Author Topic: first aid kits  (Read 8847 times)

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Offline Badger

first aid kits
« on: March 06, 2006, 03:01:17 pm »
Not to much discussion about this.  I made one up trying to think what minor things could go wrong from eye wash to upset stomach.  Any other ideas?


Offline TwoWheeledExplorer

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first aid kits
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2006, 03:44:10 pm »
The "football" goes with me wherever I go by bike, foot, skis or snowshoes. It's and OR tri-fold red pack with a star-of-life sewn on the outside. I am an EMT, and a National Mountain Bike Patroller, so I built my own kit based on the concept that I would mostly be helping someone else. So far, that has mostly not been the way it works out, but at least when I hurt myself, I have what I need to patch me back up. I have a splint, bandaging and blister stuff, Koban, tape, scissors, etc. and a pencil and report form (to send with the person who goes for help.)

REI sells some good kits, which I think are actually made by Adventure Medical Kits. If the one you like doesn't have a SAM splint in it, add it to the set.

Check out www.trailpatrol.org/equipment.htm for what we require our patrol members to carry in their first aid kits.

Ride safe,
Hans

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

This message was edited by Trailpatrol on 3-6-06 @ 11:50 AM
2WX: The Two-Wheeled Explorer
www.twowheeledexplorer.org
"St. Louis to the Western Sea if nothing prevents."--John Ordway, Corps of Discovery

Offline Peaks

first aid kits
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2006, 05:09:49 pm »
Well, it all depends on your level of comfort.  In general, most bike routes go through small towns where there is a small store to buy the basics.  

As a minimum, I'd recommend being prepared to road rash.  Almost anything else, I'll buy if and when I need it.


Offline ptaylor

first aid kits
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2006, 09:21:17 pm »
I pretty much agree with Peaks. Bag Balm for saddle sores, road rash and sunburn. Gauze and adhesive tape for road rash, and that's about it. I also take antacids and ibuprofin, but I don't think I have ever used them.

Gramps
Paul

Offline TwoWheeledExplorer

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first aid kits
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2006, 07:31:24 pm »
Most of my riding is off-pavement, so I carry the infamous "10 Essentials" with me in either my hydration/daypack or my rackpack. One of the 10 Essentials is a good first aid kit, and, of course, knowing how to use it.

Ride safe,
Hans

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

This message was edited by Trailpatrol on 3-8-06 @ 3:31 PM
2WX: The Two-Wheeled Explorer
www.twowheeledexplorer.org
"St. Louis to the Western Sea if nothing prevents."--John Ordway, Corps of Discovery

Offline ptaylor

first aid kits
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2006, 10:05:33 pm »
OK Hans. What are the 'infamous "10 Essentials" '? Toilet paper, a bottle of Rum, a lovely lass, what?


Gramps
Paul

Offline TwoWheeledExplorer

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first aid kits
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2006, 05:12:01 pm »
Hmmmm..."OK Hans. What are the 'infamous "10 Essentials" '? Toilet paper, (you could use it to start a fire) a bottle of Rum, (Same ;p ) a lovely lass,(hypothermia prevention?) what?
Gramps"

Okay. All seriousity here:
The "Ten Essentials" were first put together by The Mountaineers in WA. For a long time they often varied by sport and season. A couple years ago they came out with this list that is more-or-less universal.

The Ten Essential Systems
 
The following list is made up of items that everyone who ventures onto a trail or into the backcountry should have. You could add more, possibly, but these are the basics.

1. Navigation (map and compass)
2. Sun protection
3. Insulation (extra clothing)
4. Illumination (flashlight/headlamp)
5. First-aid supplies
6. Fire
7. Repair kit and tools
8. Nutrition (extra food)
9. Hydration (extra water)
10. Emergency shelter
 
Ride safe,
Hans


 

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org
2WX: The Two-Wheeled Explorer
www.twowheeledexplorer.org
"St. Louis to the Western Sea if nothing prevents."--John Ordway, Corps of Discovery

Offline driftlessregion

first aid kits
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2006, 10:56:16 pm »
I recommend taking the Red Cross First Aid class so you know how to use what's in the kit and how to make a splint etc. I added diphenhydramine (generic Benadryl) for bites and an epipen for bee stings.


Offline TwoWheeledExplorer

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first aid kits
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2006, 10:26:56 am »
Wilderness first aid classes are better for anyone who will be any distance from normal EMS response. They can be found through Google or local outdoors stores and clubs.

OTC Benadryl is good. Epinephrine (Epi-pen) is a prescription item, which is not an issue if you (and your doctor) know you have a bee sting (or other anaphylatic) allergies. Otherwise you may have to convince a doc why you need it.

Other over-the-counter meds I carry are:
Analgesics: (pain pills)

Aspirin: 1 a day keeps the heart attack or stroke away if no allergy, bleeding, ulcers or other reason. 2 every 4 hrs. for fever or minor pain. (Don't use aspirin in kids without medical advice
Ibuprofen: Basically the same effects as aspirin though not usually given for the blood thinning effect. Better pain relief, fever control and antiinflammatory effect than aspirin. Somewhat less stomach upset but still causes that.
Tylenol: (acetaminophen) Only good for fever and minor pain.

Anti-histamines: (for allergies, itch, nausea and sea-sickness)

Benadryl for anything that itches or sneezes, e.g. hay fever, allergies. 25-50 mg. every 4 hrs.
Meclizine 12.5-25 mg. (Dramamine II): motion sickness

Decongestants:

Afrin spray: For nasal congestion.
Pseudoephedrine (30-60 mg. every 4-6 hrs) for nasal congestion

(I also carry "Contac" for severe cold/allergy symptoms.)

Gastrointestinal Medications:

Rolaids or Tums (Liquid are more effective, but tablets are easier to carry.)
Acid neutralizers: Zantac or Pepcid or generic equals
Dulcolax: For constipation
Imodium AD: (Loperamide)For diarrhea.
 
Skin Meds:

Antiinflamatory:2 1/2% cortisone cream

Antibiotic ointment:Bacitracin, polysporin,

Antifungal: Lotrimin or clotrimazole

Note: I only cary a few of these each...not the whole package. from 24 Ibuprofen to 2 Contac. 4-10 of everything else.

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

This message was edited by Trailpatrol on 3-15-06 @ 7:31 AM
2WX: The Two-Wheeled Explorer
www.twowheeledexplorer.org
"St. Louis to the Western Sea if nothing prevents."--John Ordway, Corps of Discovery

Offline pmspirito

first aid kits
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2006, 09:03:49 pm »
With past experience as a fire fighter and first responder, after a serious crash ya gotta be able to stop the blood flow.  If you can't talk your local EMT out of a 3x10 trauma dressing then carry a (don't laugh) individually wrapped super size sanitary napkin.  And some tape to keep it in place.     ;)

best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito
best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito