Author Topic: Neck Problem  (Read 3534 times)

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Offline dave2100

Neck Problem
« on: July 20, 2006, 09:03:10 pm »
On a 206 mile ride I just took (one day), about 160 miles in to the ride I couldn't lift my head from my road bike riding position.  With the position of my head, I couldn't see beyond my front wheel. I would have to stand on my pedals, coast, stretch back, look ahead, sit, ride, and then do it all over again (a neck brace would have been handy). Has anyone ever had this problem? If so, do you have any advice on how to prevent it or fix it once it happens (there was no warning at all, I felt fine and then one minute, I couldn't lift my head up). This is my first time posting, please be kind if I've made a mistake.


Offline wanderingwheel

Neck Problem
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2006, 04:30:49 am »
This is a condition called Shermer's Neck and is not uncommon among ultra-distance racers.  However, it should not be a problem over "only" 200 miles.  My best guess is that this is due to improper positioning for the long ride and bad habits.

First of all, consider slightly changing your position for long one-day rides.  Move the handlebars up and/or back by changing the stem, flipping the stem over, or rolling the handlebars up.  It is possible to ride 200 miles in a racing position, but in my experience it is not ideal.  The raacing position is less comfortable and will ultimately be slower even though it may be more aerodynamic.

Now for the bad habits.  Many riders, especially men, ride hunched over and with rounded shoulders.  Even if your position is not aggressive, it still forces you to strain your neck to see forward.  If you ride hunched over, make the effort every time your ride to pull your shoulders back and bring your chest up and forward.  It may help to imagine you are being towed forward by a harness starped just under your arms.  This will also roll your hips forward and recruit more muscles such as your lower back and butt to help with the pedaling.  Many riders find that they need to adjust their bike after breaking the old habit, usually by pushing the handlebars out and/or moving the saddle forward.

Hope this helps
Sean


Offline dave2100

Neck Problem
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2006, 12:51:36 pm »
Thank you very much for that information Sean. I just read some articles on Shermer's neck and it's exactly what happened to me. I also had an auto accident (rear ended by someone traveling 60 mph and I was almost at a dead stop in my car) and it did do some damage to my neck. I had myself fitted on the bike twice before the event, but I will watch out for posture while riding(always a possibility I may have started riding with poor posture during the course of the ride). I will also bring along a small collar from now on just in case. Thanks again, it was extremely helpful.


Offline pmspirito

Neck Problem
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2006, 10:08:27 pm »
Buy a recumbent

best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito
best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito