Author Topic: Feedback on planned route (Oregon to Virginia) appreciated! WA/MT/ID especially  (Read 7484 times)

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Offline cosjp

Hi,

A few months ago I posted about my intent to do a West to East crossing starting in May. I've spent a lot of time researching and playing and I think I've gotten reasonably close to route that I'd love to toss it out there for feedback. A couple of quick notes before I share the link:

1) I know this doesn't necessarily follow all known or conventional routes. Parts of it mirror parts of the ACA routes, others steer away a bit either because I'm on a slightly different trajectory (for example Wisconsin there are certain planned visits I will make) or for safety reasons.

2) On safety: especially in Washington/Idaho/Montana where I'm hoping for the most feedback as I think they present the most risk, I've opted to stick closer to the interstates. I may even be on them at times but I'm largely hoping to use feeder roads or other roads close by. This is really so if I find myself in a bind I'm not terribly far away from support and was the recommendation from both WSDOT and MDT.

3) On support - this is a largely planned solo ride with the intent to end up in towns with motels/hotels. That is also part of the reason for some of the indirect routing and sticking closer to interstates as well. I know I could shorten the trip a bit but I'm ok with a little extra distance for convenience/safety.

4) The route is mostly for general planning - between segments (once I decide on those but they'll be on average every 70-100 miles) I'll break those down a bit more granularly. Should end up pretty close though.

5) A final note on advice of the last post I've made, I'm intentionally staying away from Yellowstone due to the earlier start. So that is why I've not included it in the route.

Any and all advice is appreciated! Like I mentioned above I think I'm mostly concerned about Washington/Idaho/Montana but I'm open to feedback in any state (except VA - I lived there most of my life so I have that one under control lol!)

Appreciate it very much!

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/42120608
« Last Edit: March 01, 2023, 04:10:25 pm by cosjp »

Offline jamawani

I don't know your touring experience level or what you will be riding.
Gravel bikes are pretty good - I've toured 30+ years on a mountain bike.
But touring on gravel can be anywhere from pleasant to grueling.
Plus, weather can change an unpaved road from nice to awful in short order.
(I use a 33% reduction in miles on gravel - i.e. 30 miles paved = 20 miles unpaved.)

You are leaving from the west coast pretty damn early.
You may be dealing with rain in the lower elevations and snow in the higher.
It's already been a doozy of a winter in much of the West - cold & wet.
Your crossing of the Rockies is pretty low - still facilities may open late this year.

OR 22 is very busy - esp. on weekends. Good shoulders, except a couple of narrow bridges.
Hwy 99W sux. Why downtown Portland? If no need then go via the Wheatland ferry and Oregon City.
The Historic Columbia River Highway east of Portland bike route is gorgeous. Some kick-ass climbs.
The most spectacular section is from Hood River to the Dalles.  SO WORTH IT.
But . . . The section between Cascade Locks and Hood River is still incomplete.
And you cannot ride a bike across the Hood River Bridge.

I've ridden WA 14 many times - in 1987 it wasn't too bad. Now???
Narrow, mostly no shoulders, fast & fairly heavy traffic.
East of The Dalles WA 14 isn't bad.
MP 273.3 to MP 287.5  ???  RideWithGPS is not always your friend.
Mostly unpaved - may not be public. Not terribly scenic either.
Why not stay on WA 14 to Plymouth and north on Plymouth Rd?

Is Spokane a must?
There are much better ways to bike thru the Palouse Hills.
Spring is gorgeous - although you may be a bit early.
(I think your start date is definitely a week too soon, probably 2 weeks.)
Heading out of the Tri Cities, the Columbia Plateau Trail is brutal - chunky clinker rock.
Pasco-Kahlotus Road has very little traffic - desert scenery, then you can cut dwon to Winddust.
MP 365 to MP 385 is a WRF section - RWGPS imagination - rough dirt/gravel.
When nearby paved roads are almost traffic free and sweet riding.

I'll stop before getting to Idaho.
If Spokane is not a must, then you can cur over to Plummer and the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes.

Jama

Pic - Palouse in early June







Offline cosjp

I don't know your touring experience level or what you will be riding.
Gravel bikes are pretty good - I've toured 30+ years on a mountain bike.
But touring on gravel can be anywhere from pleasant to grueling.
Plus, weather can change an unpaved road from nice to awful in short order.
(I use a 33% reduction in miles on gravel - i.e. 30 miles paved = 20 miles unpaved.)

You are leaving from the west coast pretty damn early.
You may be dealing with rain in the lower elevations and snow in the higher.
It's already been a doozy of a winter in much of the West - cold & wet.
Your crossing of the Rockies is pretty low - still facilities may open late this year.

OR 22 is very busy - esp. on weekends. Good shoulders, except a couple of narrow bridges.
Hwy 99W sux. Why downtown Portland? If no need then go via the Wheatland ferry and Oregon City.
The Historic Columbia River Highway east of Portland bike route is gorgeous. Some kick-ass climbs.
The most spectacular section is from Hood River to the Dalles.  SO WORTH IT.
But . . . The section between Cascade Locks and Hood River is still incomplete.
And you cannot ride a bike across the Hood River Bridge.

I've ridden WA 14 many times - in 1987 it wasn't too bad. Now???
Narrow, mostly no shoulders, fast & fairly heavy traffic.
East of The Dalles WA 14 isn't bad.
MP 273.3 to MP 287.5  ???  RideWithGPS is not always your friend.
Mostly unpaved - may not be public. Not terribly scenic either.
Why not stay on WA 14 to Plymouth and north on Plymouth Rd?

Is Spokane a must?
There are much better ways to bike thru the Palouse Hills.
Spring is gorgeous - although you may be a bit early.
(I think your start date is definitely a week too soon, probably 2 weeks.)
Heading out of the Tri Cities, the Columbia Plateau Trail is brutal - chunky clinker rock.
Pasco-Kahlotus Road has very little traffic - desert scenery, then you can cut dwon to Winddust.
MP 365 to MP 385 is a WRF section - RWGPS imagination - rough dirt/gravel.
When nearby paved roads are almost traffic free and sweet riding.

I'll stop before getting to Idaho.
If Spokane is not a must, then you can cur over to Plummer and the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes.

Jama

Pic - Palouse in early June

Hi Jama,

First and foremost: sincerely appreciate your feedback! This is exactly what I'm hoping to hear - acknowledging RWGPS and other mapping tools don't always have the full picture.

Fail on my part not to mention equipment. I will be taking a gravel bike across - a Felt Broam 30. My background is a bit unique. I don't have nearly your experience on a bike. I do however have a background of let's call it 15ish years of extreme adventure running (for example 7 Marathons on 7 Continents in 7 Days), with a comfortable amount of saddle time and several centuries both unsupported and supported like the Triple Bypass, Pikes Peak and Mt Evans summits. I feel confident I can handle the discomfort and challenges of the ride itself - fully expecting things are going against me at some point. I live in Colorado Springs so I've definitely experienced how unusual this Winter has been! I know it's early and that comes with risks. If I have to wait things out somewhere because of that I'm fully prepared to. But I'd almost rather get on the road sooner and take that chance due to some life constraints. A calculated risk if you will. My hope is this will lead to better experiences the further east I go - avoiding extreme heat.

Now more specifically: I adjusted the Portland section based on your feedback. No need to go through Portland! That is purely how it took me. I am not quite sure what to do (if anything) about the section of 14 after Cascade Locks you refer to which I assume is why it's taking me over Hood into Washington. I know I can't cross the HRB which sucks but I figure I can stop at the Dallas overnight. I adjusted the 14 section to go north on Plymouth - I'm guessing it was just trying to keep me near 82. Adjusted to take Pasco-Kahlotus Road. I take it you're suggesting 260 versus the CPT at what is now roughly MM 360-368? Spokane is not a must! The bigger deal is going through the Couer d'alene area so I can stick around that route down to Missoula.

Again, many thanks! The same link should reflect the changes you recommended?
« Last Edit: March 01, 2023, 11:24:30 pm by cosjp »

Offline John Nettles

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Jama offers good advice.  However, I will differ from him in that I personally enjoyed the section between Spokane (actually Cheney) and Coeur d'Alene.  I would suggest that if time permits to do both the Palouse region (as it is really wonderful on) on your way to Spokane.

I would also strongly encourage you to ride the Route of the Hiwatha (assuming it is open as you really are taking off early in the season) followed by a ride along the St. Joe River.  See this similar Forum thread for the route I rode and enjoyed very much.  It is similar to your route between Spokane and Missoula but differs substantially between Missoula and Butte.  https://forums.adventurecycling.org/index.php?topic=17591.0 

Also, I personally would stick with the GAP between Pittsburgh and Cumberland. 

Otherwise the route look good overall after factoring in what Jama has indicated.

Tailwinds, John

Offline jamawani

Hood River to The Dalles
Seriously, it is some of the sweetest cycling out there.
It's worth begging, borrowing, or stealing your way across the HRB. Uber?
Also, there are lots of eclectic brew pubs and WarmShowers people in Hood River.
Didn't you mention brew pubs?? Hood River is a Mecca.
Of course, don't get too sloshed or you won't appreciate the ride the next day.

Offline jamawani

PS -
You may want to segment your route on RWGPS.
I have found that anything over 400-500 can lock up, esp. on mobile devices.
There are a number of ways to do this - but make sure to save your master copy.

Offline cosjp

Jama offers good advice.  However, I will differ from him in that I personally enjoyed the section between Spokane (actually Cheney) and Coeur d'Alene.  I would suggest that if time permits to do both the Palouse region (as it is really wonderful on) on your way to Spokane.

I would also strongly encourage you to ride the Route of the Hiwatha (assuming it is open as you really are taking off early in the season) followed by a ride along the St. Joe River.  See this similar Forum thread for the route I rode and enjoyed very much.  It is similar to your route between Spokane and Missoula but differs substantially between Missoula and Butte.  https://forums.adventurecycling.org/index.php?topic=17591.0 

Also, I personally would stick with the GAP between Pittsburgh and Cumberland. 

Otherwise the route look good overall after factoring in what Jama has indicated.

Tailwinds, John


Thank you for your feedback John! I know you had the same reservation on my last post about the timing of the trip. If I can make it a bit later I will. I know you said even a week or two may help. It's just one of those things I may have one opportunity and if I don't take it, it might not come again for a while. Hiwatha looks amazing! Based on their website I may arrive too early but I'm going to keep this one asterisk. I will also have a closer look at PA. I actually didn't notice the GAP until just a few days ago and totally forgot about re-routing that section. Thank you for the feedback and the review! Let me know if you think of anything else.

Hood River to The Dalles
Seriously, it is some of the sweetest cycling out there.
It's worth begging, borrowing, or stealing your way across the HRB. Uber?
Also, there are lots of eclectic brew pubs and WarmShowers people in Hood River.
Didn't you mention brew pubs?? Hood River is a Mecca.
Of course, don't get too sloshed or you won't appreciate the ride the next day.

Hah! Well ok then - I will see what I can do to make that section happen! It does look amazing and I had already planned to stop at the Dallas anyhow so that would work out way better! It looks like if push came to shove I could ride 84 a bit where there is no other option to avoid HRB and stay on the Oregon side. Thoughts there? I do love a good brewery and that is a big part of this trip! "Too sloshed" of course will probably be relative lol.

PS -
You may want to segment your route on RWGPS.
I have found that anything over 400-500 can lock up, esp. on mobile devices.
There are a number of ways to do this - but make sure to save your master copy.

Ya I've definitely noticed. Oddly - pulling it up on the web seems way better than using the app. In the end I'm really going to be looking at each segment between hotels so that is probably how I'll break it down once I finalize the route (which honestly sounds like I'm close to!)

Thank you all again! Cannot tell you how much I appreciate it.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

A couple of initial things…

1. The transition from the NorPac to Olympian trails is not as you’ve mapped it. About a mile or so west of the Saltese Trestle is the connector “path.” I see it’s now shown on the map. Used to be you could only see it using the satellite view.

2. The NorPac Trail east from Lookout Pass can be rough down to Taft. I had to skateboard and walk a few short sections climbing it in 2019.

3. Notice that there are a couple of sections of the Olympian Trail are walled off from “civilization” by the river. If you find the unpaved surface not to your liking, you can’t simply hop off.

4. I’m virtually certain that route you use east of Tarkio, MT, is part of the former Milwaukee Road right of way beyond the Tarkio Fishing Access Site and is a private road. The interstate is the option. Interchange 61 to 66.

5. When I tried to ride that unpaved section between Mead Ln. and Alberton, MT (in the opposite direction), I encountered an impenetrable fence. (The eastern portio was a trail.) That was in 2017. Maybe things have changed.

6. Why go way out of the way at Ninemile? Take the interstate. It’s a short segment and not bad.

7. For a cool, retro experience, book a room in the motor lodge portion of the Hotel Finlen in the historic section of town. Then walk here for a dinner treat:

http://casagrandassteakhouse.com/

That’s all for now.

« Last Edit: March 02, 2023, 11:24:27 pm by BikeliciousBabe »

Offline cosjp

A couple of initial things…

1. The transition from the NorPac to Olympian trails is not as you’ve mapped it. About a mile or so west of the Saltese Trestle is the connector “path.” I see it’s now shown on the map. Used to be you could only see it using the satellite view.

2. The NorPac Trail east from Lookout Pass can be rough down to Taft. I had to skateboard and walk a few short sections climbing it in 2019.

3. Notice that there are a couple of sections of the Olympian Trail are walled off from “civilization” by the river. If you find the unpaved surface not to your liking, you can’t simply hop off.

4. I’m virtually certain that route you use east of Tarkio, MT, is part of the former Milwaukee Road right of way beyond the Tarkio Fishing Access Site and is a private road. The interstate is the option. Interchange 61 to 66.

5. When I tried to ride that unpaved section between Mead Ln. and Alberton, MT (in the opposite direction), I encountered an impenetrable fence. (The eastern portio was a trail.) That was in 2017. Maybe things have changed.

6. Why go way out of the way at Ninemile? Take the interstate. It’s a short segment and not bad.

7. For a cool, retro experience, book a room in the motor lodge portion of the Hotel Finlen in the historic section of town. Then walk here for a dinner treat:

http://casagrandassteakhouse.com/

That’s all for now.

Good morning and thank you for the feedback! So with respect to Montana - 100% of what you see is pretty much the product of Google/RWGPS routing. Frankly, I have no idea what is right or wrong so I know you made a lot of suggestions above which I'll review carefully, but if you have any others I'm open ears! I know there are some restricted sections and unpaved sections that I'm probably going to end up riding the interstate instead and that is ok with me. That is pretty much what MDT told me I should do anyhow. That section between Missoula and Butte it was trying to take me all kinds of funky ways so frankly I could use some help there. My biggest concern is through there it can get a bit sparse so I want to make sure I'm still near some hotel options / can get help if I break down or something. As much as reasonably possible anyhow.

And thank you for the hotel and restaurant recommendation that is FANTASTIC! Love that!

Offline BikeliciousBabe

If you want an interesting way to get from Missoula to Butte, you can take the paved bike path to Hamilton, where there are places to stay. (The City Center Motel is a more affordable option and within walking distance of the commercial area.) From Hamilton, take MT 38 up to to Skalkaho Pass. The road becomes unpaved after a while, but there is a neat waterfall. The descent is mostly unpaved, but it’s not very steep. Mt 38 ends at MT 1, which will take you up to Georgetown Lake then down to Anaconda. From there, there are a couple of ways to get to Butte.  I’ll try to make a map of the route I’ve used that uses some trail mileage into town.

Offline jamawani

Are you planning 100 mi. per day - 30 days for the trip?
Will you be doing any camping or all motel / warmshowers?

You need to be real careful about any off-pavement in the West.
Esp. anything at higher elevation. It will just be too early.
I've had snow drifts, bridges out, and major muck
on forest roads in mid June - - let alone mid May.
It's usually doable - but you may get 20 miles in.
Plus you bike, panniers, chain, and rings will be covered in mud.
I'd keep the unpaved segments to lower elevation.

Idaho -
The Route of the Hiawathas is spectacular, but the tunnel doesn't open until May 26.
The Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes is paved and has some remote sections well away from roads.
The section east of Enaville runs right next to I-90 and is kinda meh.
I have always preferred to use Thompson Pass to Thompson Falls -
(then Hwy 200 to Missoula. Frequent lodging / restaurant options.)
Old River Road runs along the north side of the Coeur d'Alene River.
Rough pavement, some dirt, very little traffic.
Food/lodging in the old mining town of Murray.

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/27589247

Montana -
Please don't do Potomac to Bearmouth via Garnet ghost town.
This year it won't be bikeable until mid June. Or later.
https://www.blm.gov/visit/garnet-recreation-management-area
Skalkaho Pass is also likely to be very iffy in mid May.

https://www.bigskyfishing.com/scenic-drives/skalkaho-highway.php#:~:text=Highway%20usually%20fully%20opens%20sometime,road%20is%20used%20for%20snowmobiling.

If you want to do some unpaved - I would rec Rock Creek Road - lower elevation.
From I-90 east of Missoula to Hwy 1 south of Phillipsburg. Hwy 1 is sweet.
All pavement from Missoula - Hwy 200 to Hwy 141 to Hwy 271 to Drummond.
Than Hwy 1 to Anaconda. Back roads with some dirt to aboid I-90 into Butte.
Butte is the most amazing city in the West. Seen better days, but - -
Some awesome pubs in Uptown - sadly the M&M burned a few years ago.
There's a temporary M&M until the old one is rebuilt.
Be careful, Butte is not for Sunday School teachers - esp. late at night.

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/27592371

Pic - M&M Club 1939-1940
« Last Edit: March 03, 2023, 07:51:07 pm by jamawani »

Offline BikeliciousBabe

I agree about Rock Creek Rd. I’ve ridden it from P’burg to I-90 twice.

Your route from Anaconda to Butte looks good, but if you come in on MT 1, I would make a right on Crackerville then hook up with what you have mapped. And if you plan to stay in the historic area, get off the trail in Rocker and get on the B&P Trail. Once you get up the hill you can make your way to somewhere like the Hotel Finlen.

Offline cosjp

Are you planning 100 mi. per day - 30 days for the trip?
Will you be doing any camping or all motel / warmshowers?

You need to be real careful about any off-pavement in the West.
Esp. anything at higher elevation. It will just be too early.
I've had snow drifts, bridges out, and major muck
on forest roads in mid June - - let alone mid May.
It's usually doable - but you may get 20 miles in.
Plus you bike, panniers, chain, and rings will be covered in mud.
I'd keep the unpaved segments to lower elevation.

Idaho -
The Route of the Hiawathas is spectacular, but the tunnel doesn't open until May 26.
The Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes is paved and has some remote sections well away from roads.
The section east of Enaville runs right next to I-90 and is kinda meh.
I have always preferred to use Thompson Pass to Thompson Falls -
(then Hwy 200 to Missoula. Frequent lodging / restaurant options.)
Old River Road runs along the north side of the Coeur d'Alene River.
Rough pavement, some dirt, very little traffic.
Food/lodging in the old mining town of Murray.

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/27589247

Montana -
Please don't do Potomac to Bearmouth via Garnet ghost town.
This year it won't be bikeable until mid June. Or later.
https://www.blm.gov/visit/garnet-recreation-management-area
Skalkaho Pass is also likely to be very iffy in mid May.

https://www.bigskyfishing.com/scenic-drives/skalkaho-highway.php#:~:text=Highway%20usually%20fully%20opens%20sometime,road%20is%20used%20for%20snowmobiling.

If you want to do some unpaved - I would rec Rock Creek Road - lower elevation.
From I-90 east of Missoula to Hwy 1 south of Phillipsburg. Hwy 1 is sweet.
All pavement from Missoula - Hwy 200 to Hwy 141 to Hwy 271 to Drummond.
Than Hwy 1 to Anaconda. Back roads with some dirt to aboid I-90 into Butte.
Butte is the most amazing city in the West. Seen better days, but - -
Some awesome pubs in Uptown - sadly the M&M burned a few years ago.
There's a temporary M&M until the old one is rebuilt.
Be careful, Butte is not for Sunday School teachers - esp. late at night.

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/27592371

Pic - M&M Club 1939-1940

Morning - apologies for this delayed reply! I've been helping with setup / running a Marathon the past 5 days so life has been a little chaotic!

I am planning around 80-90 miles average - knowing some days will be longer, some shorter, etc. As for unpaved: I feel no need to do unpaved riding. As much as I can do on pavement is my preference. I am not planning to camp so my goal is to hit motels/hotels. Honestly I hadn't even considered warmshowers until you mentioned it! I will review some of your other feedback a little more carefully when I get back home tomorrow. If you have any suggestions based on this feedback please let me know! Like I said - that whole section between Spokane/Glendive is really all totally unfamiliar territory and I'm trying to do whatever I can to maximize my chances of getting across safely. If that means some less pretty sections, so be it. I can always come back. The way I figure it: it's this section that is most likely to make or break this trip. Once I'm through this I think it should be smoother sailing.

Thank you again!

Offline cosjp

A couple of initial things…

1. The transition from the NorPac to Olympian trails is not as you’ve mapped it. About a mile or so west of the Saltese Trestle is the connector “path.” I see it’s now shown on the map. Used to be you could only see it using the satellite view.

2. The NorPac Trail east from Lookout Pass can be rough down to Taft. I had to skateboard and walk a few short sections climbing it in 2019.

3. Notice that there are a couple of sections of the Olympian Trail are walled off from “civilization” by the river. If you find the unpaved surface not to your liking, you can’t simply hop off.

4. I’m virtually certain that route you use east of Tarkio, MT, is part of the former Milwaukee Road right of way beyond the Tarkio Fishing Access Site and is a private road. The interstate is the option. Interchange 61 to 66.

5. When I tried to ride that unpaved section between Mead Ln. and Alberton, MT (in the opposite direction), I encountered an impenetrable fence. (The eastern portio was a trail.) That was in 2017. Maybe things have changed.

6. Why go way out of the way at Ninemile? Take the interstate. It’s a short segment and not bad.

7. For a cool, retro experience, book a room in the motor lodge portion of the Hotel Finlen in the historic section of town. Then walk here for a dinner treat:

http://casagrandassteakhouse.com/

That’s all for now.

Hi again,

Finally had a chance to look at this a little closer. I fixed the transition between North Pacific and Olympian so thanks for that! I see there is about a 10 mile section of off-road you're mainly talking about around Lookout Pass down to Taft. I'm not seeing any alternative though to this so I am guessing this is just a section I'm going to have to pretty much suck up anyway. Is my assessment right there? What's the biggest issue with it? Is it bad enough I need to think about interstate travel to avoid that section?

On the Tarkio to Alberton section: I think that was one of the sections I knew I'd probably need to be on the interstate. RWGPS won't let me map to the interstate though. Honestly my guess is I'm going to end up riding quite a bit of interstate in Montana.

Thanks!


Offline cosjp

Are you planning 100 mi. per day - 30 days for the trip?
Will you be doing any camping or all motel / warmshowers?

You need to be real careful about any off-pavement in the West.
Esp. anything at higher elevation. It will just be too early.
I've had snow drifts, bridges out, and major muck
on forest roads in mid June - - let alone mid May.
It's usually doable - but you may get 20 miles in.
Plus you bike, panniers, chain, and rings will be covered in mud.
I'd keep the unpaved segments to lower elevation.

Idaho -
The Route of the Hiawathas is spectacular, but the tunnel doesn't open until May 26.
The Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes is paved and has some remote sections well away from roads.
The section east of Enaville runs right next to I-90 and is kinda meh.
I have always preferred to use Thompson Pass to Thompson Falls -
(then Hwy 200 to Missoula. Frequent lodging / restaurant options.)
Old River Road runs along the north side of the Coeur d'Alene River.
Rough pavement, some dirt, very little traffic.
Food/lodging in the old mining town of Murray.

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/27589247

Montana -
Please don't do Potomac to Bearmouth via Garnet ghost town.
This year it won't be bikeable until mid June. Or later.
https://www.blm.gov/visit/garnet-recreation-management-area
Skalkaho Pass is also likely to be very iffy in mid May.

https://www.bigskyfishing.com/scenic-drives/skalkaho-highway.php#:~:text=Highway%20usually%20fully%20opens%20sometime,road%20is%20used%20for%20snowmobiling.

If you want to do some unpaved - I would rec Rock Creek Road - lower elevation.
From I-90 east of Missoula to Hwy 1 south of Phillipsburg. Hwy 1 is sweet.
All pavement from Missoula - Hwy 200 to Hwy 141 to Hwy 271 to Drummond.
Than Hwy 1 to Anaconda. Back roads with some dirt to aboid I-90 into Butte.
Butte is the most amazing city in the West. Seen better days, but - -
Some awesome pubs in Uptown - sadly the M&M burned a few years ago.
There's a temporary M&M until the old one is rebuilt.
Be careful, Butte is not for Sunday School teachers - esp. late at night.

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/27592371

Pic - M&M Club 1939-1940

Ok got it. I adjusted my map based on your feedback. Couple of questions if you don't mind:

1) I changed WA to ID totally to go through Pullman/Palouse and cutover to Enaville. Seems to make a lot more sense than going up, dipping and then back up again. I can go to Spi

2) Can you confirm I have the section between Enaville and Thompson Falls right, and then from Thompson Falls down to Missoula? I mean that looks to be pretty much 200 to 93 just want to make sure that's ok to ride.

3) Should I try to avoid staying in Butte?

4) After Butte, it looks like I'm hugging 90 pretty much. Should I try to take frontage road as much as I can but otherwise just get on 90? Some of the deviations RWGPS takes me on I don't love because I'm not confident they aren't private road. I know it's not necessarily exciting riding but I'm a little nervous with this particular section because I just don't know anything about it.

5) I adjust Oregon to stay south of the river to Hood River. My understand is that section of trail between Cascade Locks and Hood River may largely be done this year. If not I can just hop on the interstate between that section can't I? I'd rather just to that and not have to go through figuring out how to take the Hood River Bridge.

Thanks again for the help!
« Last Edit: March 12, 2023, 09:40:42 pm by cosjp »