Author Topic: Kickstand love it or leave it?  (Read 294 times)

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Offline MarkH

Kickstand love it or leave it?
« on: April 05, 2021, 10:16:21 am »
How helpful is a kickstand while touring?  I have a  have a Pletscher double leg kickstand on my bike and it works very well. Many times there is something to lean the bike against when stopped so I end up not using it as much as I thought. Looking to save weight and it is heavy (1.2 lbs). Any thoughts from experienced tourers? Was having a kickstand great or should I leave it at home? Going to do the TransAm route. Thanks.

Online staehpj1

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2021, 10:27:47 am »
How helpful is a kickstand while touring?  I have a  have a Pletscher double leg kickstand on my bike and it works very well. Many times there is something to lean the bike against when stopped so I end up not using it as much as I thought. Looking to save weight and it is heavy (1.2 lbs). Any thoughts from experienced tourers? Was having a kickstand great or should I leave it at home? Going to do the TransAm route. Thanks.
It is up to you whether it is worth it to you.  For me it is a firm no.  There is usually something to lean the bike against and when there isn't I have no qualms about laying it on it's side.

None of my bikes have stands except my folder which has been loaned out to others who like stands way more often than I ride it myself.  I'd take the stand off if I were the only one or even the primary one to ride it.  Heck, if I ever start riding it much I probably will take the stand off.

Offline John Nettles

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2021, 10:46:38 am »
One of my touring bikes has a stand.  The others do not.  I personally prefer the weight savings because as Pete said, I can usually find something to lean on and even if I don't I just lay the bike carefully down and it is fine. If I am touring with another person, we can always lean the bikes against each other (bikes lean against each other in opposite directions) and then they stay upright without a kickstand.

Tailwinds, John

Online staehpj1

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2021, 11:01:08 am »
If I am touring with another person, we can always lean the bikes against each other (bikes lean against each other in opposite directions) and then they stay upright without a kickstand.
Interesting.  That never occurred to me other than when touring with someone who was using a one wheeled trailer.  He jack knifed it and it stood up fine.  Then it was a nice leaning post.

Offline HobbesOnTour

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2021, 02:41:09 pm »
There's a school of thought that a kickstand can damage the frame, depending on the placement of it. The theory is that the chainstays are the weakest point - exacerbated, I presume on a loaded bike.

In practise, a kickstand is usually unnecessary for me - except for when its not.
Loading up after stealth camping or in some campgrounds can be very difficult without a stand.

I use a click stand (look online). Very light & strong, although made to measure for each bike. Not cheap, though. Can double up as a dog repellent or clothesline or a prop to keep a tent door open.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2021, 03:08:39 pm »
Has anyone used one of these? http://www.click-stand.com/ I saw one used in a CGOAB journal and have been thinking of trying one.
Long Distance Hiker - AT Thru-hike 2007
Long distance cyclist - multi day tours - TDF tour Alpes 2005
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2021, 03:23:33 pm »
Well, someone has to argue for kickstands, so I guess I'll do it.

A kickstand makes it much easier to attach two pairs of panniers, possibly with a bar bag, and then to bungee a tent or sleeping pad to the top of the rack.

With a kickstand, you may have to hold the bike up and let it "walk" itself into a stable direction on a slight slope or in wind.  You won't have to worry about the bike starting to roll if it's leaned against a pole or small tree and falling down, most of the time onto the derailer.  You won't have to experience the slow scrape of paint off the top tube as the loaded bike slides along a corner while falling over.

That said, I've only got a kickstand left on one bike.  It's a rear stay model (third one down the page at http://www.greenfieldny.com/chart_bicycle.htm ), and I replaced the foot with a drilled-out golf bar when the foot wore out. 

Offline Nyimbo

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2021, 04:50:49 pm »
    I would not argue that everyone should use one, but for me it is important.  Usually the first comment I read when this is discussed is, "There is usually something to lean the bike on and if not it is safe to lie the bike on its side."
But the most important reason for me to use a kickstand is in taking pictures with my bike in the photo.  I take lots of pictures so I will stop and take several of a scene with different angles and so on and I like to finish with one or two shots of the scene with my bike in it.  In these stops where I am stopping along the road I am riding on, there is usually not a place to lean the bike. Often there is a fence but it is likely 10-20 feet across the weeds or brush to the fence.  Taking a picture with my bike laying on its side on the ground is not a pleasing picture for me.  Looking for a branch to prop it up is a pain, so on my touring bike I use a kickstand. 
--Even for the rest of the day I find it convenient to use.

Offline wildtoad

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2021, 08:57:13 pm »
I have a double kick stand on the bike that I use around town for errands, groceries, etc.  It's fantastic but super heavy and I would never consider putting it on a touring bike. And I'm not a fan of traditional single kick stands for various reasons.

For touring, I use a Click Stand that I purchased for my then touring bike about 10 years ago.  It works great and is light as it's mostly just a folding tent pole.  It was made for the dimensions of the touring bike that I had back then, which has since been retired.  But the click stand works fine for my new touring bike, even though top tube height is not the same.  There is a margin of error.  Anyway, a quick check of the click-stand.com site indicates that they have a few more models nowadays to account for different frame types/materials and setups.  I generally run a mix of bikepacking gear and panniers, and have several places where I can store the folded click stand and access it quickly.  Note that for the system to work you must apply the included "bands" to both of your brake levers when the stand is in use!! If you forget that step, it won't end well. The bands store easily on your handlebars and stay there so easy peasy.

I do agree that in many situations you can lean a loaded bike up against something nearby and don't need a stand.  But in my experience, there is a significant minority of occasions where that's not the case, and the Click Stand is handy and totally worth it for those scenarios.

Offline wildtoad

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2021, 09:03:46 pm »
Forgot to mention, I have also used the same Click Stand on my road bike and hardtail mtb for van supported tours.  Again, it's super easy to carry depending on what kind of bags you have.  Frame dimensions are not the same as my touring bike, but it's close enough that the same stand works across different bikes.  So the value proposition is definitely there IMO.

Offline hikerjer

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2021, 11:23:58 pm »
I've really never seen the need for a kickstand. Just extra weight IMO. I can nearly always find something to lean my bike against. The only problem with that, as we all know, is the bike can tend to roll espcially when you can't keep the front wheel straight. I found the perfect solution for that problem with these: https://www.amazon.com/Multi-Purpose-Securing-Straps-downs-Fastening/dp/B015TXN4QO/ref=sr_1_23?dchild=1&keywords=Cross+Country+Ski+Straps&qid=1617679025&sr=8-23. You can easliy lock your front brake which makes the bike stationary. I just wrap one around my handelbars where it's easily available everytime I stop. In the rare cases that I can't find somewhere to lean my bike, I just lay it down. No harm in that.  I  find lots of other uses for the straps as well.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2021, 11:28:28 pm by hikerjer »

Offline Inge

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2021, 02:16:40 am »
I am also in favour of a kickstand on the bike (bike has a special attachment point for kickstands - at height of the rear axel) - no worries about tightening bolts to much and crushing the frame tubing.
Like having the kickstand so that i do not have to lay it down (pain in the....) imo to lift it back up or find something to lean against. Like being able to park it where and when I wnat.

Offline BikePacker

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2021, 08:09:17 am »
No kickstand (for reasons stated by others).

Offline jrswenberger

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2021, 11:01:51 pm »
Never had one, never missed it. It isn't about the weight, for me, it just isn't necessary. Leaning the bike or laying it down work well, gravity is always enough.

Jay
ACA Life Member 368

Offline driftlessregion

Re: Kickstand love it or leave it?
« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2021, 11:35:41 am »
The cool thing about panniers is that if the bike falls over or laid down intentionally, no damage to the bike!