Author Topic: Raised stem  (Read 3984 times)

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Offline TwoWheeledExplorer

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Raised stem
« on: August 15, 2023, 09:56:07 pm »
About 15 years ago I had a Novara Safari trekking bike that I sold to make way for my Cogburn fat bike, but still dearly miss. Only recently have I given up looking for a replacement and decided to refurbish my 2006 Bianchi Volpe instead. One of the features I miss from the Safari was the raised handlebar stem, so I've put one on the Volpe. I like the more upright position. Any thoughts? (I also added a touch of my own! :
« Last Edit: August 16, 2023, 10:55:06 am by TwoWheeledExplorer »
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Offline misterflask

Re: Raised stem
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2023, 06:43:32 am »
That is a nice looking bike.  Love a Celeste Bianchi.  I think they tinker with the color a little over the years and that is a particularly attractive hue. 

I had an '88 Volpe that I raised the bars with a 1" Technomics quill (the good old simple days). 

I say had.  I cracked a rear dropout and after a complicated warranty negotiation ended up with a Reporto Corso cross frame.  I cracked another rear dropout (what can I say, I'm big and ride lots of miles) and replaced just the dropouts.  I describe it as a Volpe on its third frame and sixth set of wheels.

Are custom-badged top caps a thing now?  They should be.

Offline ray b

Re: Raised stem
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2023, 11:42:32 pm »
You might check out some of the comments about bike fitting in old threads, or just look one up and get a consultation. The right size stem is a changeable and therefore critical part of comfort and power.

Even with Phil Burt's book, Bike Fit on my phone, years of riding, and an old certification in sports medicine, I'm still playing around with handlebar and pedal reach as injuries modify allowable positions.

Of course, there's nothing wrong with owning a bunch of different-sized stems to find the one that works for you for the specific ride you want to do.

My last quill stem, purchase to raise the bars following a broken neck (chasing 9 y old mountain bikers down "collarbone alley" south of Gunnison..., yeah I know, don't say it) came from Velo Orange.
“A good man always knows his limitations.”

Offline mobilemail

Re: Raised stem
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2023, 04:51:23 pm »
I have a Nitto Technomic stem installed on my vintage Cannondale touring bike.  Several years ago I realized that my terrible post-ride headaches were from neck pinch, occurring when I tilt my head up to look under my visor and through my eyeglass lenses.  The stem solved the issue and I don't really care what others think about it.  That bike doesn't get ridden much now, anyway, since I primarily ride recumbents.

Offline ray b

Re: Raised stem
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2023, 09:37:14 pm »
I will note the engineering side of raising the stem - the Nitto's all appear to be 90 degrees or less. Getting the bars up requires more stem sticking out of the steerer.
If we go with a stem that tilts up, we can keep more of the stem in the steerer and will apply less torque when resting or pulling on the bars.

Here we see a 107 degree (+17 degree) Velo Orange quill for $56 (top) and a 72 degree Technomic for $62.

“A good man always knows his limitations.”

Offline misterflask

Re: Raised stem
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2023, 07:17:58 am »
Ahhh, neck pain.  I unfortunately know about that.  About a year ago, my neck pain was bad enough I thought I was going to have to give up cycling.  Acquiring a recumbent kept me on wheels, but physical therapy, bike fitting, and targeted workouts have me putting miles on the diamond-frame again and planning a tour.

Bike fit:  Fitter tinkered just a little and raised the stem a cm or two.
Physical therapy:  My therapist knows I'm compliant and generally responsive so he gave me a set of exercises to do at home.  Key to the whole thing is learning to bring your head back.
Workouts:  I have the good fortune to have picked up a trainer who is a cycle racer and has a master's in kinesthesiology.  She was happy to sink her teeth into the problem and provide exercises to augment the PT.

High on the list enabling the recovery were the Mckenzie books, recommended by another trainer:
https://www.amazon.com/Treat-Your-Own-Neck-803-5/dp/0987650416
https://www.amazon.com/Treat-Your-Back-Robin-McKenzie/dp/0987650408
Can't recommend these books enough.  They've changed the way I stand, walk, drive, sleep, and of course ride.  They're quick reads and maybe could have just been a long pamphlet, but hey, dude has to make a living.



Offline mobilemail

Re: Raised stem
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2023, 11:25:29 am »
I will note the engineering side of raising the stem - the Nitto's all appear to be 90 degrees or less. Getting the bars up requires more stem sticking out of the steerer.
If we go with a stem that tilts up, we can keep more of the stem in the steerer and will apply less torque when resting or pulling on the bars.

Here we see a 107 degree (+17 degree) Velo Orange quill for $56 (top) and a 72 degree Technomic for $62.

I agree RayB, a stem with rise is a better choice. I just went with the Nitto for the aesthetics, and I don't use added weight like aero bars or handlebar bag.

Offline TwoWheeledExplorer

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Re: Raised stem
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2023, 12:01:44 pm »

Are custom-badged top caps a thing now?  They should be.

I got it from KustomKaps (https://kustomventures.com/) Very reasonable cost and fast return.

Ride safe,
Hans-2WX
2WX: The Two-Wheeled Explorer
www.twowheeledexplorer.org
"St. Louis to the Western Sea if nothing prevents."--John Ordway, Corps of Discovery