Author Topic: coffee coffee  (Read 976 times)

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Offline Westinghouse

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2021, 03:30:18 am »
My bicycle tours were long and intense. For example, 54 days from southeast coastal Florida to San Diego, California, with only 44 days of actual cycling. The other ten were full rest days in motels. I got 35 miles on short days, and from 60 to 130 miles on good days, usually about 65. Mornings I was rootin tootin ready to go. There was little time for coffee. Coffee in restaurants, yes. Canned energy coffee in stores, yes. Starbucks only occasionally or hardly ever. There does not come to memory a tour where I carried and brewed coffee, myself. There is good hot coffee in McDonald's. What a variety of beverages there are that are called coffee. In one place they served ice coffee. They sweetened it. It was like pancake syrup sweet. It would spike blood sugar levels and jam the pancreas into discharge mode.

Some towns on the pacific coast bicycle route had coffee cafes. That is where you will find the richest, most delicious shot of caffeine. If you feed your addiction, do it right. East coastal Italy had fine coffee shops with the best cappuccino in the world. The coffee they brewed in Ukraine is a close second.

Offline ray b

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2021, 09:50:27 am »
Coffee? Who needs coffee??  ;)
A nice bottle of night-chilled water is the ticket.
Physiologically it's true. A few minutes on the bike gets the adrenaline levels up and coffee has little if any additional effect. On tours ,I drink the coffee more for ritual and taste.
“A good man always knows his limitations.”

Offline Galloper

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2021, 02:55:56 pm »
I recently bought a Hario 01 dripper.   It's small, lightweight and makes very good coffee.   The weight penalty is slightly increased by paper filters but well worth it.   No need for a carafe, it sits on top of a mug.   Well worth a look.

Offline OHRider

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2021, 12:01:12 pm »
My standard is two straws of Starbucks instant in a 12 oz mug every morning.  Seems to get me thru the day although if I stop at a restaurant I get coffee as well if it is in the morning.

Offline driftlessregion

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #19 on: November 21, 2021, 08:51:28 pm »
The Bodun 15 oz travel press plastic mug weighs only 9 oz. Makes good coffee especially for the light weight.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2021, 03:54:12 am »
The Bodun 15 oz travel press plastic mug weighs only 9 oz. Makes good coffee especially for the light weight.

It must be one hell of a device. I saw a man in a campground on the pacific coast route. He had a small espresso coffee brewer. He heated and drank at the table. Later I saw him in a coffee shop, and again in a food store, and again later on. He was cycling the coastal route. I love good rich delicious coffee. Though I would not carry a brewer, it is easy to understand why others would.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #21 on: November 22, 2021, 11:03:03 am »
The Bodun 15 oz travel press plastic mug weighs only 9 oz. Makes good coffee especially for the light weight.
And keeps it hot for a good while. I don't leave home without mine.

Offline PNWRider92

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #22 on: November 22, 2021, 02:39:42 pm »
I started off using the French press attachment to my JetBoil but it’s a mess to clean up, harder when dispersed camping without a water supply. I usually eat oats for breakfast while on tour, which means having to make one or the other first and not both at the same time. I settled with instant coffee packets. It’s not the best but with enough creamer it’s fine. I usually got for convenience over taste etc.

Occasionally I’ll stop by a restaurant or gas station and grab another cup of cheap coffee if my camp coffee didn’t suffice.
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Offline David W Pratt

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Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2021, 06:02:01 pm »
If you want to carry cream with you, Mr. Canalagator, get the little, single serving plastic cups some restaurants use.  Yo have to carry the empties, but those weigh very little.  They keep without refrigeration.  I drink my coffee back, but I've used the coffee creamers to enrich couscous.

Offline canalligators

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #24 on: November 26, 2021, 06:16:13 pm »
If you want to carry cream with you, Mr. Canalagator, get the little, single serving plastic cups some restaurants use.  Yo have to carry the empties, but those weigh very little.  They keep without refrigeration.  I drink my coffee back, but I've used the coffee creamers to enrich couscous.

Years ago I looked for them, and other single-serve items like mayo, with little success.  Few merchants carried these things, and those who did had them in far larger quantities than I cared to buy, e.g. boxes of a hundreds, or a thousand mayo packets.  On a quick look, it seems that situation hasn’t changed.  If I could buy twenty or thirty, I would go that route.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2021, 06:23:37 am »
Asking a server for a few extra creamers or mayo each time you do order out is a good way to build up a few days supply. At a gas station or C-Store that sells coffee and uses those creamers a few $$ tip to the attendant would probably get you a small bag full.
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