Author Topic: NUMB "SEAT"  (Read 5245 times)

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Offline HONDO

NUMB "SEAT"
« on: July 21, 2006, 08:25:18 am »
Ive been logging 35 plus miles a day getting my new touring bicycle broken in but the problem is two-fold. First is my "man area"  going numb if I climb for 15 minutes or more on a decent grade and lastly my elbows have been bothering me, feeling like they are being twisted like you do a knee. Ive got a brooks saddle and it feels great.Ive put a level on it which shows a quarter inch high at the nose of the seat. the riding height feels perfect. any suggestions?


Offline wanderingwheel

NUMB "SEAT"
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2006, 02:33:18 pm »
The saddle nose sounds a little high, but if it's comfortable then so be it.  Since the problem only comes while climbing, how does your position change when you start going up?  Many people slide towards the back of the saddle so that they can apply more force to the pedals at a lower rpm.  What this also does is force the rider to bend over more to reach the handlebars and that can be the cause of the unwanted pressure.

Given that, Here's a few suggestions to try.  First, lift yourself off the saddle for a few seconds when youstart to go numb.  Specialized has put a lot of effort into trying to prove how much better thier saddles are than others based on bloodflow, but when asked why all the riders on all the other saddles haven't had long-term problems if their saddles are so bad, Specialized had to admit that simply getting off the saddle for a few seconds every so often prevented any problems.

Next, if you are grinding up hill at a low cadence, try shifting to a lower gear and using a heigher cadence.  This will naturally bring you back to the middle of the saddle where you are comfortable.

Finally, make sure that you are supporting yourself on your sit bones rather than any soft areas.  If you're not sure try rolling your hips forward and back a few times until you find them.

As for your elbows, it sounds like you are putting an unnatural stress on them.  This could either be from poor hand placement or from too much weight on the hands.  

Are your hands in a natural position on the bars or do they feel tweeked at an odd angle?  Put your hands out in front of you to about where your bars are located and notice where your hands want to be.  Try to replicate that on the bike if possible.  

Are you leaning forward heavily on your hands?  Ideally you should be able to take your hands off the bars and leave your upper body in the same position.  This requires you to support yourself with your abs and core muscles.  If you can't do this, consider changing your position to sit more upright for the time being.

Sean


Offline HONDO

NUMB "SEAT"
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2006, 04:59:30 pm »
Thanks for the help.Im used to mt.bike bars and for some reason im sure im putting too much pressure on my arms and im somehow tweeking my elbows.As far as seat height, when I "sit up" I can ride and still have my fingers on the top of the drop bars although I cant wrap them around.Does that sound about right? I think I really need to get the nose down that quarter inch and see how that works and pay more attention to how Im locking my elbows out.Im sure its all minor adjustments but its a bit frustrating and NUMB is not good.


Offline wanderingwheel

NUMB "SEAT"
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2006, 02:49:57 pm »
Let's try and bury this morning's spam.

Seat height and position should be related to your leg length and strength.  If your handlebars feel too low, raise them rather than lowering the saddle.  It sounds like your bars are set up low, which is not necessarily wrong, but may not be appropriate for you right now.  Also, the combination of a nose-high saddle and low bars is about the worst thing you can do if you want to get rid of numbness.

Are you actually locking your elbows when you ride?  Your arms should be bent and loose.  This will prevent you from putting excess pressure on your hands and elbows, help you absorb any bumps in the road, and give you greater control over the bike.

Sean


Offline HONDO

NUMB "SEAT"
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2006, 05:20:16 pm »
I think bringing the nose down to level and raising the bars just a bit should do it. Not sure how much to bring the bars up, maybe half to one inch? I dont want to tweek the seat height anymore because it feels perfect. thanks Sean.


Offline mtnroads

NUMB "SEAT"
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2006, 02:35:59 am »
I have the same problem when climbing in the drops on my 520, with a Brooks saddle and the stem (quill) as high as it will go, which is still an inch below seat height. The drops are just enough lower than the hoods to start the problem. I can't lower the front of my saddle because then I slide forward and it makes it even worse. Aargh.

My solution is to get a higher stem and I am planning on a long one, since it is a quill and I can vary the position. I will raise it an inch and even more for longer rides. I would suggest going 1-2" higher and maybe 10cm shorter, to also bring you back a bit. Good luck.


Offline pmspirito

NUMB "SEAT"
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2006, 09:48:57 pm »
Isn't it odd,  that recumbent riders never complain about pain.  Maybe they are on to something.  Come to think of it I have never seen an easy chair shaped like a bike seat.  But recumbent seats are shaped like easy chairs.  

best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito
best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito