Author Topic: Signing the Routes  (Read 7471 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline macguys

Signing the Routes
« on: December 31, 2006, 05:42:04 pm »
I'm wondering if anyone at ACA has considered the feasability of establishing signage standards for the bike routes.  I live very close to the Southern Tier and see riders on it frequently in the spring and fall, and occasionally during the summer and winter.  

I know that it would cost a bundle for ACA to sign the routes, but if a graphics standard were established, bike clubs and governments along the routes might be willing to participate in the signage.  

I realize that routes change and that signs have a potential downside, but I'm a lot more interested in their use as advertising for cycle tourism then as actual direction signs.  

What do you think?


Offline ptaylor

Signing the Routes
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2007, 08:53:27 pm »
Mac.

I'm surprised that no one has responded to your post. It is a great idea. Is there no one on this forum who has knowledge of state/national DOT signage policies?

I think this would be the responsibility of the state Departments Of Transportation (DOT's), and they work at the pleasure of the funding available, but it is 'us' who make that funding available.

I am writing a new post tonight. There is currently an open topic on Urban Bicycling, which explores bike friendly cities. I am going to open a topic of Bicycle Friendly States.

Paul
Paul

Offline wanderingwheel

Signing the Routes
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2007, 09:12:37 pm »
There are a number of states that have signed cross-state routes.  The Trans-Am is also signed in some places, usually with some variation on the number 76.  As Paul said, these signs have been put up and are maintained (or not, in some cases) by each state's DOT.  Some cities also sign their own point-to-point routes.

Sean


Offline RussellSeaton

Signing the Routes
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2007, 12:02:42 pm »
To follow up on the signage in states.  In my state we have the yellow triangle signs saying "Share the Road" and a picture of a bicycle.  And we have small rectangle green signs which say "Bike Route".  Obviously these are very generic signs.  I would guess all signs, except billboards, are controlled and put up by governments.  And billborads are regulated somehow.  I do not know if any state would put up signs advertising a private, even non-profit, company's bike route.  Even if the company paid for the signs and put them up themselves.  Having a private company's signs on the public road right of ways would most likely violate many laws and regulations.  I think in my state the DOT came out with a ruling saying those white cross memorials where people crash on the road are not legal and the DOT will remove them at their discretion.  I suspect the only legal way to have the trans continental routes marked is with privately funded billboards on private property billboards.  Or get Congress to officially recognize the trans continental routes as official historic, scenic routes, like Route 66.  I think Route 66 has various signs saying how historic and scenic it is.  And the Old Lincoln Highway, 30, has some signs like this too.


Offline macguys

Signing the Routes
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2007, 12:09:24 pm »
I know it's a big deal and there are lots of problems.  However many of the US log walk trails have plenty of signs including some on public roads indicating the crossing.  It's a safety thing but also a way of drawing public attention to a very cool activity.


Offline RussellSeaton

Signing the Routes
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2007, 12:20:47 pm »
"However many of the US log walk trails have plenty of signs including some on public roads indicating the crossing."

But no official company, like Adventure Cycling Association, created the various walking trails.  They are sort of like the Oregon Trail for the wagon trains going west.  They exist because of past events.  But with the various cross country bike routes, they were specifically created by ACA.  And ACA sells maps and promotes their usage.  I think the commercial interests of ACA in the bike routes would prevent any government body from putting up signs.  If ACA can disassociate itself from the bike routes and get Congress to recognize the routes as historic or scenic routes, such as the Appalachia Trail, the Trail of Tears, etc., then states could be influenced to put up signs.


Offline Sailariel

Signing the Routes
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2007, 02:57:29 pm »
In Maine we have the Share The Road signs placed strategically where the repair lane narrows or becomes non-existant. It is usually on an uphill where the road turns into two lanes to encourage passing. These signs are promoted by the Bike Coalition of Maine (BCM). There are no signs, to my knowledge, designating bike routes--at least not in Midcoast Maine. Maine DOT puts out a free bike tour loop book. For anyone biking in Maine this is a good resouce. Maine Department of Transportation, #16 State House Station, Augusta ME 04333-0016. This is a well done book which is profusely illustrated and very informative. Also shows where all the bike shops are along with Convenience stores, ATM locations, camping,restaurants, etc.


Offline macguys

Signing the Routes
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2007, 04:00:11 pm »
Actually there is an organization behind each of the long trails and their business models are much like ACA's.  They sell guides and other information and accept contributions.  They also get involved in helping facilitate the purchase of routes (mostly by local/state/federal governments) to expand and protect the trails.  The Applachain Trail Conversancy is an example.  In my state of Florida, the Florida Trail Association is another example.


Offline wanderingwheel

Signing the Routes
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2007, 01:31:30 pm »
The signs that I was referring to are not the generic "Share the Road" or "Bike Route" signs.  Instead, they are patterned more after state highway signs, following numbered bike routes across the state.  Delving into my very faulty memory, I believe I've seen them in Colorado, Washington, Arizona, Pennsylvania, New York, and Rhode Isalnd.  Probably other places as well.

Sean


Offline macguys

Signing the Routes
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2007, 02:35:22 pm »
There are two interstate bike routes which are at least partially signed, Route 1 and Route 76.  There is an article on wikipedia that talks about these routes:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Numbered_Bicycle_Routes