Author Topic: Northern Tier and which stove  (Read 3042 times)

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Offline staehpj1

Re: Northern Tier and which stove
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2021, 09:01:48 am »
I used the MSR multi-fuel stoves for years and before that an old Primus "kerosene" stove, which I often burned Coleman fuel in. After the JetBoil and can't see myself ever wanting to go back to multi-fuel (or any non-canister) stove, unless I stated winter camping somewhere colder that the mountains of the Northeast.
I like my Pocket Rocket, but I only use it when I can either take all my fuel with me from the start or know where my fuel resupply is coming from.  I know folks say that canisters are ubiquitous, but I have been caught without too many times.  Maybe I am too gun shy, but...  On the TA we went a long ways without finding canisters, checking every big box store and sporting goods store we passed.  We ran out after Pueblo and next saw a canister in a freebee box in Pippa Passes Virginia.  There was one place midway that had it, but they were closed when we went through town.  Granted this was in 2007, but I have since had some difficulty for shorter distances with spotty availability, where I was unwilling to wait around for places to open or to go off route to find fuel.  I have never had issues finding alcohol for a pop can stove and would certainly never have a problem finding something to burn in a Whisperlite International (or my SVEA 123 especially if willing to burn gasoline in a pinch).

Offline misterflask

Re: Northern Tier and which stove
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2021, 01:44:29 pm »
Straying here-
<<charcoal lighter fluid was similar, but I have my doubts.  I think it is closer to kerosene>>
Oh gosh, this tickled some synapses.  We have a proton precession magnetometer at work for measuring the earth's magnetic field.  After flying somewhere with it, it has to be refilled with a liquid that has lots of hydrogen, either kerosene or lighter fluid.  So as far as that obscure application goes, they're similar.

Offline ray b

Re: Northern Tier and which stove
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2021, 10:08:00 pm »

I like my Pocket Rocket, but I only use it when I can either take all my fuel with me from the start or know where my fuel resupply is coming from.  I know folks say that canisters are ubiquitous, but I have been caught without too many times.   Granted this was in 2007...
I think you'll find the cannisters in more places now. I've been keeping an eye out. Most small towns that cater to hunters and sportsman will have a small supply.

And a Svea 123 - you're dating yourself. Be careful with that antique.  :D
“A good man always knows his limitations.”

Offline staehpj1

Re: Northern Tier and which stove
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2021, 06:31:05 am »

I like my Pocket Rocket, but I only use it when I can either take all my fuel with me from the start or know where my fuel resupply is coming from.  I know folks say that canisters are ubiquitous, but I have been caught without too many times.   Granted this was in 2007...
I think you'll find the cannisters in more places now. I've been keeping an eye out. Most small towns that cater to hunters and sportsman will have a small supply.
Probably true, but I have been bitten enough times that I am still gun shy.  In recent years it has only been a minor delay where there wasn't availability immediately or without going off route, but I have been burned in the times since I have been told that "every walmart has them" and they didn't.

Quote
And a Svea 123 - you're dating yourself. Be careful with that antique.  :D
They still sell make and them (or make and sell them again not sure which).  I consider it a reliable rock solid stove.  More trusted than my newer MSR stove.  No plastic parts.  No pump to fail.  Lights every time.  If I had to take a stove where my life absolutely depended on it working in any conditions, the 123 would be the one.

Offline misterflask

Re: Northern Tier and which stove
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2021, 07:24:14 am »
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If I had to take a stove where my life absolutely depended on it working in any conditions, the 123 would be the one

True enough.  I would have every expectation that my 1975 model would start right up.  Of course it's emblematic of what drove me to alcohol stoves: 1. noise, 2. odors from spilled fuel
It's so peaceful cooking over alcohol.  And any spilled fuel is not just odorless, but totally gone in a few minutes. Canister stoves rate a close second, I suppose: fairly quiet, spills aren't even a thing.


Offline staehpj1

Re: Northern Tier and which stove
« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2021, 08:12:00 am »
Quote
If I had to take a stove where my life absolutely depended on it working in any conditions, the 123 would be the one

True enough.  I would have every expectation that my 1975 model would start right up.  Of course it's emblematic of what drove me to alcohol stoves: 1. noise, 2. odors from spilled fuel
It's so peaceful cooking over alcohol.  And any spilled fuel is not just odorless, but totally gone in a few minutes. Canister stoves rate a close second, I suppose: fairly quiet, spills aren't even a thing.
I love my alcohol stove and use it when the weather is warm and I won't need to carry fuel for a long duration where the weight of the fuel becomes an issue (it never is on my tours so it is almost always what I use on tours).  I agree that the odor of spilled fuel is an issue, but that is somewhat mitigated by the fact that the 123 runs a fairly long time between fillings and as long as I don't resort to gasoline, the fuel isn't that obnoxious.  Different strokes I guess.  I know that a lot of folks hate the sound.

The noise...   I never really understood why that was a problem.  I always fount the sound of the SVEA123 to be a quiet sputtering that was charming and let me know it was doing what it was supposed to.  I find it comforting.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2021, 08:20:36 am by staehpj1 »