Author Topic: coffee coffee  (Read 4720 times)

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Offline staehpj1

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #45 on: December 22, 2021, 08:15:32 am »
Okay so I think I may have mentioned earlier that I was going to try Alpine Start instant after reading a very positive review.  I had bought some a while back and finally got around to trying it.  I bought the 8 pack of Original Blend medium roast and it works out to about a buck a cup.

It wasn't bad to my taste.  I found it hard to describe, the best description I came up with is "unremarkable" which actually isn't bad when it comes to instant coffe which I usually have at lesat some negative comment about.  I can't say I love it, but I don't dislike it.  One might say that for $1 a cup I ought to really like it and that may be true, but instant generally sucks.  If you want something that hits you over the head with flavor this isn't it, but it isn't terrible.

Compared to Starbucks Via I think maybe I like Alpine just a little better, but both are okay.  Via is more readily available and can be found cheaper though.  Both are 1000x better than the Nescafe packets that I tried a few years ago.  The Nescafe was cheaper, but sadly it wasn't fit to drink IMO.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #46 on: December 22, 2021, 09:26:55 am »
Compared to Starbucks Via I think maybe I like Alpine just a little better, but both are okay.  Via is more readily available and can be found cheaper though.  Both are 1000x better than the Nescafe packets that I tried a few years ago.  The Nescafe was cheaper, but sadly it wasn't fit to drink IMO.

I tried Via for a while before I got a portable French press.  Not for me.

Do you know if they still make those coffee "tea bags"?  We tried them back in '99 early on during our Northern Tier group tour.  You made coffee with them just as you would tea.  I think they were from Folgers.  They were awful.  I think we ended up tossing them because people would rather drink nothing than that stuff.

Offline staehpj1

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #47 on: December 22, 2021, 09:34:34 am »
Compared to Starbucks Via I think maybe I like Alpine just a little better, but both are okay.  Via is more readily available and can be found cheaper though.  Both are 1000x better than the Nescafe packets that I tried a few years ago.  The Nescafe was cheaper, but sadly it wasn't fit to drink IMO.

I tried Via for a while before I got a portable French press.  Not for me.
To be clear...  I am calibrating this as instant coffee and not really comparing to "real" coffee.  None of the instants are especially good as far as I know.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #48 on: December 22, 2021, 10:08:50 am »
I try to steer clear of both instant and Starbucks (Love dark roast but hate burnt beans). The combination of Starbucks and Instant would be a hard pass for me.
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline staehpj1

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #49 on: December 22, 2021, 10:21:11 am »
I try to steer clear of both instant and Starbucks (Love dark roast but hate burnt beans). The combination of Starbucks and Instant would be a hard pass for me.
I too hate burned beans and avoid Starbucks in general, but decent instant is so scarce to nonexistent that I am willing to drink Via at times despite hating Starbucks in general.

Offline ray b

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #50 on: December 22, 2021, 06:25:37 pm »
I try to steer clear of both instant and Starbucks (Love dark roast but hate burnt beans). The combination of Starbucks and Instant would be a hard pass for me.
I too hate burned beans and avoid Starbucks in general, but decent instant is so scarce to nonexistent that I am willing to drink Via at times despite hating Starbucks in general.
Ahhh. Charbucks. Fortunately, their stores are located in towns big enough to have a competing local roaster or coffee shop down the street.

I now note four pages of comments about "coffee coffee...." At this point in the thread, I'd ask why so much coffee on the trail? 

For me, the taste of a good French roast or espresso is like chocolate, and the routine of morning coffee makes me feel civilized.

That said, does it do anything for my mental alertness and physical capacity?

Well, not after 20 min on the bike. Once adrenaline levels are up, and muscles and joints are running on all cylinders, the caffeine adds nothing. Of course, if it's cold and one's going to sit around camp and has perhaps put off getting out of bed and breaking down the tent until after coffee, then I see the purpose of a little warmth and chemical stimulation. Although coffee and cycling just seem to go together - and especially at the shops where adrenaline junkies are forced to sit around wrenching for a living - the fact of the matter is that coffee doesn't add anything other than esthetic value to our ride. After 20 minutes on the bike, the daily dose of caffeine is meaningless. (No need to cite the studies on rectal caffeine and effects of coffee on fatty acid to carbohydrate metabolism in caffeine-naive subjects. In subjects regularly exposed to caffeine, there should be no significant difference in efficiency or performance while touring at 50-70% max for 5-6 h.)

Something a lot of us already understand - if we can throw the stuff on the bike and start riding, we feel pretty good after about 20 minutes. During the hot months, an hour ride before breakfast
with a good sunrise is a great chemical and esthetic substitute for coffee. We don't really need the caffeine and coffee itself provides no nutrition.

Now, if you want to know how I came to occasionally carry a camp espresso boiler, let's consider the esthetics of sunrise in a 4-foot deep winter mountaineering camp surrounded by snow ghosts, with a small white china cup of espresso steaming on an icy white shelf of snow.  That was worth the otherwise worthless weight of the coffee and aluminum espresso pot.

I like the discussion of coffee, but before mindlessly packing our usual, pre-office, morning routine onto our bikes, I encourage folks to think about why they do it and what they get out of a drink with no calories and less stimulation than riding. Most of us don't need it as much as we are led to believe.

'Nuf said. Time to finish my afternoon coffee and ride....
“A good man always knows his limitations.”

Offline froze

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #51 on: December 22, 2021, 07:28:16 pm »
I tried that method for cowboy coffee too, except for the eggshells because I know when I'm camping eggshells will not be around.  I watched a lot of videos on how to make cowboy coffee and this method you mention is the most common but they all tasted nasty.  Maybe it's just my taste preferences?
If you really must make coffee in camp why not drip or french press?

The GSI Outdoors Ultralight Java Drip is 11 grams, about $9 and doesn't require paper filters.  There are other similar choices from other brands.

There are a number of choices for french press.  Your cup/pot may have a press option available.  Something like the $$$ Snow Peak Titanium French Press is nice and makes good coffee.

If I were to take something I'd probably opt for the GSI drip one, but I haven't been making coffee on tour on most tours (bought coffee at a diner if available or did without).  Backpacking I used Via on my most recent trips.

I did mention in an earlier post that I ended up first trying an AeroPress but found it too bulky, so then I found the GSI Ultralight pour over and this is PERFECT, extremely lightweight and it takes hardly any space, and it makes a decent enough coffee for camping.  Its only drawback is due to it being so light I'm careful with the slide on fasteners that attach the legs to the cup, I'm afraid those could snap, but it's cheap so even if it broke it wouldn't be a big deal.  Oh, no paper filters are needed, you put the coffee grinds in, pour hot water slowly over the grinds, once all done just flip it inside out and shake the grinds out, then rinse with water.  I just put the grinds on the grass, it's good for the grass.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #52 on: December 22, 2021, 08:19:00 pm »
McDonald’s has some kind of coffee. Starbucks coffee tasted different from McDonald’s. The small coffee shops brew The best coffee. They brew up a mean cup of coffee in Ukraine. East coastal Italy had excellent coffee. I could not stop drinking it, and I rarely slept. As for myself, I am not what you would call a coffee drinker. I drink it occasionally I actually rarely and when I do I Keep it to the minimum.

Offline froze

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #53 on: December 22, 2021, 09:41:26 pm »
McDonald’s has some kind of coffee. Starbucks coffee tasted different from McDonald’s. The small coffee shops brew The best coffee. They brew up a mean cup of coffee in Ukraine. East coastal Italy had excellent coffee. I could not stop drinking it, and I rarely slept. As for myself, I am not what you would call a coffee drinker. I drink it occasionally I actually rarely and when I do I Keep it to the minimum.

When McDonalds first came out with coffee, and for about 10 years after that they had the most unique tasting coffee that got rave reviews with some people saying it was better than Starbucks, but then for some reason about 10 years ago they changed the coffee to a regular type of coffee.  McDonalds still makes espresso though, but you have to ask for it because it's not on the menu anymore.   The best espresso I ever had was at an Italian restaurant in San Francisco, I can't recall the name of the place, but the espresso was like having dessert.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #54 on: December 23, 2021, 05:03:08 pm »
It is a cold cold winter morning on the southern tier. You roll out of your tent. You pack, push the bike out to the road, and set out. You come to someplace that sells coffee. It could be a coffee shop, Denny’s, Burger King, Starbucks, McDonald’s, Or the local small town diner. That’s when coffee a hot cup of coffee really hits the spot. Generally speaking I am far from being a coffee hound. Some people revel And scarfing up coffee all day long.  That’s not me.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #55 on: December 27, 2021, 10:26:14 am »
I almost always limit my coffee intake to mornings, but that doesn't mean I want to wait until I am on the road, especially when it's cold.  My goal each morning is to at least start heating the water before I have to "hit the head."   ;D

Offline jamawani

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #56 on: December 27, 2021, 11:44:48 am »
Is coffee addictive ??  ;-)

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #57 on: December 27, 2021, 11:53:09 am »
Is coffee addictive ??  ;-)

I would say quite considering the 4 pages of discussion :)
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline canalligators

Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #58 on: December 27, 2021, 12:41:31 pm »
Is coffee addictive ??  ;-)

Yes, mild physical addiction, but withdrawal for most people causes little more than a headache and only lasts a day or so.  My problem is, I still work on a self-indulgence model. And being a diabetic, coffee gives me a self-indulgence that’s zero carb.  Now if I can get my digestion to tolerate more than one cup a day…

Coffee seems to work well for a lot of recovering alcoholics.  Lesser of two evils, for sure.

Caffeine is a trigger for many migraine sufferers.  Beware.

Offline HikeBikeCook

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Re: coffee coffee
« Reply #59 on: December 27, 2021, 01:04:32 pm »
Is coffee addictive ??  ;-)
Caffeine is a trigger for many migraine sufferers.  Beware.

Caffeine can also alleviate headaches and is used in medications like Excedrin. https://www.excedrin.com/dosage-ingredients-chart/excedrin-and-caffeine/
Also, the darker roasts typically have lower acid than the lighter roasts, so switching to a darker roast may help your stomach issues.
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966