Author Topic: Must have spare parts/tools  (Read 13488 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline John Nettles

  • World Traveler
  • *****
  • Posts: 1871
  • I ride for smiles, not miles.
Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #30 on: March 22, 2023, 12:47:15 am »
And a harmonica.
(To fix your spirit when it gets low.)

LOL!

Or a penny whistle.
I can barely handle a kazoo much less anything more musical

Offline David W Pratt

  • World Traveler
  • *****
  • Posts: 127
  • Like bicycle based camping
Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #31 on: April 28, 2023, 06:43:49 am »
First, I heartily endorse what Ray said about the tool between your ears.
Second, make sure everything is in tip top shape before you set out.  The best repair is one you don't have to make.  I get a new patch kit every year to make sure the glue is not dried out.  I have a whole bag of unused ones.
Third, practice.  As per Murphy's dictum, when you have to fix a flat, it will be as night falls, with a storm coming in.
Have fun!

Offline froze

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #32 on: May 13, 2023, 04:33:30 pm »
I use Schwalbe Amotion tires (tubeless but I use tubes in them), which are highly flat-resistant, the second most flat-resistant tire they sell, PLUS I've put in flat liners! I highly doubt I would get a single flat, but things can go bad outside one's thoughts, so I take just one tube because I don't see the need for another, and if by chance I have to use that tube bike shops are not too far away, nor are places like Walmart, and since this tube is a 700x38 size it take up too much space to carry 2; and a dozen patches, 6 glueless patches (these no longer work well due to new material used in tubes, so they are only for an emergency get me somewhere patches) and three glue tubes.  I also carry 4 Park boot patches.  I do not replace the glue on patches every year because they rely on glue from a tube, thus there is nothing that can happen to that kind of patch that would prevent it from working even after 20 years.  I do replace the Park boot self-stick patches and the glueless patches because those are only good for a year.

I might carry a lightweight folding spare tire just to get me to a bike shop, I haven't decided yet, but I am starting to lean that way.

What you carry for spare tubes and patches is whatever you feel comfortable with, what I carry is what I feel comfortable with, you might be comfortable with 4 tubes and two dozen patches, but that's an individual call.

I found a new tire iron which I really like called the Lezyne Power XL, these levers were stronger than my Soma steel core levers which broke putting on those Amotion tires!  They make a smaller size but the XL I feel gives more leverage; and a single Pedro lever.  Those Amotion tires are a big pain to put on and take off, because of that pain, I also take a Kool Stop Tire Bead Jack because I almost broke my VAR trying to put those tires on so I needed something stronger.

Other tools include a Park MTB3, one Allen key because it's not on the mini, but I forget the size, maybe 8mm; cheap pair of folding pliers, which I just discovered were partially broken going through my stuff for this post, so I have to get another. I will start carrying a Lezyne Torque wrench because modern bikes require that sort of tool.  Tool-wise, that's it!

As far as parts go, I carry 3 heavy-duty zip-ties that are reusable, and 3 thinner black ones that are not. About 3 feet of duct tape; Loctite Superglue, the best out there; psi gauge; 3 Fiber Fix spokes which eliminate me from carrying around a freewheel tool to replace steel spokes.  Presta to Schrader converter in case my pump Presta side of the grommet fails I can reverse the grommet using the Schrader side and use the converter. a couple of water bottle cage screws, a couple of extra bolts for rack mount to frame. A couple of chain links. And that's all I carry for spare parts.

I thought about carrying a spare chain, but since I've never broken a chain, I figured some spare links would be just fine.

The pump I carry is the Zefal HPX2 frame pump. Yes, it is heavier than a mini, but since I use size 38 tires, I don't want to put in 500 strokes from a mini on the side of the road, no thank you.

After 40 years of riding and only having one spoke failure due to hitting a stick, and no other mechanical issues while out on the road, I just don't see the need for carrying either more tools or more spare parts.  If I was doing off-road riding or camping, I would probably carry some other stuff.

Side note regarding torque wrenches, most of you probably already know this, but when using any torque wrench never use it to loosen with, that will damage the small spring used to measure the amount of torque being applied.

Offline canalligators

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #33 on: May 14, 2023, 08:36:04 am »
I use Schwalbe Amotion tires (tubeless but I use tubes in them), which are highly flat-resistant, the second most flat-resistant tire they sell, PLUS I've put in flat liners! I highly doubt I would get a single flat, but things can go bad outside one's thoughts, so I take just one tube because I don't see the need for another, and if by chance I have to use that tube bike shops are not too far away, nor are places like Walmart, and since this tube is a 700x38 size it take up too much space to carry 2; and a dozen patches, 6 glueless patches (these no longer work well due to new material used in tubes, so they are only for an emergency get me somewhere patches) and three glue tubes.  I also carry 4 Park boot patches.  I do not replace the glue on patches every year because they rely on glue from a tube, thus there is nothing that can happen to that kind of patch that would prevent it from working even after 20 years.  I do replace the Park boot self-stick patches and the glueless patches because those are only good for a year.
Interesting strategy.  Make the tire/tube bulletproof then reduce the spares taken? 
Boots are easily made from old denim or nylon duck.
I might carry a lightweight folding spare tire just to get me to a bike shop, I haven't decided yet, but I am starting to lean that way.
I haven't generally carried a spare tire, but that bit me in the ass last year.  Even an old, used kevlar bead tire would make a good spare.  I'm also considering carrying a spare tire.  Or in my case two, since I have two wheel sizes.  And, always use tire sizes that can be bought most anywhere.  I doubt that WalMart carries 650B...

What you carry for spare tubes and patches is whatever you feel comfortable with, what I carry is what I feel comfortable with, you might be comfortable with 4 tubes and two dozen patches, but that's an individual call.
I'm not saying you do this, but it strikes me funny when people base decisions on "comfort level".  As long as that comfort is based on facts, not just abstract reasoning or fear, you have a good basis on which to make a decision.
I found a new tire iron which I really like called the Lezyne Power XL, these levers were stronger than my Soma steel core levers which broke putting on those Amotion tires!  They make a smaller size but the XL I feel gives more leverage; and a single Pedro lever.  Those Amotion tires are a big pain to put on and take off, because of that pain, I also take a Kool Stop Tire Bead Jack because I almost broke my VAR trying to put those tires on so I needed something stronger.
It is almost always true that, if someone is breaking tire levers, they aren't putting the tire on right.  There are exceptions, and your bulletproof setup may be one of them.  Putting a Marathon Plus on just about anything is really hard to do without tools.  It took two people and a lever or two to get one on my Rhyno Lite rims.
As far as parts go, I carry 3 heavy-duty zip-ties that are reusable, and 3 thinner black ones that are not. About 3 feet of duct tape; Loctite Superglue, the best out there; psi gauge; 3 Fiber Fix spokes which eliminate me from carrying around a freewheel tool to replace steel spokes.  Presta to Schrader converter in case my pump Presta side of the grommet fails I can reverse the grommet using the Schrader side and use the converter. a couple of water bottle cage screws, a couple of extra bolts for rack mount to frame. A couple of chain links. And that's all I carry for spare parts.
You've thought this out well and I agree with almost all of it.
I thought about carrying a spare chain, but since I've never broken a chain, I figured some spare links would be just fine.
Agreed.  I carry 1.5 full links and two quick links.
The pump I carry is the Zefal HPX2 frame pump. Yes, it is heavier than a mini, but since I use size 38 tires, I don't want to put in 500 strokes from a mini on the side of the road, no thank you.
Your call.  I rode with a father and son toting trailers, they shared a floor pump.  Maybe carry one per group.
After 40 years of riding and only having one spoke failure due to hitting a stick, and no other mechanical issues while out on the road, I just don't see the need for carrying either more tools or more spare parts.  If I was doing off-road riding or camping, I would probably carry some other stuff.
Agreed.  Carry tools to fix the most likely problems.
Side note regarding torque wrenches, most of you probably already know this, but when using any torque wrench never use it to loosen with, that will damage the small spring used to measure the amount of torque being applied.
Wouldn't this depend on the design of your particular torque wrench? 

Offline froze

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #34 on: May 14, 2023, 09:43:50 pm »

Interesting strategy.  Make the tire/tube bulletproof then reduce the spares taken? 
Boots are easily made from old denim or nylon duck.

Schwalbe makes what they call a flat proof tire called the Marathon Plus Tour, but I decided against that tire due to the 900 gram weight, the Amotion V Guard at 490 grams even with the Clear Motion Rhinodillos liner which is 160 grams is still about 250 grams each lighter, plus the Amotion has much lower rolling resistance.

Some argue that liners cause flats, that is true with the Mr Tuffy's, especially is using them with an ultralight tube, but the Rhinodillo has one side of the liner that uses a soft edge instead of a hard edge, and that soft edge prevents the edge of the liner from rubbing a hole into the tube.

I haven't generally carried a spare tire, but that bit me in the ass last year.  Even an old, used kevlar bead tire would make a good spare.  I'm also considering carrying a spare tire. 


Yeah, I'll probably carry a spare tire after reading your experience, weird stuff can happen, and since the tire is always hitting stuff, and with a load that extra weight can cause more damage to a tire then without the extra weight, so yeah.


I'm not saying you do this, but it strikes me funny when people base decisions on "comfort level".  As long as that comfort is based on facts, not just abstract reasoning or fear, you have a good basis on which to make a decision.

I toured on Panaracer Tour Guard Plus tires, not near the tire of the Amotion, and never had a flat, but since I am planning on doing a cross country tour I stepped up the quality and toughness of the tire.  The Panaracer TG lasted about 4500 miles, not bad but the Amotion's should go twice that, plus it has superior flat protection.  I did use those liners in the Panaracer though, but I didn't see any penetration areas on the Panaracer when they wore out.  I think I have more than enough patches, and "if" I get low, bike shop here I come, but I doubt that will happen with those tires.  So my comfort is based on previous experience, plus a huge safety margin past that, I'm more than comfortable with it.


It is almost always true that, if someone is breaking tire levers, they aren't putting the tire on right.  There are exceptions, and your bulletproof setup may be one of them.  Putting a Marathon Plus on just about anything is really hard to do without tools.  It took two people and a lever or two to get one on my Rhyno Lite rims.

That's the beauty of levers like the VAR and the Kool Stop lever, they slide the tire up and over the rim instead of prying it up and over which takes space which people don't have especially with tubeless designed tires, add a tube into that design of a tire and it can become a huge issue.  I even used soapy water on the tires to get them on, and it was still tough.  I've put on a lot of tires over the 40 plus years I've been riding, and I know a lot a tricks, which is one of the reasons why I take along the larger reuseable zip ties, when you put on a tough tire the opposite end from where you're using the levers slides out the rim, so I take two zip ties and cinch those around the tire and rim real tight, the go to work on the opposite side, those zip ties prevent the bead from slipping off the rim frustrating the crap out of a person.

Your call.  I rode with a father and son toting trailers, they shared a floor pump.  Maybe carry one per group.
For me since I'll be going alone, carrying a floor pump is too much weight and bulk, the Zefal can reach 55 psi in those 38c tires in about 80 strokes, my floor pump at home can do it in 70, so I'm only losing 10 strokes to the floor pump, and the Zefal fastens to the frame so it doesn't take any space in a pannier, plus it's lighter in weight vs a floor job.


Wouldn't this depend on the design of your particular torque wrench?
  No, it doesn't matter if it's a clicker, beam, dial, digital, or whatever, trying to loosen a bolt with one will damage the calibration of the wrench.

Offline donald.stewart.92

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #35 on: May 15, 2023, 08:11:37 pm »
Take the Fiberfix spoke replacement. Worth it’s weight in gold.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline dusanyu

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #36 on: May 19, 2023, 09:11:40 pm »
I have yet to do anything super long distance just a few week  Trips across the state but have been in some pinches. and most of my opinions on tools are from Being a Auto mechanic for years as well as having been stranded in the middle of farm country because I forgot to bring the wrong tools or brought something that broke

1 : Don't skimp on your tools that wrench set from amazon may look great in the price department but a broken tool is not going to do you any good Hit eBay and look for Craftsman from the 80's or 90's these tools are US made and are on par with Mac or Snap-On in quality and will take way more abuse than repairing a bike will ever give you

2: before leaving on your trop "Dry run any repairs you think you may need to do on the side of the road and bring the tools you found you need to do the job the logical thing will be a metric Allen key set, a couple combination wrenches (you may need to carry more than on of the same size go hold a bolt while you torque a nut ) a screwdriver handle with the usual suspects for bits 2 sizes of Phillips perhaps a torques or two if you bike has em but I found that my cargo bike has the rear wheel nuts partly recessed so I needed to add a ratchet and a 16mm deep well socket
as far as Allen keys Ekland tools sells a key set that fold up like a pocket knife its harder to leave behind than a couple loose Allen keys  and you also have access to sizes other than what on your bike so you can help others

3: Dont forget the incidental tools a proper set of pliers is going to be better than a leatherman if your working with a master link use something you can trust so that clip don't go shooting into some farmer's field, Take a small light chain breaker and master links! breaking a chain is bad breaking a chain and not having a way to fix it is a torment worthy of Sisyphus. if you need glasses bring tools and a few extra screws for them don't forget the little things like a pump tire leavers, tube, patch kit if your riding down the side of a highway you will eat a wire from a steel belted radial Headlamp, Flashlight as a backup

4: personally I take a Magnetic parts bowl to not loose any parts as I am working also if you drop a tool or a part the powerful magnet on the parts bowl can help you find it
« Last Edit: May 19, 2023, 09:16:26 pm by dusanyu »

Offline misterflask

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #37 on: June 15, 2023, 10:47:06 pm »
I used to be neurotic about having a way to remove cassettes to replace spokes.  I used to carry the cute little Stein lockring tool, but it puts a disturbing amount of stress on the dropout, especially if the lockring is torqued down properly (I used to run the lockrings undertorqued but dragons lie there).  I now use a Velo Orange hub that disassembles by hand and as a bonus uses sealed bearings.  I think fiberfix spoke doesn't require removing cassette so another plus for those.

Upvote on wire ties.  I cracked a rear dropout once and wire ties held the frame together well enough to ride 30 miles.

The luxury tool I don't carry (yet) is a pair of mini channel locks to pop loose Quick Links.

Offline BikeliciousBabe

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #38 on: June 16, 2023, 08:59:47 am »
As per Murphy's dictum, when you have to fix a flat, it will be as night falls, with a storm coming in.

And you might not notice the flat until you wake up the next morning.  Ask me how I know.

Offline j1of1

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #39 on: June 19, 2023, 03:14:37 pm »
I carry a spare tube and C02 cartridges PLUS a pump.   When I get a flat I don't try to patch the tube that went flat instead I replace it with my spare tube and inflate that using the CO2 cartridge to get me going again.  Later that day, at the campsite or hotel, I'll patch the tube that went flat and deflate the tire that was filled with the CO2 cartridge and reinflate using my pump.

HOWEVER....I have yet to find a bike frame pump which will easily inflate a tire to its recommended pressure.   I'm current using a Topeak Mini Morph pump which is good, but still can't get me to the desired pressure.  My experiences reveal you need to have the muscles of Schwarzenegger and plenty of time in order to get even close to the desired pressure.  Nothing like a good floor pump to do the job...

Offline bik3rd00d@yahoo.com

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #40 on: July 14, 2023, 05:48:22 pm »
Not sure if this thread is about repairing a bike during a tour or just fixing flats. 

- my RoadMorgG pump, which I carry in my frame bag,  has gotten lots of guys going that only had CO2 cartridges
- I don't carry CO2 cartridges any longer ... see above
- Start your tour with tires with a reputation of being puncture resistant.  yeah obvious I think
- I never patch a tube on the side of a trail.  I replace with my spare and patch the bad tube that evening. 
- I don't carry tools that don't fit a fastener on my bike.  totally unnecessary.  why a multi tool when you can bring specific tools.  You dont need that many
- If you think your going to need to replace something on the trip.  Why wait.   Replace well before you leave: chain, cassette, chain rings, pads, cables, tubes, tires ....
- extra tires?   I only carry an extra tube.   but I do carry patch kits and know how to use them.
- I am shy of tubeless on a touring bike.  Sealant hassles are not fun ... ever.
- I like touring rims that are NOT tubeless ready.   so much easier to break the bead.  I like easy
- an extra derailleur hanger maybe ... light, cheap, small ... why not
- I don't bother but you could blue loctite all your fasteners .. racks esp

I think experience reflects how you approach bike repair.  My goal is to leave for a tour with my bike as bullet proof as possible.   Then, have modest means for fixing what breaks when the adventure begins.

Offline rayed

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #41 on: October 13, 2023, 03:56:45 pm »
Not sure if this thread is about repairing a bike during a tour or just fixing flats. 

- my RoadMorgG pump, which I carry in my frame bag,  has gotten lots of guys going that only had CO2 cartridges
- I don't carry CO2 cartridges any longer ... see above
- Start your tour with tires with a reputation of being puncture resistant.  yeah obvious I think
- I never patch a tube on the side of a trail.  I replace with my spare and patch the bad tube that evening. 
- I don't carry tools that don't fit a fastener on my bike.  totally unnecessary.  why a multi tool when you can bring specific tools.  You dont need that many
- If you think your going to need to replace something on the trip.  Why wait.   Replace well before you leave: chain, cassette, chain rings, pads, cables, tubes, tires ....
- extra tires?   I only carry an extra tube.   but I do carry patch kits and know how to use them.
- I am shy of tubeless on a touring bike.  Sealant hassles are not fun ... ever.
- I like touring rims that are NOT tubeless ready.   so much easier to break the bead.  I like easy
- an extra derailleur hanger maybe ... light, cheap, small ... why not
- I don't bother but you could blue loctite all your fasteners .. racks esp

I think experience reflects how you approach bike repair.  My goal is to leave for a tour with my bike as bullet proof as possible.   Then, have modest means for fixing what breaks when the adventure begins.
I'm glad you liked the list! Ordering the missing items sounds like a good plan. Enve customer service might indeed be the way to go for a hassle-free experience. They can assist you by simply providing them with a list of the parts you're missing, and they'll take care of the rest. It's always reassuring to have a responsive and helpful customer service team to rely on. It's exciting to hear that you'll be gearing up for some long bike trips starting next spring. With the additional parts from Enve, you'll be well-prepared to make the most of your cycling adventures. Long bike trips can be incredibly rewarding, offering the chance to explore new places and enjoy the great outdoors. Here's to a fantastic season of cycling ahead!
« Last Edit: October 18, 2023, 01:13:38 pm by rayed »

Offline hikerjer

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #42 on: October 21, 2023, 06:55:51 pm »
I don't know if they really qualify as a tool, but I find a few plastic zip ties can come in extremely handy on occasion.  Ditto with some duct tape.  I also find a good pair of tweezers come in handy for picking out a piece of glass or thorn embedded in your tire if you get a flat. They can be tough to get out with your fingers.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Must have spare parts/tools
« Reply #43 on: October 22, 2023, 06:00:20 am »
What are five words you will never hear a redneck say? Answer. Duct tape can't fix it.