comfy MTB bars that function very well for touring.
No, I didn't say that, the OP (Westinghouse) mentioned changing from flat bars to drop bars as a low cost way to make an MTB more suitable for  touring.   

I agree that many riders are fine with flat bars for road and touring use.  I'm not one of them having ridden a flat bar bike enough to realize I don't like them but many do.