Author Topic: Laundry  (Read 1019 times)

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Offline Galloper

Laundry
« on: July 30, 2021, 01:52:19 pm »
In John Steinbeck's book, "Travels with Charlie" he mentions doing his laundry by using a bucket, fitted with a lid, which he part filled with water and detergent before putting in his laundry.   He kept this, tied down, in the back of his truck and the movement of the truck effectively served to wash his clothes.

It occurred to me that using a well sealed drybag, or similar, could achieve the same thing on a bike.   The disadvantage, of course, is the extra weight but has anyone tried something like this or got any suggestions for laundry on the go?

Offline staehpj1

Re: Laundry
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2021, 04:13:48 pm »
I did a variety of things.  Sometimes I used an actual washing machine at a campground, motel, or even at a coin operated laundromat.  Sometimes I just rinsed things out in a sink.  Sometimes I washed them in the shower while I was showering.  I have rarely tried using a jumbo ziplock bag.  I never felt like hauling along the weight to wash as I go.

Offline John Nettles

Re: Laundry
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2021, 05:33:03 pm »
I have read that some round the world travelers using Ortlieb (or similar) roll-top panniers just use a pannier as a "wash machine".  Some did it "deluxe" and used one for wash and another for rinse.  No extra weight and they typically are not in any rush whatsoever so they typically do laundry and the bag drys out overnight. 

I personally have not done it but if I was desperate enough, I probably would.

Tailwinds, John

Offline John Nelson

Re: Laundry
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2021, 10:50:49 pm »
Weight isn’t just a “disadvantage”. It’s a disqualification. Steinbeck did a lot of things that aren’t feasible for a cyclotourist. A sink works fine.

Offline donald.stewart.92

Re: Laundry
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2021, 10:59:31 pm »
I have used a dry bag when wild camping. Poured in water and a couple of drops of detergent. Rolled it around for an while. Not on the bike though. Too heavy.


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Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: Laundry
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2021, 09:51:30 am »
Hikers have also used zip lock bags, but the old stand by is to jump in a stream or lake as often as possible to keep the stench at bay. Today's synthetics dry quickly and I carry 1/2 a Walmart "car towel" for a pack towel which will suck the water out of anything quickly.
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline ray b

Re: Laundry
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2021, 09:01:07 pm »
agree with all the above.

washing on the back of a bike not only requires extra, undrinkable water weight, but also a full set of extra clothes.

Ironically, I'm on the GDMBR and just finished the weekly (or bi-weekly) thorough machine wash of my entire kit - minus my swim suit/board shorts/lightweight cargo shorts which saw the chlorinated pool, whirlpool and shower while all else was washing and drying.

Unless I'm in a dry camp or it's raining cats and dogs, like those above, I'm in a stream, lake, or shower with a bar of soap and the days riding clothes on for the first part of the clean-up. If some modesty is required, the board shorts work well and usually dry while finishing camp chores before bedtime.
“A good man always knows his limitations.”

Offline John Nettles

Re: Laundry
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2021, 10:22:01 pm »
Just to clarify, when washing using Ortliebs, I meant it was done in camp, not on the road while riding.

Offline George

Re: Laundry
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2021, 12:00:17 pm »

Offline jwrushman

Re: Laundry
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2021, 02:49:13 pm »
"The Scrubba - patented washboard-in-a-bag design"

They've gotta be kidding!  $55 for that?!

(George, I hope it's not your products.  If so, my apologies)

Offline George

Re: Laundry
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2021, 04:37:26 pm »
Hah. No. not my product. And, not needed if you have a sink/bucket.

Offline John Nettles

Re: Laundry
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2021, 07:37:01 pm »
While I personally would not use the Scrubba, I could see those that only carry one set of riding clothes and one set of camp clothes doing so.  It doubles as a dry bag (or maybe a pillow) so, depending on durability, it might take the place of an existing dry bag if you use one which can cost nearly as as much.
It does supposedly have 1300+ 5* reviews so it can't be all that bad.

Tailwinds, John

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Laundry
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2021, 01:27:40 pm »
I did a variety of things.  Sometimes I used an actual washing machine at a campground, motel, or even at a coin operated laundromat.  Sometimes I just rinsed things out in a sink.  Sometimes I washed them in the shower while I was showering.
^^^This^^^

Just did a three-day this passed weekend. 60 mile, very warm and very humid first day. Washed the riding clothes in the shower with some CampSuds.  Hung them up at my sight to dry.  Have employed the other methods listed above.

Offline peteranv

Re: Laundry
« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2021, 06:04:37 am »
If you're concerned about stench, it's worth picking up some merino wool shirts. I was skeptical about the claims that merino doesn't smell, but bought some in preparation for my GDMBR trip. I did some testing with them, wearing the same shirt for multiple consecutive training rides. So the shirt was literally completely soaked through with sweat during a 2+ hour summer ride, then simply hung up to dry. After six fully cycles of this, the shirt still did not smell. It was starting to feel a little grimy (nothing too terrible, though), so I finally threw it in the washer.

But that was enough to convert me. For my tour, I will be bringing only merino shirts—no synthetics or typical cycling jerseys. The prices can be a little discouraging, but by shopping the discount sites and buying prior year apparel, you can get them for less than the cost of a typical jersey.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Laundry
« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2021, 07:31:18 am »
If you're concerned about stench, it's worth picking up some merino wool shirts. I was skeptical about the claims that merino doesn't smell, but bought some in preparation for my GDMBR trip. I did some testing with them, wearing the same shirt for multiple consecutive training rides. So the shirt was literally completely soaked through with sweat during a 2+ hour summer ride, then simply hung up to dry. After six fully cycles of this, the shirt still did not smell. It was starting to feel a little grimy (nothing too terrible, though), so I finally threw it in the washer.

But that was enough to convert me. For my tour, I will be bringing only merino shirts—no synthetics or typical cycling jerseys. The prices can be a little discouraging, but by shopping the discount sites and buying prior year apparel, you can get them for less than the cost of a typical jersey.
Never worked for me.  I tried merino wool and didn't find the no stink claims worked out for me.  Maybe my body chemistry is weird or something.  I found that for me some synthetics are okay and some not.  I take the ones that work well for me.  They have the added advantage of drying fast, and not soaking up much water to start with.