Author Topic: Finding a Touring Bike 2021  (Read 6922 times)

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Offline Oz

Finding a Touring Bike 2021
« on: May 11, 2021, 11:25:52 pm »
I am in search of a bike for a few planned road tours.  After receiving notice of the Trek 520 not being available last year, I chose to hold off to wait for a bike to become available this year.  Now I am told that one a 520 will not be available until late 2022 or later...  Is anyone else having this experience with other "traditional" touring models (Kona Sutra, Disc Trucker...)?


Offline DaveB

Re: Finding a Touring Bike 2021
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2021, 09:59:04 am »
A Google search for "Surly Disc Trucker" showed it's available as a frame set in both 700c and 26" sizes from numerous sources in both the older (non-thru-axle) and current (thru-axle) format.  The current frame is only available in that rather garish "Pea Lime Soup" color so if you can get beyond the color, they are out there if you can build it up from the frame set.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Finding a Touring Bike 2021
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2021, 10:53:25 am »
If looking for a disk trucker I think you will find a very limited range of frame sizes in stock.  Last time I looked there were 42cm, 54cm, and 62 cm and nothing else without digging much deeper.  I am not saying you won't find anything else, but I suggest looking right away and if you find what you want not delaying buying it right away.

I think REI had some of their touring models in stock in a range of sizes when I last looked.

Also I kind of like the idea of touring on a gravel bike.  If that suits you they had some Cannondale alloy models (Topstone) in stock that looked suitable for light touring (it doesn't have any provision for front rack, but you could use a bar roll).
« Last Edit: May 12, 2021, 11:13:17 am by staehpj1 »

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Finding a Touring Bike 2021
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2021, 10:58:29 am »
check out pinkbike.com for used LHT's and touring bikes.
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline Oz

Re: Finding a Touring Bike 2021
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2021, 01:19:59 pm »
Thank you all for the advice.  I'll look into each of the suggested options.

Offline Nyimbo

Re: Finding a Touring Bike 2021
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2021, 02:26:35 pm »
I am in search of a bike for a few planned road tours.  After receiving notice of the Trek 520 not being available last year, I chose to hold off to wait for a bike to become available this year.  Now I am told that one a 520 will not be available until late 2022 or later...


I recently (4 months back) purchased a Trek 520. My local bike shop said it would be 9 months back order so I went to the Trek.com web page and clicked on my size and then put in my zip code and the told the search to show only stores with bike in stock. It showed me about 6 stores within 3 hours with stock.I just now did a test and input size 54 then added a zip code for Los Angles and the site gave me two stores with a 54cm 520 in stock in Southern CA.  So check it out for your size frame and your part of the country -if a 520 is what you want.  I also found my local REI had touring bikes in stock.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2021, 02:30:15 pm by Nyimbo »

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Finding a Touring Bike 2021
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2021, 09:10:42 am »
FWIW, if you can find a touring bike that's your size, try it and buy it ASAP.  For many years the big manufacturers have made a certain number of touring bikes, and they've often sold out about this time of year.  (Surly being the outlier, they often had LHTs available later in the year.)

Pete's suggestion of a gravel bike is a good one; just make sure the bike you get has attachment points for racks (assuming that's how you plan to carry your gear).

Offline Nicolassam

Re: Finding a Touring Bike 2021
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2024, 05:45:06 am »
If you're still searching for the perfect bike, you might want to check out the latest updates in the biking world. Regarding your question about availability, it's always a good idea to reach out to local bike shops or check online retailers to see if there have been any changes in stock since your last inquiry. Sometimes, availability can vary depending on your location and the specific model you're interested in. Also, check out Latest Bike News in India. Staying informed about the latest developments in the cycling world can help you make a more informed decision when choosing your next touring bike.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2024, 11:53:22 am by Nicolassam »

Offline davidbonn

Re: Finding a Touring Bike 2021
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2024, 10:31:18 am »
cyclingabout.com sells an annual buyers guide for about $25.  If you are in the market for a new touring bike that is probably a good investment.

https://www.cyclingabout.com/touring-bicycle-buyers-guide/

I'd say from a strategic standpoint the time to start shopping for a touring bike is in the fall.  You might catch a bargain on a model that is going to be updated for next year.  And if you want to custom-order something fancy you probably need to get that order in by October or November if you want to be riding it next spring.

Some stuff I'd look for in a touring bike (a lot of this is "well, duh!" to the many experienced riders here, but still...):

  • Stable and relaxed geometry for comfortable semi-upright riding over longer distances.
  • Really wide gear range (500%+) with the lowest gear having 20 gear-inches or less.
  • All the mount points for racks and fenders.  Bonus points for a third bottle cage mount under the down tube and three-bolt mounts on the front fork.
  • Thru-axles front and rear.  Some might debate this but for pete's sake it is 2024.

I'd also add that it is worth the investment in time and money to get a proper bike fit for a touring bike.  You are going to be spending a lot of time in the saddle and that is the best way to make sure that time is as comfortable as possible.

A pet peeve I have is that most bikes, and certainly most touring bikes, would do well to have oversized front brake rotors.  This can make a heck of a difference on a screaming fully-loaded descent from a mountain pass.  So if you can upgrade the front rotor to a reasonable size like 180mm when you build the bike you will be a happier cyclist on the Big Downhills.