Author Topic: One way rental  (Read 4251 times)

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Offline Ken

One way rental
« on: January 23, 2008, 08:39:32 pm »
Has anyone had any experience of one-way rental for touring bikes?
We - four of us - are planning a tour of 300-500 miles in September, probably in New England. Normally we bring our own bikes but airlines and security aren't too bike friendly these days.
So we are thinking of renting. Do many bike shops allow one-way rentals? We could arrange to ship the bikes back by Fedex or whatever. It would probably be best to get a bike shop at the other end to box them for us.
Does anyone - renter or courier - specialize in this kind of service?
Ken - Sydney Australia


Offline JayH

One way rental
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2008, 08:58:07 pm »
I bet you could find a bike shop that will do that for you for a fee. Many bike shops will receive a bike and assemble it for you for a fee so I don't think this would be a problem.  You're best bet would be post where you're going and maybe somebody here can recommend a particular shop...  

I think you're bigger problem would be finding a bike shop that actually rents touring capable bikes...


Jay

This message was edited by JayH on 1-23-08 @ 4:58 PM

Offline mfisher

One way rental
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2008, 11:05:19 pm »
I actually just signed up to ask this exact question. I was hoping to start in Phoenix/Tempe and end in San Diego. Is it feasible?


Tangentially, is it possible at all to fly with a bike? How?

Thanks in advance!


Offline Ken

One way rental
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2008, 12:07:25 am »
Yes, it is possible to fly with a bike.George Farnsworth's venerable site has lots of information.
Bike Access

I have taken bikes to Europe from Australia several times. The problems are getting to and from airports, going through customs and security etc
Easier if you are doing a point to point trip, rather than one with several stops, as we will be.


Offline Ken

One way rental
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2008, 12:09:34 am »
"I bet you could find a bike shop that will do that for you for a fee. Many bike shops will receive a bike and assemble it for you for a fee so I don't think this would be a problem.  You're best bet would be post where you're going and maybe somebody here can recommend a particular shop... "

Good idea. We might start in Bay Harbor Maine or perhaps somewhere in the Boston area.



Offline valygrl

One way rental
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2008, 12:44:01 am »
Ken

I would recommend you check carefully on the baggage rules of your airline.  I think you might be surprised that the bike may fly free.  I have flown twice internationally (New Zealand & Australia) from the USA, and both times my bike went free as one piece of luggage.  I just looked at Qantas' policy http://www.qantas.com.au/info/flying/beforeYouTravel/sportingEquipment
and they allow a bike free as one of two pieces of luggage.  I was able to get 3 of my panniers into one duffel bag, the other was my carry-on, the handlebar bag was my "purse" - also carry-on, and I was charged NOTHING to fly with the boxed bike.

Within the US, airlines charge $50-$80 per trip for the boxed bike.  

Security is not particularly bike-unfriendly, you just have to follow the rules, and pack in such a way that you won't lose anything when they open the box, which they will.  That means no loose objects in the bike box - bag any loose things and tape or zip-tie to the bike frame.  It also helps to get to the airport in plenty of time, so you are relaxed, and be friendly and accommodating with the gate agents.

Also, check on the FedEx charges, last time I looked it cost around $130 to fedex a bike across the USA.

Good luck, and happy touring!


Offline biker_james

One way rental
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2008, 07:44:14 am »
One thing to keep in mind about flying your bike nowadays is that while it can fly free on some airlines, it still has to come within the baggage limits for most of them anyway. Which means that they may not charge for the bike, but if your bike and everything else you carry goes over 20kg, then you'll pay by the kg or pound for the overweight.


Offline JayH

One way rental
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2008, 09:36:07 am »
Hi ken, I assume you mean Bar Harbor, ME

I suggest you talk to ACA member here: Sailariel since he lives in Belfast which is just about a little over an hour's drive from Bar Harbor and would know bike shops.

I am pretty sure there is a bike shop in Ellesworth, ME which is on the mainland just before you get to Mt Desert Island which is where Bar Harbor is..   Anyway, there's probably one in Bar Harbor too as it's quite a popular cycling destination on the carriageways there.    

As far as flying in yourself, Bangor would be your destination I think. It's an international airport that is not terribly far from Bar Harbor. and then a taxi/van shuttle to Acadia could get you to your bike.

Jay


Offline RussellSeaton

One way rental
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2008, 10:10:21 am »
August 2007.  Midwest to Paris flight.  Northwest Airlines charged $120 for the Trico Iron Case outbound.  Its was below the 50 pound weight limit.  A friend was charged the $120 plus extra for a bike case over the weight limit.  Coming back September 2007.  Paris to midwest.  Air France starting, transfer to Northwest once we got into the US for connections.  No charge.  Others making the same trip from various airports in the US to Paris and back were charged nothing both ways to being charged nothing going out and charged coming back and charged both ways.  Its hit or miss whether you pay or not.  Most airlines have in their regulations on the website that bikes pay extra.  REGARDLESS if its an international trip or not.  Makes no difference now days, unlike in days of old.  A very few airliines still say bikes are just one piece of luggage and are treated that way.

No hassle traveling with the bike other than hauling the thing through the airport, subways, trains.  Finding a place to store it while biking.  Getting it into cabs/rental cars.  The security people at the airport open the case/box and look at it so make sure its packaged so they can easily get it back in the case and close the case easily.  I'd advise against jamming lots of extra stuff into the case even if its within the weight limit.  Loose parts in the case may not make it back into the case when its inspected.  Make it simple for the security people.

As for the idea of renting touring bikes, not for me.  I'd change the trip and ride my own bike.


Offline DaveB

One way rental
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2008, 10:15:47 am »
I would be very surprised if a bike shop would rent under those conditions and, if they did, the cost (rental plus shipping it back) would likely exceed the cost of either taking your own bike on the airplane or shipping your bike to a shop at your starting point and shipping it back home from your ending point.  

The other negative of rentals is getting a bike of the type you want and that fits. Most rentals are cheap hybrids or cruisers meant for tooling around the local area by sightseers.  Renting a true turing bike is next to impossible.  


Offline litespeed

One way rental
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2008, 02:13:32 pm »
With four of you it might be worthwhile for you to rent a small U-Haul truck, throw all the bikes in the back and take them wherever you want. U-Haul is everywhere. And you can often get a big discount if they have a surplus of vehicles at your starting point and a shortage at your destination.


Offline DaveB

One way rental
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2008, 09:45:32 pm »
I think getting a U-Haul from Australia to New England might be a bit difficult.  I don't believe they float very well.   ;)


Offline litespeed

One way rental
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2008, 02:14:57 pm »
Right. I missed your address there. Have you talked to Qantas about taking your bikes with you? It's one of the world's finest airlines. A lot of international airlines take bicycles as regular luggage.


Offline Ken

One way rental
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2008, 07:18:15 pm »
Yes, getting the bikes to the US is no great problem. We have flown them to Europe 6-8 times.
The difficulty is to and from airports - boxed, they won't fit in the trunks of cabs - and that is compounded when we want to make several stops before or after the ride. I looked to getting Fedex or someone to ship them to and from the ride, but that was expensive.
Hence the idea of renting.
Some years ago we rented quite good hybrids with panniers and all from a LBS in Seattle and rode the San Juan Islands, ending up in Victoria BC. We then got the ferry back to Seattle and returned the bikes.
So I was surprised to find that good quality touring bikes are difficult to rent in the East.
Enough. We might settle for an organised tour including bikes.
Thanks all for your suggestions.