Author Topic: Shorts, Liners, Tights  (Read 11477 times)

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Offline EGHama

Re: Shorts, Liners, Tights
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2022, 09:46:56 pm »
Thanks all, for the comments and advice.  Like all the other first timers, I am excitedly soaking it all up.  This site has been great for finding good info, proffered by actual bike riders and those who tour.  Hope to meet up with you old pros one day on the road.

Offline ray b

Re: Shorts, Liners, Tights
« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2022, 03:30:52 pm »
Hope to meet up with you old pros one day on the road.
Right - emphasis on the word, old.

Strikes me, the old part might make us a group selected for our ability to ride long distances with less "saddle" discomfort than others. Maybe, or maybe not, the best group to give advice.

One last image - most strong riders (think professionals) don't carry a lot of weight on the saddle. When cranking, I still feel the saddle is there more for balance and stability than a place to sit. (Those "cranking" moments become fewer and shorter with age)

Think of Cindy Whitehead-Buccowich winning the 1986, 50-mile, Sierra 7500 without a seat.

Although our efficiency goes down a little when we stand on the pedals, don't be afraid to get out of the saddle if your shorts (and chammy and saddle) don't feel right. I feel like I spend many of my second and third days on tour out of the saddle about 70% of the time.

“A good man always knows his limitations.”

Offline HikeBikeCook

  • World Traveler
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Re: Shorts, Liners, Tights
« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2022, 03:47:40 pm »
I have had days when touring on gravel that I have resorted to my 5 for 5 routines in the afternoons. Basically I either stand or dismount for 5 minutes every 5 miles or so to stretch and give the butt a break. Good to stretch the back and shoulders as well. On paved roads it is more like 2 for 10 or 15 miles :)
Surly Disc Trucker, Lightspeed Classic, Scott Scale, Klein Mantra Comp. First touring bike Peugeot U08 - 1966

Offline rayed

Re: Shorts, Liners, Tights
« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2023, 11:43:58 am »
What do you guys usually wear for colder morning rides?

Offline Alessa3322

Re: Shorts, Liners, Tights
« Reply #19 on: July 19, 2023, 11:45:17 am »
What do you guys usually wear for colder morning rides?
It depends on the temperature, of course.
15 degrees: shorts and a long-sleeve jersey or long-sleeve thin undershirt.
10 Degrees: tights or leg warmers; heavy long-sleeve jersey with sleeveless or short-sleeve wicking undershirt; or lightweight long-sleeve jersey with long-sleeve undershirt.
What about the places you usually buy clothes at? I looked through these Roamans reviews yesterday and liked several items. So, I'm open to new recommendations.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2023, 01:13:08 pm by Alessa3322 »

Offline ray b

Re: Shorts, Liners, Tights
« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2023, 09:07:40 pm »
What do you guys usually wear for colder morning rides?
I consider temperature, wind speed, wind direction, how I feel (my speed and how quickly I'll warm up). Depending on the wind and chance of rain or snow, I might replace an insulating layer with a windproof or waterproof shell.

I usually have an extra and usually lighter pair of gloves in a pocket.

Have to say, I have it down to a science and can usually hit the combination correctly. As the days warm up, layers come off, gloves change.

As always, if you're not sure, throw on the extra layer and have a place to stash it when you or the day warms up. Mentally keep track of the temperature (on your phone). Next time you see that temperature, it will likely trigger an image of what you're wearing.
“A good man always knows his limitations.”

Offline canalligators

Re: Shorts, Liners, Tights
« Reply #21 on: July 26, 2023, 08:07:12 pm »

For me I found bibs to be a solution looking for a problem to solve since shorts stayed up and were comfortable.  I figured bibs had a big advantage for really skinny guys (usually racers) who can't keep shorts up or guys with big guts. 


Bibs are also good for tall guys with a disproportionately long torso, whose lower back tends to hang out.